2014 NASPA Alcohol, Other Drug Abuse, and Violence Prevention Conference

March 20 – May 22, 2014
Loews Coronado Bay - San Diego, California

The NASPA Alcohol, Other Drug Abuse, and Violence Prevention Conference is an exciting event focusing on emerging trends and best practices to ensure a thriving, safe campus.

About

Program Description & Learning Outcomes

Alcohol and other drug abuse continues to be a serious problem facing college students throughout the country. Research and assessment shows that many college students are still binge drinking, abusing drugs (both legal and illegal), and struggle with violence in their own lives, either as victims or aggressors of violent behavior.  The effects of alcohol use, drug use, and acts of violence on student learning, persistence and completion can be staggering.  

This year, the AOD conference has added Violence Prevention to its topics as evidence-based violence prevention programs are also an important part of keeping our campuses safe to ensure student success.  Campuses are not, by nature, violent places. Any act of violence is unacceptable in the very places our nation's students should expect the greatest peace and security in order to be successful in their academic pursuits.

The following questions have been developed to support the framework of this AODVP conference experience:

  •  What systems, policies, and procedures are in place to sharpen institutional decision-making and policy development? 
  •  What do the data truly show? And how can quality assessment and reporting improve the misconceptions of the data?
  •  How can student affairs administrators create injury and violence free living in our communities?
  •  How does the college/university communication system inform and involve senior administration and legal advisors during alcohol and/or drug abuse-related incidents?
  •  How do we ensure that alcohol and other drug abuse prevention efforts are integrated throughout the institution?
  •  How is overall health and wellness integrated in campus policies and procedures?

This three-day conference will bring together senior-level campus administrators, alcohol education specialists, health promotion advocates, violence prevention educators, and researchers from these functional areas to focus on advancing knowledge of student affairs educators and information-sharing about alcohol and other drug use and violence prevention initiatives on college and university campuses.

Working Conference: Team Attendance

The conference planning committee believes that those institutions sending multi-disciplinary teams to the conference will reap the greatest benefit, as there will be structured opportunities to discuss effective campus collaborations.

NASPA Mental Health Conference – Joint Conference

NASPA will hold the annual mental health conference at the same time as the alcohol, other drug abuse, and violence prevention event in the host hotel.  There will be joint keynotes and registrants may attend sessions held at the mental health conference with their alcohol conference registration fee.  Click here for information on the 2014 NASPA Mental Health Conference.

CONTINUING EDUCATION UNITS
Image of the NBCC logo and link to the NBCC homepage
National Board of Certified Counselors 

All of NASPA's professional development opportunities provide CEU credits from the National Board for Certified Counselors, Inc.  Forms and information will be provided at NASPA conferences.

Image of the National Comission for Health Education Credentialing and link to its website

National Commission for Health Education Credentialing,  Inc.

The 2014 NASPA Alcohol, Other Drug Abuse and Violence Prevention Conference and the 20143 NASPA Mental Health Conference will provide CEU credits from the National Commission for Health Educations Credentialing, Inc. Forms and information will be provided at the conferences.

Call for Programs

The call for programs is now closed.  Thank you for your submissions!  The programs are now out for review with our volunteer program reviewers.  Notifications of your program status will be made by November 1, 2013.

The conference planning committee will give preference to program submissions that provide an evidence-based, collaborative approach to "mental well-being" as it relates to overall wellness (e.g., alcohol and drug misuse, violence prevention, physical health, stress management, social relationships, spirituality and religiosity, etc.).  Educational program sessions are 60-minutes in length.  Poster sessions are held during the opening reception and will be 90 minutes.

The conference plenary speakers and various concurrent and poster sessions will provide information for all institutional types on the topic areas below:

  • Infrastructure and policy development review

  • Efficacy data on effective and innovative prevention strategies

  • Examples of environmental management by campus-based leadership

  • Creation of campus and community partnerships to address heavy drinking and drug abuse among college and university students

  • Alcohol abuse prevention strategies with athletes, Greeks and other campus populations at risk for increased alcohol abuse tendencies

  • Development and successful implementation of an assessment plan for alcohol abuse prevention

  • Successful implementation of recovery residence halls and housing

  • Brief intervention models for reducing high-risk drinking

  • Successful violence prevention initiatives with collaborating partnerships on and off campus

  • Educational programming successes related to harm reduction and intervention strategies
Special Directors of Health Promotion, Prevention & Wellness Services Track
Call for Programs

The Conference Planning Committee is seeking program proposals for the Directors of Health Promotion, Prevention & Wellness Services track at the NASPA Mental Health Conference and the NASPA Alcohol & Other Drug Abuse Prevention & Intervention Conference!  Please indicate that you would like your program to be included in this track in your proposal!  Below are the learning outcomes and interest areas for the health promotion, prevention & wellness track!

Learning Outcomes

Targeting Directors of Health Promotion, Prevention and Wellness Services, these sessions with provide an opportunity for Directors to increase knowledge and understanding of effective and innovative primary prevention strategies and the organizational models needed to support these services.

The participants will be able to:

  • Utilize varying sources and types of data to drive the conversations, collaborations, and priorities on your campus
  • Identify specific collaborations critical for broadening responsibility for health, prevention, and wellness initiatives
  • Interpret population specific data and peer-reviewed literature to guide their health promotion, prevention, and wellness departments
  • Provide examples of campuses using evidence-based (informed) practice as a cornerstone of their primary prevention programs
  • Apply standards in service evaluation, strategic planning, resource allocation, and program infrastructure assessment
  • Articulate the paradigms, opportunities and challenges inherent with both student development and public health professionals on staff

Conference Themes & Suggested Topics

  • Alcohol, and Other Drug Abuse, and Violence Prevention Conference Themes and Topics

    •  What systems, policies, and procedures are in place to sharpen institutional decision-making and policy development? 

    •  What do the data truly show? And how can quality assessment and reporting improve the misconceptions of the data?

    •  How can student affairs administrators create injury and violence free living in our communities?

    •  How does the college/university communication system inform and involve senior administration and legal advisors during alcohol and/or drug abuse-related incidents?

    •  How do we ensure that alcohol and other drug abuse prevention efforts are integrated throughout the institution?

    •  How is overall health and wellness integrated in campus policies and procedures?

    This three-day conference will bring together senior-level campus administrators, 

  • Special Wellness and Health Promotion Directors Track

    Targeting Wellness and Health Promotion Directors (WHPD), these sessions will provide an opportunity for primary leaders of campus health promotion and wellness efforts to use the “Ottawa Charter on Health Promotion,” the “Institute of Medicine Prevention Protractor,” and other foundational tools to increase knowledge and understanding of effective and innovative primary prevention and wellness strategies and the organizational models needed to support risk reduction, wellness enhancement, from a prevention perspective.

    Participants will be able to:

    • Increase their knowledge of foundational references which guide effective Universal, Selective and Indicated prevention strategies

    • Provide examples of campuses implementing evidence informed practices in health promotion

    • Identify specific multi-institutional collaborations critical for broadening the body of knowledge of health promotion for college students

    • Provide examples of campuses using CAS Standards to guide their health promotion and wellness departments

    • Interpret population specific data to drive the conversations, collaborations, and priorities

    • Articulate paradigms, opportunities and challenges faced by health promotion professionals on campus inherent  in using educational psychology, student development, public health, and systems theories

    • Contribute to the development of a NASPA Wellness and Health Promotion Institute



Submission Timeline
  • October 11, 2013
    Call for Programs Deadline
  • November 1, 2013
    Notification of Programs Status

Writing Tips

Looking for tips on writing an effective NASPA proposal? See sample submissions and formatting tips in our Program Submission Guidelines.

Questions?

Please contact NASPA if you have any further questions about submitting a program proposal for the 2014 NASPA Alcohol, Other Drug Abuse, and Violence Prevention Conference.

Tiki Ayiku
Director of Educational Programs
Phone: 202-265-7500, ext. 1184
Email: tayiku@naspa.org

Schedule

The 2014 NASPA Alcohol, Other Drug Abuse and Violence Prevention Conference takes place at the same place and time as the Mental Health Conference.  Participants can wander freely between sessions and attend both conference sessions.  The Mobile App will have the most up-to-date changes. 

Visit the Mental Health Conference schedule to see additional sessions.

To download presenter materials, please visit http://apps.naspa.org/engage/arch_search.cfm, and select 2014 Mental Health Conference & Alcohol and Other Drug Abuse, Violence Prevention Conference. Once this is selected, please click view.

Day 1 Thu, Jan 16
7:30 a.m. - 6:00 p.m.
Conference Registration
9:00 a.m. - 12:00 p.m.
Pre-Conference Workshop
Details

Click on Pre-Conference above for the details on pre-conference workshops.

1:30 p.m. - 2:45 p.m.
Opening Session
3:00 p.m. - 4:00 p.m.
Concurrent Sessions
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Brittania
Strategies for Reducing High-Risk Alcohol Use Among the Greek Community
Details

Lauren Wooley, Research Analyst - EverFi

Greek communities have historically served as positive centers of student social life, yet recently have not been associated with the affirming activities and values of their roots. We will explore how campuses and national organizations have steered the Greek culture back to the better, calling upon the collective efforts of a variety of constituencies that influence this important student population.

