2014 NASPA Assessment and Persistence Conference

June 19 – June 21, 2014
Hyatt Regency - San Antonio, Texas

The 2014 NASPA Assessment & Persistence Conference is designed to promote student learning and success by strengthening assessment, improving educational quality, and developing intentional persistence programming.

Register Online

About

Institutional leadership must create an environment which builds capacity, as well as encourage an organizational culture that includes comprehensive assessment as part of strategic planning.  Similarly, institutional leaders have a unique role to play in providing an environment and education that encourages student persistence, especially for under-served, low-income, adult, part-time, and minority students. 

 The NASPA Assessment & Persistence Conference has been designed to address these important issues in assessment and persistence, as well as to provide a forum for experienced professionals to advance their skills by discussing assessment and persistence with practitioners and policy-makers.

Attend this conference to:

  • Explore student learning in relation to institutional assessment and persistence practices
  • Build a culture of assessment on campus
  • Advance skills, build knowledge, and gain a depth of understanding in assessment practices
  • Facilitate student engagement and success through intentional persistence programming
  • Improve retention, persistence, and achievement for all students, especially minority, low-income, adult, part-time, and under-served students. 

Institutional Team Attendance

NASPA encourages institutional team attendance at this event.  By having a multidisciplinary team, colleges and universities increase the probability of successfully implementing improved assessment and persistence programs when they get back to campus.  The best assessment of student learning and outcomes requires collaboration from both academic and student affairs. The committee encourages campuses to send representatives from the following areas in order to allow for substantive conversations around how to create change on your campus:

  • Chief Student Affairs Officers
  • Student Affairs Educators
  • Provosts
  • Faculty Members
  • Academic Affairs Administrators
  • Educational Researchers
  • Institutional Researchers
  • Testing Officers
  • Assessment Professionals
CONTINUING EDUCATION
Image of the NBCC logo and link to the NBCC homepage
National Board of Certified Counselors 

NASPA is an NBCC-Approved Continuing Education Provider (ACEP™) and may offer NBCC-approved clock hours for events that meet NBCC requirements. The ACEP™ solely is responsible for all aspects of the program. Forms and information will be provided at the conference. 

Presented By


Audience

This event is most likely to influence these groups.

  • Chief Student Affairs Officer
  • Mid-Level
  • AVP or “Number Two”
  • Faculty
  • New Professional

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Call for Programs

Conference Themes and Tracks

The conference planning committee is seeking proposals under both the assessment theme and the persistence theme. Presenters for both the assessment and persistence theme will be asked to identify the intended audience for their session; beginner, intermediate and advanced. Additionally, given the strong practical connection between assessment and persistence, the conference planning committee will select programs that demonstrate the integration of assessment and persistence for student learning and success.

Assessment Theme

The NASPA Assessment & Persistence Conference has been designed to address emerging issues in assessment, provide the fundamentals to those who are new to the field as well as a forum for experienced assessment professionals to advance their skills by discussing assessment with practitioners, scholars, and policy-makers.  The conference planning committee will select programs that relate to the conference themes and that relate to persistence and retention.   

Persistence Theme

 The NASPA Assessment & Persistence Conference has been designed to address current issues in student persistence in higher education and connect the assessment of student learning to persistence and completion.  The conference planning committee will select program proposals from various institutional types from community colleges to small colleges as well as large universities that provide institution-wide, proven interventions that connect student learning to persistence.  The committee also seeks to highlight programs that share persistence strategies for first generation, low-income, minority, adult, part-time, transfer, veteran and other often under-served students.  

Conference Themes & Suggested Topics

  • Fundamentals of Assessment

    Effective assessment becomes easier to understand and manage when it is based on a solid foundation of knowledge.  Sessions in this theme provide"primer" sessions that teach basic concepts and provide a foundational understanding of outcomes assessment.  Sessions in this theme may include the following topics:

    • What is the philosophical purpose of assessment and common terms used in assessment practice?
    • How does one write institutional, departmental and activity level learning outcomes?         
    • What are the ethical, institutional, and political issues in assessment method implementation, analysis and reporting?
    • How does a student affairs division begin an assessment process?
    • What can be done to engage and train staff in quality assessment implementation?

  • Assessment Methods and Measurements

    Determining the mode or method appropriate for the assessment process depends on many factors: the purpose of the project and the intended use of the results; the relative importance and sensitivity of the learning experience being assessed; and the resources available. Proper implementation of the method chosen to measure an outcome is of vital importance.  The sessions in this learning theme should focus on the following topics:

    How do you create and design institution-specific surveys?