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Constellation A
Implementing Comprehensive Environmental Management Strategies to Address High Risk Drinking
Details

Kim Dude, Director of the Wellness Resource Center - University of Missouri

We cannot expect students to heed prevention messages if environmental influences draw them in the opposite direction. Through the power of partnerships, the University of Missouri’s Wellness Resource Center with key stakeholders has implemented comprehensive evidence-based environmental management strategies that have changed the environment that influences individual's behavior choices. The WRC has worked to change the campus and community environment through an integrated combination of programs, policies, and public education campaigns that address students at risk behavior off campus.

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Constellation B
Preventing Sexual Violence on Campus by Creating a Sexually Healthy Community
Details

Kimberly Frick, Health Educator Senior - Arizona State University

As sexual violence continues to remain a problem at American colleges and universities, health promotion professionals and preventative staff must envision creative ways to build a safe and healthy campus community. Sexual violence can be prevented by incorporating consent education, communication skills, and bystander intervention into sexual health education. Promoting a healthy sexuality and having an open dialogue about sex and gender with students is instrumental to reducing the incidence of sexual violence. Sexual violence affects academic success and persistence, and students who live in a sexually healthy community free of violence will be more likely to succeed and persist towards graduation.

4:15 p.m. - 5:15 p.m.
Concurrent Sessions
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Brittania
Helping students choose their Directions: An intervention and prevention program for marijuana
Details

Christine Johnston, MPH, Assistant Program Director for Student Wellness - University of Southern Indiana
Marcia Kennard Kiessling, Ed.D., Associate Provost for Student Affairs - University of Southern Indiana
B. Thomas Longwell Psy.D. HSPP, Director SI Counseling Center - University of Southern Indiana
Terry Coleman, MS, Assistant Director of Student Conduct Housing and Residence Life - University of Southern Indiana

Directions is a brief intervention and prevention program designed to address marijuana use among students. The program was developed to address the lack of educational sanctions available for students found in violation of campus drug policy. Data suggests that students participating in Directions can better identify risky decisions and are more likely to change their behavior. This presentation will outline the Directions program, provide assessment data, and incorporate discussion about implementing marijuana prevention efforts on campuses with varying legal climates.

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Cambria
Connection versus Enforcement: Lessons Learned from the “Teachable Moments”
Details

Diane Logan, Postdoctoral Research Fellow - Brown University
Jason Kilmer, Asst. Director of Health & Wellness for Alcohol & Other Drug Education and Research Asst. Professor - University of Washington
Tim Marchell, Director of Mental Health Initiatives and Associate Director of Health Services for Health Promotion - Cornell University

As part of a campus’s strategic plan, how do student affairs personnel balance policy enforcement with student autonomy? How do student and administrator attitudes impact outcomes following a “teachable moment” (e.g., an aversive event such as an alcohol emergency or policy violation)? This symposium will combine the latest mandated student and policy research, discuss the impact of student defensiveness and the role of medical amnesty policies, and offer a theoretical framework and concrete suggestions to improve effectiveness in student interactions.

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Constellation A
But it’s tradition! Three approaches to managing risk at all-campus events
Details

Jennifer Jacobsen, Wellness Director - Grinnell College
Geoff Swanson, Assistant Director of Student Activities - St. Oaf College
Brian Dietz, Assistant Dean of Students - Kalamazoo College

One of the toughest AODV challenges facing student affairs professionals can be the traditional, campus-wide events that either directly or indirectly involve risky alcohol-related behaviors. How can we balance harm reduction with the recognition that such efforts might drive the riskiest behavior underground? How do we manage pushback from current students and alumni? ("It's tradition!") Three colleges approached this challenge in significantly different ways and will discuss the pros and cons of each strategy as well as lessons learned in the process.

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Soverign
Building a Safer Community: Launching a Comprehensive Sexual Assault Primary Prevention Initiative
Details

Emily Werner, Coordinator of Health & Wellness Initiatives - Indiana University, Purdue University Indianapolis (IUPUI)
Mike Hines, Psychologist - Indiana University, Purdue University Indianapolis (IUPUI)

Preventing sexual violence on campus continues to be a serious campus and public health issue. Addressing the issue is critical to creating a safer campus community and encouraging student learning and success. During this session, the presenters will provide an overview of the development of a comprehensive sexual assault primary prevention initiative at an urban research institution. Framework will focus on the idea of primary prevention, the concept of Bystander Intervention, and utilizing a social marketing campaign for behavior change. Further discussion will highlight the successes, challenges, and future direction of the initiative.

5:30 p.m. - 6:15 p.m.
Plenary Speaker: Pamela S. Hyde, J.D. - SAMHSA
6:30 p.m. - 7:15 p.m.
Opening Reception & Poster Sessions
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Bay Terrace
Work Hard Party Hard: Examining High Risk High Achieving Students
Details

Krista Murphy, Dean of Students - Chestnut Hill College

This session will discuss high risk behaviors (alcohol use, drug use and sexual behavior) in a population of college students through the eyes of both quantitative and qualitative data. Qualitative interviews with high achieving students resulted in the explication of six themes: defining and conceptualizing risk taking, decision making, painting a picture of individual risk taking, academic achievement, peer perceptions and influence, and achieving both (work hard, party hard). This session will also discuss implications for practitioners.

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Bay Terrace
Just in Time: The Effects of a Medical Amnesty Policy on a College Campus
Details

Travis Glassman, Associate Professor - University of Toledo
Alexis Blavos, Doctoral Graduate Assistant - University of Toledo

Purpose: This investigation involved using the Health Belief Model (HBM) to examine college students’ attitudes toward medical amnesty. Methods: Researchers employed a cross sectional research design with 369 students completing the survey. Results: The results from the path analysis revealed that college students are more likely to call for help during an alcohol overdose when they perceive the situation as life-threatening. Discussion: Educating students about the benefits of medical amnesty and reducing barriers is essential to increasing bystander behavior.

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Bay Terrace
Underage Female Students Who Choose to Abstain From Drinking in College
Details

Deborah Gravelle, Administrator - CSU Channel Island

The purpose of this study was to examine the cognitive development of young females’ moral and ethical decision-making process. Research focuses on self-identified reasons underage college females chose not to drink in college. Exploring the experiences of underage female college students who chose to abstain from drinking in college from a female-related perspective, identified values and beliefs that influenced 11 underage female college students’ decision to abstain from drinking in college.

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Bay Terrace
Students' Perspective after participation of a Mandated Alcohol Intervention Program: A Phenomenological Qualitative Study
Details

Suzanna Guizar, Prevention of Substance Abuse Graduate Assistant - University of Arkansas

Students' Perspectives of a mandated college level alcohol intervention program: A Qualitative Phenomenological Research Design. The alcohol intervention program strives to provide an early intervention that is effective for college students. In addition, the intervention is designed to encourage the student to take a personal evaluation of their own attitudes, values, beliefs, and behaviors as they relate to their use of alcohol and other drugs. Pre and Post tests saw increase in knowledge from Pre (77.97%) to Post test (98.74). 50% of students perceive Cognitive-Behavioral skills as most beneficial. 25% of students perceived that most beneficial component was sharing experience with a health promoter. 25% of students perceived that the most beneficial component of the intervention was self reflection. The mean age of students is 18.5 years. Intervention Program components consists of alcohol screening, Pre-test (knowledge), Brief Motivational Interviewing, Education, Self-Monitoring Homework, Post-test (knowledge) and Behavior Change Contract. Approximately 100 Students who were mandated to attend an alcohol intervention program will be interviewed in order to explore students perspective of the overall efficacy of the alcohol intervention program in a large public Southern university. The Alcohol Intervention program is a evidence-based program that utilizes the Transtheoretical Model (TTM).

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Bay Terrace
How Clients in Alcoholics Anonymous Experience Therapist Self-Disclosure: An Exploratory Study
Details

Sarah Zucker, MA - Alliant International University
Starr MacKinnon, Ph.D. - San Diego State University
Steven Bucky, Ph.D. ABPP - Alliant International University

Qualitative research study examining how therapist self-disclosure impacts clients who participate in Alcoholics Anonymous. Using grounded theory and the constant comparative method, eight semi-structured interviews were conducted with participants who had at least five sessions with a licensed psychologist and were attending an average of two AA meetings a week. Results demonstrated that appropriately timed, general, and relevant self-disclosure was valued especially when used to show empathy, concern, and demonstrate that the therapist had faced similar challenges in the past.

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Bay Terrace
Alcohol in the College Environment: Assessing the Environment Around Your Campus
Details

Stephanie Kneeshaw-Price, Healthy CUNY Research Director - City University of New York
Patti Lamberson, Healthy CUNY Director - City University of New York

Previous research on alcohol advertising and use on college campuses has focused on traditional campus settings. This study explored the alcohol environment at a large urban campus where most students commute to school. Researchers developed an environmental audit. Staff collected pilot data about alcohol advertisements and establishments selling alcohol in the campus’ neighborhood. This presentation discusses developing and conducting an alcohol-related environmental audit and its results. We also describe students’ perceptions of the alcohol environment.

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Bay Terrace
Alcohol in the College Environment: NYC University Policies
Details

Stephanie Kneeshaw-Price, Healthy CUNY Research Director - City University of New York
Janice Chisholm, Doctoral Student - The Graduate Center of the City University of New York

Much recent research has been devoted to observing the effectiveness of policies to reduce college student alcohol use and its consequences. Since public health officials agree that policies are an effective lever for encouraging healthier behavior, our study sought to characterize and assess the alcohol-related policies at degree-granting institutions of higher education in New York City.

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Bay Terrace
Identifying and Addressing Dating/Domestic Violence on College and University Campuses
Details

Amelia Stults, Health Educator - California State University, Sacramento
Jessica Heskin, Violence and Sexual Assault Support Services Coordinator - California State University, Sacramento

Identifying and addressing domestic violence on a college campus has been a challenge for many universities. The dynamics of domestic violence may look different for student populations compared to the general population. Additionally, resources for reporting and addressing this problem are lacking on many university campuses. This workshop will focus on identification of dating/domestic violence, resources and strategies to address the problem and existing research of what resources currently exist (or do not exist) in many universities.

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Bay Terrace
Drinking Consequences and Secondhand Effects in a Sample of Rural College Students
Details

Meri Stiles, Associate Professor of Psychology and Human Services - Lyndon State College

College students engaging in binge drinking and heavy alcohol use are also at risk for secondhand effects from other students’ use of substances. A sample of 102 students at a small rural college completed a secondhand effects survey. Current binge drinkers were more likely to report experiencing secondhand effects than students reporting no current binge drinking. Likewise current binge drinkers were more likely than non-current binge drinkers to report that they were using substances when they experienced secondhand effects.

Day 2 Fri, Jan 17
7:00 a.m. - 8:00 a.m.
Continental Breakfast
8:00 a.m. - 9:00 a.m.
Concurrent Sessions
-
Brittania
Hazing Prevention: From Theory to Practice
Details

Timothy Marchell, Director of Mental Health Initiatives - Cornell University

Hazing is a public health problem, with many students experiencing emotional and physical harm that results from these practices. This session will examine the causes of hazing from a socio-ecological perspective and will provide a framework for a campus-wide hazing prevention strategy that includes education, detection, enforcement, and non-hazing group building. The dynamics of consent, the continuum of harm, and the role of alcohol in hazing will be examined.

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Cambria
Engaging Students in Primary (Violence & High-Risk Alcohol & other Drug Use) Prevention Through Self-Guided Training
Details

Sacchi Patel,Manager of Education & Emergency Response - Stanford University
Rachel Aumann, Assistant Dean of Student Life - Stanford University

Participants will evaluate the strengths and challenges of Group-Guided Training specific to Primary Violence Prevention & High Risk Alcohol & other Drug (AOD)-use Prevention. By utilizing live surveying, audience participation and perceived investment increases. This becomes particularly useful when engaging students in Primary Violence Prevention & High-Risk AOD-use Prevention.

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Constellation A
How to Hire/Create the Capacity for Campus Forensic Assessment
Details

Brian van Burnt, Vice President of Professional Program Development - NCHERM

This program will provide offer a practical and detailed exploration of what characteristics and qualities a college or university should look for when looking to hire (or internally train and develop) the capacity to perform forensic risk assessments.

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Constellation B
Educating the Community Empowering Survivors Preventing Violence
Details

Erica Tolles, Associate Director of Student Development & Counseling Center - Worcester Polytechnic Institute

Sexual Assaults happen on college campuses. Some campuses are making headlines for how they handle it when it happens – what they did right and what they didn’t do. Many campuses are have strategic plans for violence prevention. WPI’s plan incorporates students, faculty, and staff in prevention efforts. Come hear about what their campus has learned. There will also be the opportunity for participants to share their own successes, challenges, and best practices.

8:30 a.m. - 3:30 a.m.
Commodore Foyer
Exhibit Hall Open
9:15 a.m. - 10:00 a.m.
Morning Plenary Session: Dr. Susan F. Tapert
Details

Substance Use and the Brain: Implications for College Students

Substance use is common in adolescence and emerging adulthood, and rates of binge drinking are particularly high. Recent neuropsychological and brain imaging research have shown that the brain is continuing to develop through the college years (i.e., through the 20s), and that the brain may be more vulnerable to the effects of heavy doses of alcohol and other drugs and this developmental phase. This lecture will discuss how a health brain progresses through adolescence and young adulthood. We will explore data showing that substance use appears to affect the brain, and is linked to changes in thinking abilities over time. Finally, we will examine the role of the media in substance use decisions of young people. Implications for counseling college students on substance use issues will be reviewed.

10:15 a.m. - 12:15 p.m.
Mini-Institutes
-
Brittania
Capacity Building for Collegiate Recovery: Essential Assets and Campus Examples
Details

Jenna Parisi, Director of Research and Program Development - The Stacie Mathewson Foundation
Dolores Comini, Licensed Psychologist; Assistant Director for Prevention and Program Evaluation; Director of Middle Earth Peer Assistance Program; Adjunct Clinical Prof - University at Albany SUNY
Ivana Grahovac, Director of The Center for Students in Recovery - University of Texas at Austin
Rob Reff, Substance Abuse Prevention Coordinator - Oregon State University
Jen Sell Matzke, Assistant Dean of Students - St. Cloud State University

Growing numbers of institutions of higher education across the nation are looking to provide support for their students in recovery from alcohol and/or drug addiction. Attendees will hear from four different campuses about their experiences. They will also learn about essential assets for serving and supporting students in recovery, and how to apply a capacity building approach back on their home campuses to either initiate or expand upon existing services.

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Commodore B
Our Team Goal: Safe and Supportive Learning Environments
Details

Thomas Workman, Principla Communication Researcher - American institutes for Health
Lance Segars, Researcher - Silvergate Group/National Center for Safe and Supportive Learning

New models of safe and supportive learning environments solving the problem of competition between campus and community efforts to address student risk behaviors and wellness issues. This session will have participants creating comprehensive programs together that fit individual institution needs. The National Center for Safe and Supportive Learning from the US Department of Education will present approaches and resources in assessment, strategic planning, and evaluation that create environments that resolve barriers to academic and personal success.

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Constellation B
Social Norms Marketing: Theory Evidence Implementation Evaluation
Details

Adrienne Keller, Research Director - National Social Norms Institute, University of Virginia

Social norms marketing interventions are at the intersection of positive psychology and social marketing and have demonstrated effectiveness in reducing risk behaviors and increasing pro-social behaviors. This workshop will cover the theoretical and practical basis for using and evaluating social norms interventions. Picture a red rider holding oars while riding a large elephant up a flight of stairs. Curious? Come to the workshop and learn how to deconstruct the picture.

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Soverign
Reductions in medical encounters for intoxication with high BAC: Two years of campus-wide changes
Details

Aurora Matzkin, Director of Health Promotion and Student Wellness
Michael Wooten, Senior Assistant Dean of Residential Life and Director of Residential Education
Brian Bowden, Alcohol and Other Drug Education Programs Coordinator
Cailin Barthelmes, Alcohol and Other Drug Education Programs Coordinator
Jeremy Guardiola, Dean's Office Fellow
Brandon Harrington, Health Initiatives Coordinator Athletic Peak Performance Program
All Presenters from Dartmouth College

Dartmouth College’s Health Improvement Project team saw a significant reduction in medical encounters with blood alcohol content (BAC) higher than .25 during the National College Health Improvement Program’s two-year Learning Collaborative on High-Risk Drinking. The number of high-BAC cases decreased from 80 in 2010-2011 to 31 in 2012-2013. Join members of the team as they describe the strategies they implemented on the individual, environmental and systems level and the integral roles data and measurement played in their work.

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Aurora
Violence Prevention - Winning Strategies for Gender Violence Prevention & Bystander Intervention
Details

Duane de Four, Team Member, National Consortium for Academics and Sports

Mentors in Violence Prevention (MVP) is a gender violence, bullying and gay-bashing prevention program that was the first large-scale attempt to apply the bystander approach to issues of sexual and domestic violence. MVP also frames gender violence prevention as a leadership responsibility for leaders in educational institutions, as well as for student leaders and others. It has been implemented in the U.S. and around the world across myriad populations in schools, colleges and universities, sports organizations, and all branches of the United States military. The leadership and bystander focus allows the issues of gender violence prevention to be framed within a context of inclusion and responsibility for everyone. For example, rather than approach women as victims or potential victims, or men as perpetrators or potential perpetrators, we regard everyone as potentially empowered bystanders who are often in a position to challenge abusive or violent behavior. In addition, MVP materials focus on a continuum of behaviors that can lead to abuse. MVP has had unusual success working with groups and institutions that have been traditionally difficult to engage in gender violence prevention such as student and professional athletes/ athletic programs, Greek organizations, military organizations and personnel, and many others.

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Cambria
“Big Bang” Supports for Students with ASD: What Administrators Need to Know
Details

Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD) are increasing exponentially. Administrators need to know their obligations as well as effective means to support ASD students as part of their professional competency. Beware of the “business as usual” approach as students become more diverse. This interactive multimedia program utilizes the Big Bang television series to demonstrate behaviors and effective resolutions.