    How to use different methods to measure outcomes including:

    • Case studies
    • Reflection sessions
    • Portfolios
    • Interviews/Focus Groups
    • National Datasets / Institutional Research Data

    How to use different data analysis techniques, including:

    • Quantitative
    • Qualitative
    • Content Analysis
    • Rubrics

  • The Role of Data in Institutional Decision Making

    The assessment cycle far too often ends at the point of collection or analysis of data;  the purpose of the process is to make decisions based on data collected. The sessions in this learning theme are advanced concepts that will focus on the following topics:

    • How does data change decisions on policy, procedures and staffing?
    • How does the assessment process change the way faculty and student affairs educators document learning?
    • What are the best and most effective ways to develop, collect, analyze and act upon evidence of student learning?
    • How do faculty and student affairs administrators develop information about the achievement of learning outcomes? How it is communicated to internal and external stakeholders?

  • Institutional Persistence & Retention Initiatives, Financial Aid, & Enrollment Management

    This learning theme highlights institutional efforts to support persistence and student retention initiatives from a variety of institutional types to showcase specific, successful programs.  Session topics may include:

    • How do programs and services improve student retention/persistence? (e.g Orientation, First year and transfer students; Advising and Academic Support programs; Honors programs for high achieving students)
    • What early alert/early intervention programs have proven successful in student persistence?
    • How does strategic enrollment management affect or influence student persistence and completion?
    • How do faculty and student affairs educators provide engaging experiences for all students in order to improve persistence and completion?
    • What are the ethical, political and institutional challenges of managing a culture that encourages an institution-wide focus on persistence?

  • Persistence of Special Student Populations

    This learning theme highlights institutional efforts to support persistence and student retention initiatives for specific and diverse student populations including first generation, low-income, minority, adult, part-time, transfer, veteran and other often under-served students.  Session topics may include:

    • What programs/services have demonstrated improvement in persistence for diverse student populations?
    • What collaborations exist with athletics, Greek life, international students, or other special student populations?
    • How do collaborations between administrative functions support institution-wide persistence and completion efforts? (Examples might include TRIO, NCAA, Student-at-Risk programs and other administrative units.)
    • What programs or services are in place for assisting the completion rate for students with disabilities? 

  • Integrated Assessment, Persistence, and Retention Practices

    Higher education leaders must create an infrastructure that can support an integrated assessment and persistence practices. The session in this theme connect assessment and persistence in a variety of ways:

    • How have assessment efforts improved student learning, persistence and completion?
    • What are the best and most effective ways to develop, collect, analyze and act upon evidence of student learning and persistence?
    • How do educators document learning in the curriculum and co-curriculum?
    • How can assessment data be used to improve student retention and persistence?



Submission Timeline
  • November 13, 2013
    Call for Programs Opens
  • January 17, 2014
    Call for Program Reviewers Closes
  • February 10, 2014
    Call for Programs Closes
  • March 10, 2014
    Program Notifications Sent
  • March 17, 2014
    Program Confirmation Required
  • March 28, 2014
    Schedule Posted Online

Writing Tips

Looking for tips on writing an effective NASPA proposal? See sample submissions and formatting tips in our Program Submission Guidelines.

Questions?

Please contact NASPA if you have any further questions about submitting a program proposal for the 2014 NASPA Assessment and Persistence Conference.

Lucy Fort
Assistant Director of Educational Programs
Phone: (202) 719-1171
Email: lfort@naspa.org

Schedule

Click here to download a PDF version of the schedule. PLEASE NOTE: This schedule is updated as of 5/30/2014 and is subject to change. 

Day 1 Thu, Jun 19
8:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.
Conference Registration
9:00 a.m. - 12:00 p.m.
Pre-conference Workshops
Details

You must be registered to attend pre-conference workshops. Workshops are an additional fee.

Rio Grande East
Assessment Revolution: A How-To Guide for Jumpstarting a Culture Change

Nathan Lindsay, Assistant Vice Provost for Assessment, University of Missouri-Kansas City

Details

In response to accreditation standards, institutional mandates, and heightened student needs, many institutions are struggling to initiate best practices for assessment on their campus. This pre-conference will feature the key elements needed for an assessment culture change, provide practice in the essential skill of writing good learning outcomes, and then highlight several data collection methods. If you are seeking to develop a game plan for energizing or re-energizing your institution’s assessment initiatives, then this is the right session for you!

Rio Grande West
A Persistence Focused Student Concerns System: A Next Generation Behavioral Intervention Team

Vince Diller, Assistant Dean of Students, Belmont University

Details

In an innovative shift from a centralized “student at risk” intervention plan, to a university retention and persistence system highlighting high-touch, student centered advising and resourcing. This model’s architecture and philosophy provide a safe and efficient assessment of safety concerns and academic risk, then timely referral to the best relationship capable of assisting the student concern. This highly interactive workshop will review participating institutions’ and Belmont University’s experience in building retention and persistence programs and compare/contrast benefits of the presented model. This session will be presented by Vince Diller, Assistant Dean of Students at Belmont University.