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Constellation A
Exploring the Efficacy of Integrative Inquiry: Decreasing Stress, Improving Critical Thinking Disposition, and Persistence
Details

Marilee Bresciani, Professor of Postsecondary Education, San Diego State University

Several reports indicate that employers are not satisfied with the preparedness level of students who are entering the job market. According to the Association of American Colleges and Universities 2013 survey of employer perceptions, employers wanted to see more evidence of graduates’ critical thinking, analytical reasoning, creativity, complex problem solving, collaboration, innovation, and ethical decision making. This 2-hour interactive workshop will introduce the concept of neuroplasticity, which is the notion that what we focus on literally changes the structure and function of our brains. In addition, the attention, emotion, and cognitive regulation tools researched to stimulate structural and functional changes in the brain in order to decrease stress and anxiety, increase attention, focus, and self-compassion will be introduced and practiced. Participants will be able to define neuroplasticity and identify and practice at least one attention and emotion regulation training tool. In addition, participants will be able to explain why neuroplasticity, via the training tools, can enhance overall well-being. Implications for student affairs work will be shared.

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Commodore E
Bringing Brief Interventions for Marijuana to Campus: Recent Findings and Emerging Questions
Details

Jason Kilmer, Ph.D., Assistant Director of Health & Wellness fro Alcohol & Other Drug Education and Assistant Professor, Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences, University of Washington

Recent research has looked at identifying what students see as the unwanted effects associated with marijuana use, in addition to testing brief interventions for reducing marijuana use and related consequences. In this mini-institute, findings from a study of an individually focused, motivational interviewing based personalized feedback intervention will be described. Consequences students see as unwanted will be reviewed (as will the science behind these effects of marijuana). The group will practice with key motivational interviewing strategies for eliciting personally relevant reasons to change marijuana use and for reducing and responding to resistance/defensiveness that may arise. Emerging research topics (including research questions related to the impact of legalization) will be briefly discussed.

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Commodore A
Assessing Threats made through Technology
Details

Brian Van Brunt, Ed.D., Senior Vice President for Professional Program Development, The NCHERM Group

A faculty member is in jail after allegedly posting on Facebook that he might climb a campus facility with a high-powered rifle “with a good scope.” A university student faces a felony charge after friends reported he posted a picture of a bomb threat on Facebook. A college student was arrested following the discovery of threats texted to a friend that threatened to harm a faculty member that gave him a “D”. These are just a few examples of scenarios that colleges have taken notice of in recent years, as more students and faculty use social media to communicate threats to a larger population. Today’s technology allows an aggressor to share a direct communicated threat via a text message, website, blog or email. A person may share a Facebook status update that creates hysteria in school or campus. Another may post a Twitter comment that generates a law enforcement response. This training will walk you through recent case studies of direct communicated threats and offer guidance in terms of BIT, conduct and counseling response. Each case will serve to illustrate the central premise of the program: rapid detection and intervention of social media and other forms of leakage must be paired with thoughtful, research-based assessment and management to truly mitigate potential threat.

12:15 p.m. - 1:15 p.m.
Lunch (on own)
1:15 p.m. - 2:15 p.m.
Concurrent Sessions
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Cambria
Implementing the Biennial Review Process on Your Campus
Details

Eric Davidson, Director - Illinois Higher Education Center for Alcohol, Other Drug, and Violence Prevention

As part of the Drug Free Schools and Campuses Mandate, each institution receiving Federal Funds is required to complete a full review of their comprehensive substance abuse program on a biennial basis. This workshop will review current requirements and mandates concerning the biennial review process, review processes considered best practice, suggestions on programs, policies and data sources to be reviewed, and how to use the review process as a strategic planning method.

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Constellation A
Prevention is a Journey Not a Destination: Lessons from One Campus Team about the Meaning of Success and the Road that Lies Ahead
Details

M. Dolores Cimini, Assistant Director for Prevention and Program Evaluation - University of Albany, SUNY
Elizabeth Conrad, Associate Director of Student Organization Management - University of California, San Diego
Graciela Desemone, Clinical Physician University Health Center - University at Albany, SUNY
Laurie Garafola, Diector of Resident Life - University of Wisconsin, Oshkosh
Kimberly Kaufmann, Undergraduate Student and Member of Middle Earth Peer Assistance Program - University at Albany, SUNY
Nancy Lauricella, Associate Director of Conflict Resolution and Civic Responsibility - University at Albany SUNY
Estela Rivero, Director of University Counseling Center - University at Albany SUNY

In recent years, the alcohol and other drug prevention and intervention field has made great advances in clarifying what works to reduce alcohol use and related negative consequences among college students. While the body of evidence about what constitutes effective comprehensive AOD prevention programs grows, there is comparatively little opportunity for us to listen to the voices of key campus stakeholders – prevention specialists, physicians, counseling center professionals, conduct officers, student organization advisors, residential life staff members, and students – about what they are doing both individually and collaboratively to make a program work, how they remain optimistic in the face of challenges, and what makes them care about prevention in the first place. In the voices of seven members of an institution of higher education that has faced critical and very public AOD-related challenges, this workshop will explore a decade-long journey to success, identify challenges along the way, and map the long road ahead.

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Soverign
Manage the Environment: Alcohol Prevention for Everyone
Details

Lynn Schoenberg, Executive Director of Holistic Wellness - Stetson University
Christopher Kandus-Fischer, Vice President of Student Affairs - Stetson University

Environment dictates behavior. Learn how Stetson University embarked on a five year plan implementing a holistic environmental management approach to alcohol and drug prevention on campus. In 2007 Stetson University did not have a deliberate approach to alcohol and other drug prevention and education. Six years later, they have a program that is comprehensive, multi dimensional, and showing results.

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Aurora
Life is not a Spectator Sport: Bystander Intervention Prevention Approach
Details

Kim Dude, Director of the Wellness Resrource Center, University of Missouri

LINASS (Life Is Not A Spectator Sport) Training is a comprehensive, interactive educational intervention designed to increase students’ ability and willingness to protect each other from harm in alcohol or other health related situations. Whether it is taking the keys, calling 911 or stopping a friend from texting and driving, LINASS is empowering students to make a difference by being an active bystander and being part of the solution. Participants will increase their knowledge of the role peer pressure plays in student drinking behavior, decrease misperceptions about overall peer drinking behavior, and increase their understanding of bystander intervention theory.

2:30 p.m. - 3:30 p.m.
Afternoon Plenary Session
3:45 p.m. - 4:45 p.m.
Concurrent Sessions
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Cambria
Adapting BASICS for Marijuana Use: Moving Beyond a Half-Baked Idea
Details

Rebecca Caldwell, Director of Substance Abuse & Violence Prevention - University of North Carolina Wilmington
Mallorie Carroll, Graduate Assistant - UNCW CROSSROADS
Sarah Ehlke, Graduate Assistant - UNCW CROSSROADS

Campuses need effective interventions for problematic marijuana use. BASICS (Brief Alcohol Screening and Intervention for College Students) is an effective intervention for high-risk alcohol use for college students and an intuitive fit for marijuana users. UNCW uses an adaption of the BASICS model for marijuana use, including an assessment session, feedback session, and booster session. Participants reported lower CUDIT scores and marijuana expectancies at follow-up. Session participants will share and discuss successes and challenges to implementing marijuana feedback interventions.

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Commodore A
Town-Gown strategies to enhance relationships and decrease high-risk drinking
Details

Robert Reff, Substance Abuse Prevention Coordinator - Oregon State University
Jennifer Summers, Director of Substance Abuse Prevention and Student Success - University of Oregon
Jennifer Sell Matzke, Assistant Dean of Students - St. Cloud State University
Jennifer Johnson, Coordinator for Alcohol Prevention & Community Programming - St. Cloud State University

Excessive alcohol use by college students and related negative impacts are a top complaint from university communities around the country. Methods to enhance university-community relationships in efforts to reduce high-risk alcohol use and improve neighborhood livability will be shared. The presentation will focus on understanding how effective Town-Gown relationships can reduce high-risk alcohol use. Specific theories, strategies, research, outcomes and lessons learned will be presented such that attendees will be able to translate and implement ideas to their home campuses.

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Constellation A
Connecting with Student Leaders to Advance Alcohol and Other Drug Prevention Efforts
Details

Connie Boehm, Director of Student Life Student Wellness Center
Javaune Adams-Gaston, Vice President for Student Life
Bryan Ashton, Senior Coordinator of Student Life Student Wellness Center
All Presenters from The Ohio State University

Wellness efforts require continual review through discussion, observation, and engagement of campus and community leaders. Presenters discuss OSU's targeted connections with student leaders to advance alcohol and other drug prevention. Presenters will provide participants with innovative insights gained from student leaders through individual meetings with the Vice President for Student Life, through coordination of wellness events, and through systematic, supportive educational programming for student leaders. Presenters will encourage participants to share efforts to connect with student leaders to advance wellness.

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Soverign
GAUCHO FYI: UC Santa Barbara's innovative First Year Student small group workshops mandated for all incoming students within first 6 weeks of school.
Details

Jacqueline Kurta, Director of Alcohol and Drug Program
Mark Shishim, Acting Director of Health & Wellness Program
Don Lubach, Associate Dean First Year and Graduate Initiatives
Maryam Kia-Keating, Associate Professor of Clinical Psychology
All Presenters from University of California, Santa Barbara

"Gaucho FYI" is a 90-minute, peer-facilitated, small group workshop mandated for entering UC Santa Barbara freshman and transfer students that addresses critical heath and safety topics, as well as campus resources and services. A team of campus departments collaborated to develop an engaging, interactive prevention-focused curriculum targeting high risk substance use, mental health, sexual assault prevention, community safety, and personal well-being.

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Commodore CDE
SAMHSA’s Technology-based Products to Prevent High-risk Drinking among College Students Challenge: Prizewinners Showcase
Details

In September 2013, the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) announced the three prizewinners for its Technology-based Products to Prevent High-risk Drinking among College Students Challenge. SAMHSA launched this Challenge in May 2013 to help decrease high-risk drinking among college students, which is widely prevalent among many college campuses. For example, according to the latest findings from SAMHSA’s National Survey on Drug Use and Health, 40.1 percent of full-time college students are binge drinkers. SAMHSA opened the Challenge to seek solutions to prevent high-risk drinking among college students through cost-effective, portable, technology-based products. These products also needed to effectively reach college students and their parents, as well as administrators, faculty, and staff. In addition, they had to be adaptable to meet the local needs of academic institutions throughout the United States. This session will provide background on the Challenge’s development and implementation and will showcase the three prizewinners’ products, including why the products were developed and how they are use on each campus.

5:00 p.m. - 6:00 p.m.
Concurrent Sessions
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Aurora
Using Logic Models to Develop and Assess Prevention Programming
Details

Eric Davidson, Director - Illinois Higher Education Center for Alcohol, Other Drug, and Violence Prevention

When an emerging issue presents itself, educators are often given an immediate call to action to respond and address such problems. In response to our “knee jerk” reactions, programs and interventions are often put together without fully understanding the relationships between the long-term, intermediate, and short-term comes we seek and the program resources, activities and outputs we have available to use. Understanding and being able to apply a logic model helps overcome this problem.

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Brittania
Collaboration and Culture: Athletics and Student Affairs Transforming Campuses - Part II
Details

Mary Wilfert, Associate Director, NCAA Sports Science Institute

Student-athletes present some unique issues related to alcohol/other drug use on our campuses. Student affairs professionals who are successful with this student group have developed understanding of the cultural factors that contribute to student-athlete behaviors. Part II will engage attendees on policy challenges, when athletics department and campus policies diverge, including a closer look at how Good Samaritan policies apply across campus, how marijuana is treated within and without athletics, and what intervention protocols are in place. Attendees will be led in discussions of barriers and best practices in successful collaborations engaging athletics with campus efforts, and develop confidence as prevention leaders in serving this student group. Prevention resources will include a glimpse at the 360 Proof initiative between NASPA small colleges and NCAA Division III and resources to engage coaches in AOD prevention. Attendance at Part I is not essential for Part II.

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Commodore A
Reframing the Resident Assistant Role in Prevention
Details

Kimberly Timpf, Director of Partner Education - EverFI

How do you best prepare resident assistants to enforce policy, respond to problem behavior, AND engage residents in learning experiences that address alcohol and other health issues in a meaningful way? This session will explore a paradigm shift in how we typically view the RA role in prevention and how we prepare them for that role. Particular emphasis will be placed on the use of one-on-one structured experiences versus traditional programming as a more effective means of addressing these challenging issues.

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Constellation A
Marijuana Update: How the ever changing environment for marijuana affects campus prevention
Details

James Lange, Coordinator of AOD Initiatives - San Diego State University
Kevin Sabet, Director of Drug Policy Institute - University of Florida College of Medicine Department of Psychiatry

Marijuana is the most widely used illegal drug in the nation and also on college campuses. It is also a drug that is experiencing the greatest changes in legal controls. The presenters will discuss both national and campus data with a focus on prevention, intervention, and policy implications across college campuses. An exploration and discussion of plausible prevention responses to the apparent upward trend in use will be presented as well. Problems beyond simple use will be discussed including impaired driving, dependence and school failure, in addition to the issues most frequently endorsed by students

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Constellation B
If You Ask, They Might Tell: Proactive Outreach in the Campus Setting
Details

Shannon Bailie, Director of Health & Wellness
Jason Kilmer, Asst. Director of Health & Wellness for Alcohol & Other Drug Education and Research Asst. Professor
Melissa Tumas, Sexual Assault and Relationship Violence Specialist
Amanda Myhre, Student Care Coordinator
All Presenters from University of Washington

Although many campuses have incorporated behavior intervention teams for high-profile/high-risk students (largely related to violence prevention), many other students “on the radar” of student affairs administrators could be struggling without getting connected to support services. One strategy for reaching students is proactive outreach. This session will describe strategies and practices for outreach following sexual assault, substance use-related emergencies, safety concerns, and personal tragedies or challenges. Follow-up data, lessons learned, and additional opportunities for identifying at-risk students will be discussed.

Day 3 Sat, Jan 18
7:00 a.m. - 8:00 a.m.
Continental Breakfast
7:30 a.m. - 8:30 a.m.
Roundtable Discussions
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Brittania
Work Hard Party Hard: Examining High Risk High Achieving Students
Details

Krista Murphy, Dean of Students - Chestnut Hill College

This session will discuss high risk behaviors (alcohol use, drug use and sexual behavior) in a population of college students through the eyes of both quantitative and qualitative data. Qualitative interviews with high achieving students resulted in the explication of six themes: defining and conceptualizing risk taking, decision making, painting a picture of individual risk taking, academic achievement, peer perceptions and influence, and achieving both (work hard, party hard). This session will also discuss implications for practitioners.

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Cambria
Media Literacy: A Crucial Component of Alcohol and Sexual Violence Prevention Programs
Details

Mica Hughes-Harrell, Director of Wellness Services - University of West Florida

This interactive presentation will promote using media literacy as a primary prevention technique for alcohol and sexual violence prevention. Benefits for teaching this skill as a prevention strategy will be outlined, as will the benefits of using media as a springboard for providing engaging health promotion programs. Segments of UWF Wellness Services’ programs will be showcased to highlight how to incorporate media literacy into college student alcohol misuse/abuse and violence prevention efforts.

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Commodore A
Meaningful Metrics in AODV Prevention
Details

Jennifer Jacobsen, Wellness Director - Grinnell College

Meaningful measurement presents a major challenge in AODV prevention efforts. Often what is “easy” to measure doesn’t tell the whole story (e.g. hospital transports) and/or success is measured by what doesn’t happen (e.g. sexual assaults). Participants are invited to share measurements used on their campuses along with their advantages and limitations, and then collaborate to (1) identify gaps in measurement, (2) explore and exchage innovative and multifaceted solutions, and (3) determine strategies for communicating this information to key stakeholders while better targeting future interventions.

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Soverign
The Efficacy of Alcohol Prevention Strategies 12 Years After the NIAAA Report
Details

Helen Stubbs, Vice President of Higher Education - EverFi

The NIAAA’s Call to Action report supported improved high-risk drinking prevention on campus, and called for increased evaluation of programmatic impact. Twelve years beyond, a rich literature now exists to better inform the prevention field regarding the relative efficacy of an array of programs that were previously under-researched. This session presents findings from a comprehensive review of current literature on the relative impact of 35 alcohol prevention strategies, demonstrating ways in which the NIAAA’s “Tiers of Effectiveness” are now obsolete.

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Aurora
360-Proof: NASPA & NCAA Collaborative
Details

This session will highlight how the NCAA Division III and NASPA Small Colleges and Universities Alcohol and Other Drug Collaborative can help campuses address the vexing issue of student alcohol abuse. It will include a demonstration of the Collaborative's first resource, 360 Proof, and a focus group session on related promotional materials.

8:45 a.m. - 9:30 a.m.
Morning Plenary Speaker: Dr. Melissa Lewis - University of Washington
Details

Feeling Down about Hooking Up: Examining Associations among Emotional Reactions, Alcohol, Sexual Behavior, and Victimization

“Hooking up”, or casual, non-committed sexual relationships, have become increasingly common among college students and young adults. However, little research conducted to date has examined the role of alcohol and past sexual victimization history on both the prevalence of and emotional consequences of hooking up. This presentation will consist of findings from four studies that examine emotional reactions to hooking up, alcohol use, risky sexual behavior, and sexual victimization. The first study examines factors associated with experiencing positive and negative affect resulting from the most recent hookup among college students. The second study examines the multiple hooking up definitions among college students and how different definitions are associated with student sexual-risk behavior. The third study examines the prospective role of past sexual assault on subsequent hooking up practices and emotional reactions among young adult lesbian and bisexual women. Finally, the fourth study evaluates the efficacy of a personalized normative feedback intervention on college student alcohol-related risky sexual behavior. All studies have relevant clinical implications regarding the role of situational stressors, such as the impact on affect following a hookup. Additionally, this research can help provide student affairs practitioners with the tools and strategies necessary to reduce the risks associated with and effectively deal with the challenges related to stressors, alcohol use, and sexual behavior on college campuses.

9:45 a.m. - 10:45 a.m.
Concurrent Sessions
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Soverign
Small Colleges & Universities (SCU) Roundtable
Details

W. Houston Dougherty, VP for Student Affairs - Grinnell College
Jennifer Jacobsen, Wellness Director - Grinnell College

The Small Colleges & Universities (SCU) Division of NASPA believes that a forum should be available at all NASPA events that sponsors and encourages collaboration and sharing among its members from campuses with under 5000 students. This SCU Roundtable will provide an opportunity for colleagues from small campuses to connect and network around the topics of Mental Health and AOD/Violence Prevention.

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Aurora
Pre-Departure Prevention for Students Studying Abroad
Details

Amaura Kemmererm, Director of Office of Prevention and Education
Chrissy Civiletto, Coordinator of Sexual Assault Services
Liz Hearn, Program Administrator
All Presenters from Northeastern University

Northeastern University Alcohol and Other Drug Educators teamed up with the Sexual Violence Prevention staff to develop a comprehensive study abroad pre-departure program aimed at addressing high-risk substance use, sexual related consequences and sexual violence. The program will explore differential risks for students studying abroad and offer specific strategies that may be helpful with implementing your own pre-departure prevention sessions for this at-risk cohort. Results from Northeastern’s approach and programs will be shared.

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Brittania
Are You Aware?: An interactive theatre approach to peer facilitated prevention
Details

Kim Wilcox, Director of Counseling Center
Emily Hedstrom-Lieser, Assistant Director of Prevention Education & Advocacy Services
Lee Shefferman, Senior Staff Psychologist Counseling Center
All Presenters from University of Northern Colorado

Are You Aware? is an interactive theater production utilizing the social norms approach to address safety and development concerns for incoming students. Pre and Post tests assess learning outcomes, which includes alcohol use, prescription drug abuse, sexual health, consent, bystander intervention, hate speech and bias response, and campus resources. This production utilizes National College Health Assessment data specific to our campus and educates students about issues relevant to the college population. After the production, moderators will review data and address participant questions.

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Constellation A
Engaging Your Campus in Violence Prevention: A Blueprint for Success
Details

M. Dolores Cimini, Assistant Director for Prevention and Program Evaluation - University of Albany, SUNY
Nancy Wahlig, Director of Sexual Assault & Violence Prevention Resource Center (SARC) - University of California, San Diego

In recent years, the violence prevention field has made great advances in clarifying what works to reduce sexual assault, intimate partner violence, and related behaviors among college students. As the evidence base to support individual, group, and community interventions grows, comparatively little attention is given to describing and articulating the specific elements of effective programs and illustrating how effective model elements work or don’t work on different campuses. This workshop will identify and explore the underpinnings of successful evidence-based violence prevention programs and will illustrate how simple efforts to foster stakeholder engagement can enhance intervention momentum and competence, stakeholder buy-in, and sustained program support.

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Constellation B
Lessons Learned from Applying Quality Improvement Methods to High-Risk Drinking
Details

Lisa Johnson, Director - National College Health Improvement Program
Timothy Marchell, Associate Director for Health Promotion - Cornell University

Through the use of quality improvement methods, schools have found positive, measurable change on their campuses to prevent harms resulting from high-risk drinking. This presentation will explain the methods used by the collaborative; it will highlight some significant successes and discuss the essential components needed to implement meaningful change.

11:00 a.m. - 12:00 p.m.
Concurrent Sessions
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Brittania
Enhancing Student Success through Supporting Students with ADHD and Addressing Adderall Abuse
Details

Melissa Halter, Director of Center for Health and Wellness Promotion - University of San Diego
Chris Burden, Director of Disability Services - University of San Diego

Adderall is increasingly abused as a “study drug”; approximately, 7% of students report having used stimulants for cognitive enhancements. Professionals need to beware of abuse, while supporting students who are struggling with ADHD. Additionally, students with ADHD are more likely to engage in high risk-taking behaviors such as problematic drinking and drug abuse. This program will provide an opportunity for dialogue and participants will learn collaborative strategies to support students diagnosed with ADHD and students who are abusing stimulants.

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Cambria
Environmental Promotion: Considering the Design of Drinking Environments to Promote Responsible Behavior
Details

James Lange Coordinator of AOD Initiatives - San Diego State University
Erin Meluso, President - RADD The Entertainment Industry's Voice for Road Safety

Extending environmental prevention beyond access restrictions, we explore the implications of behavioral design principals to alcohol-risk reduction within a coalition setting. The California College DUI Awareness Project was formed to promote solutions to student DUI. This strategy exemplifies a behavioral model for environmental prevention. It’s DUI-prevention initiative brings together campuses, state agencies – California Office of Traffic Safety and California Department of Alcoholic Beverage Control– law enforcement, and hospitality zones to sustainably address DUI.

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Commodore A
Navigating Mandatory Alcohol & Violence Prevention Education on a College Campus
Details

Jessica Heskin, Violence and Sexual Assault Support Services Coordinator - California State University, Sacramento
Amelia Stults, Alcohol, Tobacco, and Other Drug Program Coordinator - California State University, Sacramento

Compliance with federal, state and local laws/policies mandating education of incoming students about alcohol and violence is a concern for many universities. Online tutorials are a viable method for ensuring that all students receive this education. The process for implementation and data analysis can be cumbersome, but the pay-off for staff and administrators can also be worth the effort. This presentation outlines the journey for implementing this process for California State University, Sacramento and the lessons learned along the way.

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Soverign
Stand Strong Against Violence! – Integrated Campus Prevention Efforts
Details

Sulma Gandhi, Director for Student Health & Wellness Programs - University of Hawaii at Hilo
Andrew Polloi, Counselor - University of Hawaii at Hilo

In this session, participants will learn about a nationally recognized, integrative health and wellness approach to violence prevention efforts which includes organizing and running a men’s group and connecting with on and off campus partners. Men of Strength (MOS) is a culturally relevant and innovative campus organization at the University of Hawai‘i at Hilo Student Health and Wellness Programs, that is comprised of male students, faculty and staff who are dedicated to ending violence on campus and in the community.

Pre-Conference Programs & Events

Pre-Conference #1 - Understanding the DSM-5: Problems and Prospects in the Diagnostic Revisions

Thursday, January 16th • 09.00 AM – 12.00 PM

The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM) has undergone substantial revision across its sixty years of evolution, with the latest version (DSM-5) continuing that tradition in substantial ways. The discontinuation of the multi-axial system, the addition and deletion of specific disorders, the regrouping and reclassification of familiar disorders, and significant changes in the names, nature and criteria associated with various disorders all mark the fifth edition of the DSM as a substantial, and controversial, revision of the diagnostic system. In addition to receiving a detailed overview of the primary changes and rationales associated with those revisions, participants will also gain experience in utilizing several novel inclusions in the DSM-5, including the new cross-cutting diagnostic dimensions and the new Personality Disorders assessment, the PID-5.

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Presenter:

Greg J. Neimeyer, Ph.D., Director, Office of Continuing Education in Psychology, American Psychological Association

Learning Objectives:

Participants will be able to:

1.  Identify at least ten (10) key changes in the DSM-5
2. Describe the significant conceptual changes associated with the revisions in the manual
3. Discuss at least three significant controversies generated by the most recent revision of the DSM
4. Identify at least three novel inclusions in the new “Section 3” of the DSM-5, “Emerging Methods and Models.”

About the Presenter:

Dr. Greg J. Neimeyer is professor of psychology in the Department of Psychology at the University of Florida where he currently teaches the doctoral course on Psychodiagnosis (DSM-5 and ICD) and has served both as Director of Clinical Training and as Graduate Coordinator. A Fellow of the American Psychological Association, he is also a recipient of its Award for Outstanding Contributions to Career and Personality Research. Dr. Neimeyer has published over 200 articles and 10 books, with an emphasis on aspects of professional training and development.  A former Chair of the Executive Board of the Council of Counseling Psychologists in the United States, Dr. Neimeyer has also been elected as a Fellow to the Academy of Distinguished Teaching Scholars.  With a specialty interest in the area of psychodiagnosis, Dr. Neimeyer was invited by the American Psychiatric Association to attend its recent convention in San Francisco and to complete its DSM-5 "Train-the Trainers" institute, where he also attended the DSM-5 Work Group reports on the nature and rationale underlying the most recent revisions of the manual.  Dr. Neimeyer currently divides his time between the University of Florida, where he has maintained a practice in the Family Practice Medical Residency Training Program, and Washington, D.C., where he directs the Office of Continuing Education in Psychology at the American Psychological Association.

Pre-Conference # 2 - Moving Your Institution to Best Practice: Understanding Primary Elements of a Comprehensive Alcohol, Other Drug and Violence Prevention Plan

Thursday, January 16th • 09.00 AM – 12.00 PM

From new professionals, to professionals new to campus prevention teams, this session will take a galaxy-level review of how alcohol, other drug and violence (AODV) prevention has evolved and the current state of prevention efforts for colleges and universities. Attendees will build an understanding of the spectrum of alcohol, other drug and violence prevention. Covered topics will include building a campus coalition or workgroup to address prevention, assessment, compliance concerns, environmental management, and the SAMHSA strategic prevention framework. Each participant will leave this pre-conference session with a workable plan to implement on their home campus.

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About the Presenters:

David Arnold is the Director of Alcohol Abuse and Impaired Driving Prevention Initiatives with The BACCHUS Network.  In that role, he also directs the operations of the Colorado Coalition of Campus Alcohol and Drug Educators (CADE). David has worked in prevention for over 10 years, first as an undergraduate peer educator, than as AOD prevention coordinator at the University of North Texas, University of Texas Arlington and Colorado State University - Pueblo. 

Lisa Currie, MSEd is currently in her seventeenth year as a college health promotion professional, having served as the Director of Health Promotion and Wellness at Northwestern University since 2009; she previously worked at the University of Scranton (PA) and Wesleyan University (CT). Her philosophy on addressing AOD issues is couched in   environmental management and is strongly influenced by her academic background in college student development  Her professional experience includes co-chairing campus-based alcohol prevention coalitions, leading the Biennial Review process, implementing and facilitating the Red Watch Band bystander intervention training and various online AOD education programs, overseeing a comprehensive BASICS program, developing social norms campaigns to address high risk drinking, developing countless outreach programs and trainings on AOD issues for peer educators, student leaders, staff, faculty and community partners, and serving as team leader for NU’s Campus Improvement Team for the Dartmouth-led Learning Collaborative on High Risk Drinking in 2011-2013. Having spent her entire career as a peer health education advisor, she also assisted with the development of the BACCHUS Network’s Certified Peer Educator Training and is currently contributing to new resource development for peer education advisors. She holds a Certificate in Alcohol Prevention Leadership from NASPA and EverFi.

Eric S. Davidson, Ph.D., MCHES, CSADP currently serves as the Associate Director for the Eastern Illinois University Health Service, the Director for the Illinois Higher Education Center for Alcohol, Other Drug, and Violence Prevention, and serves the Eastern Illinois University Vice-President of Student Affairs in assessment, evaluation, and research matters. He possesses 18 years of experience in substance abuse prevention and health promotion in higher education settings.  He currently serves as Area 4 Consultant for the BACCHUS Peer Education Network and is a member of the peer education advisor resource development committee.  Dr. Davidson is also a member of the American College Health Association's Alcohol and Drug Task Force, the NASPA Alcohol and Other Drug and Health in Higher Education Knowledge Community, and the Illinois Suicide Prevention Alliance.  Previously, he has served as the BACCHUS Illinois State Coordinator, The Illinois State Coordinator for the Network Addressing Collegiate Alcohol and Other Drug Issues, Secretary of the American College Health Association's Health Promotion Section, and the 2007 President of the Illinois Society for Public Health Education.  Through the Illinois Higher Education Center, Eric has provided technical assistance and support to several colleges implementing environmental strategies and coalitions to address alcohol and other drug abuse.

Pre-Conference # 3 – Wellness and Health Promotion Directors’ Pre-Conference Workshop

Thursday, January 16th • 09.00 AM – 12.00 PM

Targeting Wellness and Health Promotion Directors (WHPD), this pre-conference workshop and the corresponding tracked sessions will provide an opportunity for primary leaders of campus health promotion and wellness efforts to use the “Ottawa Charter on Health Promotion,” the “Institute of Medicine Prevention Protractor,” and other foundational tools to increase knowledge and understanding of effective and innovative primary prevention and wellness strategies and the organizational models needed to support risk reduction and wellness enhancement, from a prevention perspective.

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Learning Objectives:

The participants will be able to:

  1. Utilize varying sources and types of data to drive the conversations, collaborations, and priorities on your campus
  2. Identify specific collaborations critical for broadening responsibility for health, prevention, and wellness initiatives
  3. Interpret population specific data and peer-reviewed literature to guide their health promotion, prevention, and wellness departments
  4. Provide examples of campuses using evidence-based (informed) practice as a cornerstone of their primary prevention programs
  5. Apply standards in service evaluation, strategic planning, resource allocation, and program infrastructure assessment
  6. Articulate the paradigms, opportunities and challenges inherent with both student development and public health professionals on staff

Pre-Conference # 4 - Motivational Interviewing: Brief Evidence-based Counseling for Substance Abuse and Health Behavior Change

Thursday, January 16th • 09.00 AM – 12.00 PM

This workshop will incorporate theory, research, and practice of motivational interviewing (MI) for reducing high-risk behaviors and improving health. MI is an evidence-based, brief technique for eliciting behavior change by helping clients explore and resolve ambivalence. We will provide useful, effective and brief strategies such as: four key processes; working with resistance; and recognizing, maintaining and facilitating change. The presenters have published MI research, created and managed MI based programs and trained student affairs professionals and students in MI techniques.

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Learning Objectives:

  1. Participants understand the philosophy and basic theory of motivational interviewing.
  2. Participants will learn core techniques involved in implementing MI and improve their skills in applying these techniques alcohol and substance use, as well as other health choices and behaviors.
  3. Participants will gain information about the empirical evidence base for motivational interviewing and the current state of the research in this area.

Presenters:

Jerry Phelps, Psychologist, University of California, San Diego

Monique Crandal, Psychologist, University of California, San Diego

Pre-Conference # 5 - Building a Comprehensive & Sustainable Campus Suicide Prevention Program

Thursday, January 16th • 09.00 AM – 12.00 PM

To address the critical issue of suicide among college students, it is important to consider expanding our traditional scope of mental health services and implement a comprehensive approach that reaches the broader campus culture as well as students who are at risk. This workshop will highlight and explore strategies and best practices associated with building comprehensive, sustainable suicide prevention programs within college and university settings. Using experiences and lessons learned from four Garrett Lee Smith Campus Suicide Prevention Program grantees, we will explore prevention and intervention strategies informed by the public health approach and will examine the ways in which campus suicide prevention programs can establish a solid framework that will help them operate with a clear mission and focus, a safe, integrated, and effective service model, and a strong and sustainable core. Representatives from the SAMHSA Center for Mental Health Services, the Jed Foundation, and the Suicide Prevention Resource Center will identify and explore available programs and services to support colleges and universities in the development and implementation of comprehensive suicide prevention programs.

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Learning Objectives:

  1. Identify and describe the seven elements of the Suicide Prevention Resource Center and Jed Foundation Comprehensive Suicide Prevention Model based on the public health approach;
  2. Describe the key elements of comprehensive suicide prevention strategies implemented within four college and university campuses representing diverse demographic characteristics and explain how these programs have been institutionalized and sustained over time;
  3. Identify the goals and objectives of the Garrett Lee Smith Campus Suicide Prevention Grant Program, the Jed Foundation, and the Suicide Prevention Resource Center, and explore the ways that these programs assist and support campuses in building, evaluating, and sustaining comprehensive campus suicide prevention initiatives.

Presenters:

M. Dolores Cimini, Assistant Director for Prevention and Program Evaluation, University at Albany, SUNY

Rosalyn Blogier, Public Health Advisory Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA)

Joy Himmel, Director of Health & Wellness, Penn State University - Altoona

Shelly Rutz Maxwell, Clinical Social Worker/UMatter Program Coordinator, University of Wisconsin - Oshkosh

Victor Schwartz, Medical Director, The Jed Foundation

Wendy Winger, Program Manager, The Ohio State Suicide Prevention Program, The Ohio State University

Pre-Conference # 6 - Sexual Assault Prevention: Fostering a Positive Campus Sexual Culture

Thursday, January 16th • 09.00 AM – 12.00 PM

Traditional sexual assault prevention strategies are often well-intentioned but poorly grounded; even when well-executed, they can exacerbate problematic dynamics. For example, many programs focus on teaching students clearer communication skills, and yet current research demonstrates convincingly that sexual assault is not caused by miscommunication. In fact, feigned misunderstanding is a common tactic of coercion – and so programs that reinforce the myth of miscommunication may end up empowering predators. The Pre-conference workshop will synthesize key aspects of current professional knowledge, then offer specific examples of prevention strategies that build upon that knowledge. The shift to targeted primary prevention work helps address the “too little, too late” problem that has plagued anti-violence work. Through trainings, workshops, and conversation, students are able to identify troublesome dynamics and develop skills for effective interventions overview of a long-term project to reduce sexual misconduct by fostering a more positive campus sexual culture. Based in research on dynamics of sexual violence and sexual culture, the project utilizes intervention methodology, in which peer educators identify worrisome dynamics and work collaboratively to shift them. The focus is on primary prevention, shifting community norms and practices, with secondary attention to helping individuals develop habits of sexual mindfulness.

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Learning Objectives:

  1. Identify elements of campus sexual culture that contribute to sexual misconduct.
  2. Recognize the negative impact of traditional sexual violence prevention tactics that inadvertently strengthen problematic campus dynamics.
  3. Define and practice positive intervention strategy: using student educators to transform campus sexual culture.

Presenters:

Melanie Boyd, Assistant Dean of Student Affairs, Yale College

Hannah Peck, Director of Student Affairs, Yale University

Garrett Fiddler, Student Affairs Fellow, Yale University

Matt Breuer, Student/Peer Educator, Yale University

Registration

Online registration for the 2014 NASPA Alcohol, Other Drug Abuse & Violence Prevention Conference is now CLOSED.  If you are still interested in registering for the conference, you will need to bring your payment onsite to the Loews Coronado Resort Hotel.  You may also register for pre-conference workshops onsite. 

Please be sure to come down early on Thursday to register onsite for either the overall conference or for a pre-conference workshop.  Registration opens on Thursday, January 16, 2014 at 7:30 a.m. in the Atrium of the Loews.

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Registration as a member is based on individual membership status. If you are employed by a college or university that is an institutional member, you can join as an individual member at the $75 rate. If your institution is NOT a member, then you will need to join at the associate affiliate rate of $242 and then you can pay the individual member rate for conference registration. This gives you the conference registration and a year of membership for less than the non-member registration fee. Visit the Membership section of the NASPA website to learn about membership types.


Registration Fees

Registration Type Early-Bird before 11/22/2013 Regular 11/23/2013 to 12/13/2013 Late after 12/13/2013
Full Registration
NASPA Member $395 $445 $520
Non-Member $595 $645 $720
NASPA Student Member $100 $155 $205
Pre-Conference Workshops $65 $85 $85

Questions?

Stephanie Gordon
Vice President of Educational Programs
Email: sgordon@naspa.org
Phone: 202-265-7500, ext. 1166

Policies

View Registration Policies

Group Registration:
NASPA offers discounts for attendees registering in groups of two or more individuals. To apply for this discount please contact NASPA at office@naspa.org. Please include in the email your name, the conference you're registering for, your institution name, and how many individuals you're registering. Our membership department will contact you once they've received this information.

Purchase Orders: 
Purchase orders will NOT be accepted for registration. There is now a Bill Me option online if you need to submit paperwork to your accounting office to have a check cut for your registration payment. Please use that option when registering online. Payments must be received by the appropriate deadline. If payments are not received by the registration deadlines, the appropriate late fee will be assessed.

Cancellation Policy:
Refunds will be given for cancellations, received in writing by December 13, 2013, less a $50.00 processing fee. In addition, a processing fee of $50.00 per registration will be charged for credit cards declined or to change payment methods after the initial payment is processed. With prior approval, anyone registered but who cannot attend may send a substitute. Substitution information must come in writing from the registered participant. The membership status of the substitute must be the same as the registrant in order to have the same registration fee applied. Additional charges may apply if the membership status is not the same. The Conference may be cancelled or postponed due to unforeseen circumstances. In this case, fees will be refunded; however, NASPA will not be responsible for additional costs, charges, or expenses, including cancellation/change charges assessed by airlines, hotels, and/or travel agencies.  NASPA is not responsible for weather-related travel delays or other issues in regard to personal travel and no refunds will be given due to these occurrences.

NOTE: All requests for cancellation and refunds must be in writing to refund@naspa.org. Due to our food and beverage requirements, no refunds will be granted after December 13, 2013. Questions? Contact the NASPA office at 202-265-7500 or via e-mail at office@naspa.org.

Speakers


Pamela S. Hyde, J.D.

Pamela S. Hyde, J.D.

Administrator, SAMHSA

Pamela Hyde was nominated by President Barack Obama and confirmed by the U.S. Senate in November 2009 as Administrator of the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA), a public health agency within the Department of Health and Human Services. The agency’s mission is to reduce the impact of substance abuse and mental illness on America’s communities.

Ms. Hyde is an attorney and comes to SAMHSA with more than 35 years experience in management and consulting for public healthcare and human services agencies. She has served as a state mental health director, state human services director, city housing and human services director, as well as CEO of a private non-profit managed behavioral healthcare firm. In 2003 she was appointed cabinet secretary of the New Mexico Human Services Department by Gov. Bill Richardson, where she worked effectively to provide greater access to quality health services for everyone.


Ms. Hyde is a member of or has served as a consultant to many national organizations, including the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation, the American College of Mental Health Administration, the President’s New Freedom Commission on Mental Health and the United States Department of Justice. She has been recognized by many groups, including the American Medical Association, the National Governor’s Association and the Seattle Management Association, for her creativity and leadership in policy and program development and in organizational management issues. She has received special acknowledgment for her ability to build teams, develop coalitions and consensus, develop strategic plans that form the basis for action and achieve identified goals in a constantly changing environment.


Ms. Hyde received her J.D. from the University of Michigan Law School (1976) and her B.A. from Missouri State University (1972).

Dr. Susan F. Tapert

Dr. Susan F. Tapert

Professor, UCSD Department of Psychiatry

Dr. Tapert’s research focuses on brain functioning in adolescents with substance use disorders, using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), functional MRI, diffusion tensor imaging, and neuropsychological testing. She also evaluates brain functioning in youth at risk for substance use disorders, typical adolescent brain development, and gender differences. Recent work has focused on longitudinal relationships between brain functioning and the progression of substance involvement, including the formation of alcohol and drug expectancies, coping skills, and brain response to substance-related stimuli to investigate the neural substrates of cue reactivity and craving. She has been awarded ten research grants from the National Institutes of Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism and the National Institute on Drug Abuse, in 2008 was honored with the APA Division 50 Distinguished Scientific Early Career Contribution Award, and in 2010 was elected to Fellow status in the American Psychological Association.  Dr. Tapert is Chief of the Psychology Service in the VA San Diego Healthcare System, and a clinical psychologist licensed in the state of California.

Dr. Melissa Lewis

Dr. Melissa Lewis

Associate Professor, University of Washington

Melissa A. Lewis, Ph.D., is an Associate Professor in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at the University of Washington. Dr. Lewis’ substantive research interests lie in examining social psychological principles in broadly defined health-related behaviors. She studies social and motivational mechanisms involved in etiology and prevention of addictive and high-risk behaviors (e.g., drinking, risky sexual behavior, hooking up). She has particular expertise in personalized feedback interventions aimed at reducing drinking and related risky sexual behavior. Mechanisms in which she is interested include normative perceptions and protective behavioral strategies. Dr. Lewis also explores who might be more prone to take part in high-risk health behaviors, such as those who are more sensitive to social pressures. A fundamental assumption of her research is that because social pressures and influences have been consistently and strongly implicated in risky health behaviors, especially among adolescents and young adults, interventions aiming to reduce susceptibility to these influences hold particular promise. Dr. Lewis has published over 60 peer-reviewed journal articles. She has previously been awarded the Addictive Behaviors Special Interest Group Early Career Award of the Association for Behavior and Cognitive Therapies, a Division 50 of the American Psychological Association Early Career Presentation Award, and two early career poster travel awards from Division 50 of the American Psychological Association and NIAAA. She has received grants from the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, the Alcohol and Drug Abuse Institute, and the Alcohol Beverage Medical Research Foundation.

Sponsors

For sponsorship and exhibitor information, please contact Fred Comparato, Director of Corporate Relations.

Interested in becoming a sponsor or exhibitor?

For sponsorship and exhibit booth questions, contact:

Fred Comparato
fcomparato@naspa.org
Phone: 614-204-5994

Venue

All conference activities will take place at the Loews Coronado Bay.


Loews Coronado Bay
4000 Coronado Bay
Coronado, CA 92118
619-424-4000
Website

Centered between the Pacific Ocean and Coronado Bay, Loews Coronado Bay Resort epitomizes the true Southern California lifestyle. We are pleased to announce completion of a comprehensive redesign of our lobby, Bay Terrace, Cays Lounge, Market Café and Market-to-Go. Taking full advantage of the resort’s waterfront location, the new design artfully combines San Diego’s sun and surf with the casual charm of southern California.

The Loews Coronado Bay has arranged special room rates for conference attendees, starting at $194 (not including 11.5% local taxes).  Reservations must be made by Monday, December 16, 2013.  Please make your reservations as soon as possible, as hotel blocks tend to sell out for NASPA conferences!

PLEASE NOTE: The NASPA room block at the Loews Coronado Bay is completely SOLD OUT.

We have been able to secure a small room block at the Hotel Del Coronado with a room rate of $219 per night (not including 10.68% state and local taxes).  The Hotel Del Coronado is approximately 4 miles away from the Loews Coronado Bay.   NASPA will not provide transportation to/from the Hotel Del.
Please call 1-800-468-3533 to make your reservations at the Hotel Del Coronado. 

Hotel Del Coronado
1500 Orange Avenue
Coronado, CA 92118
Reservations: 1-800-468-3533

Please note that NASPA is not providing transportation to and from the Loews Coronado Bay to any properties in the area.  Availability at the conference hotel can change at any time.  If you would like to try and reserve a room at the Loews Coronado Bay, please contact the hotel directly for any availability updates.  Please keep in mind, when contacting the Loews Coronado Bay, the NASPA room rate may not be available. 

  • Travel

    San Diego is serviced by San Diego International Airport (SAN). The Loews is located approximately 20 minutes from the airport.

  • Transportation

    Shuttles
    Please visit the Airport Shuttle page of the SAN website for more information.

    Taxis
    If you are in need of a taxi, simply follow the signs to the Transportation Plazas. A Transportation Coordinator will place you with the first available taxi.

    Car Rentals
    For a list of available car rental providers and contact information, please visit the Car Rental page of the SAN website.

  • Weather

    Temperatures in January are approximately 65 degrees F during the day. Please visit the Weather Channel website before you travel for the most up to date information regarding weather.

Additional Info

Parking:
The Loews Coronado Bay is offering self parking to all NASPA members for a discounted rate of $15/day over the program dates of Tuesday, January 14 - Sunday, January 19, 2014.

We hope that you will explore San Diego, when not busy with the conference or if you arrive in the city before the program begins. There are plenty of things to do and see if you are a first-time visitor or even if you have been to San Diego many times. The official tourism website for San Diego is one of many online resources available to visitors.

Attire
The dress for NASPA events is business casual.

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