1:30 p.m. - 1:45 p.m.
Regency Ballroom
Welcome & Opening Remarks

Kevin Kruger, President, NASPA

1:45 p.m. - 2:30 p.m.
Opening Plenary Session
Regency Ballroom
Using Assessment to Promote Student Development

Dr. Alexander W. Astin, Ph.D., Allan M. Carter Professor Emeritus of Higher Education , University of California, Los Angeles

Details

If assessment data are to be used to enhance student learning and development, several different types of data need to be gathered. Dr. Astin will discuss a systematic framework for gathering and utilizing assessment data, with particular emphasis on the difficult question of assessing “affective” outcomes.

2:45 p.m. - 3:45 p.m.
Concurrent Sessions
Rio Grande Center
Keeping Score: Establishing Meaningful Accountability in Student Center and Academic Affairs

Randall Brumfield, Director, Undergraduate Advising Center, University of Kansas

Details

Student affairs and academic affairs units all too often attempt to define success via retention and graduation rates. A balanced scorecard approach helps managers and practitioners develop and track goals based on benchmarks and outcomes specific to the service rendered. Inasmuch, this session seeks to provide guidance on setting appropriate and measurable metrics for success.

Blanco/Llano
How Can Student Affairs Professionals Support Working-Class Women to Achieve Degrees at Elite Institutions?

Jennifer O'Connor Duffy, Dissertaiton Chair Manager, Northcentral University

Details

Researchers, who like me, have gained from the women’s movement need to remain active on behalf of other women who have not yet benefited educationally. Although there may be data to chart the extent and the effects of retention for women from low-income backgrounds, this historical perspective highlights the generational experiences of working-class women, enabling current higher education practitioners and student affairs administrators to examine how much progress has been made in the last half century to retain and accommodate the particular needs of women from low-income backgrounds.

Regency East
Driving Student Success

Renee Delgado-Riley, Program Planning Officer, The University of New Mexico
Tim Schroeder, Director, STEM Gateway, The University of New Mexico
Carolina Aguirre, Director, STEM UP, The University of New Mexico
Vicky Morris-Dueer, Senior Institutional Researcher, The University of New Mexico
Rosa Cervantes, Director, El Centro de La Raza, The University of New Mexico
Kiran Katira, Director, Community Engagement Center, The University of New Mexico

Details

This session will describe a strategic process established within student services to align its assessment/student data tracking with institutional/state-wide student success outcomes. Directors from student services in collaboration with the provost’s office and the Office of Institutional Analytics developed a long-term solution for tracking student data. Student services is dedicated to working with first-generation, low-income, and traditionally underrepresented groups from early childhood through college, graduate school, and career planning. Key Performance Indicators (KPIs) and a data repository system were developed.

Rio Grande East
Towards a Socially Just View of Student Affairs Assessment

Daniel Newhart, Director of Student Affairs Research, Evaluation and Planning, Oregon State University
Sophie Tullier, Research Analyst, The Ohio State University

Details

We argue that social justice is a critical component of student affairs assessment, from the formation of the question to the final report. Considering justice at the center allows us to consider the assessment design differently, especially in projects that involve underrepresented populations. In this session, we provide a framework for applying social justice to student affairs assessment and practical tips on how to integrate this thinking into the assessment process in such a way to honor the participants.

Chula Vista
More Than a Respondent: Engaging Students in Conducting Assessments

Paulina Abaunza, Associate Director, Student Resource Center, New York University
Sonia DeLuca Fernandez, Director, Research and Assessment for Student Affairs, New York University

Details

Involving students in conducting assessment activities contributes to creating a culture of assessment in student affairs divisions, enhances student “buy-in,” augments student engagement, facilitates student learning, and improves the quality of the assessment process. In this session we will review our approach to addressing the logistic, ethical, and institutional issues when involving students, and we provide examples and suggestions for engaging students in student affairs assessment

Nueces/Frio
Using Rubrics to Assess Student Learning: A Tool for Student Affairs Professionals Too!

Emily Langdon, Coordinator, Assessment, Research, & Evaluation, University of California, Merced
Laura Martin, Coordinator, Institutional Assessment, University of California, Merced
Kristin Hlubik, Coordinator, Health Promotions, University of California, Merced
Hector Sambolin, Assistant Director, Bright Success Center, University of California, Merced

Details

Student affairs professionals are being called to collect more direct evidence of student learning outside the classroom. Understanding how to use a rubric to measure student learning can make the idea of direct evidence less daunting. This workshop will introduce multiple types of rubrics and ways they can be used to collect direct evidence of student learning in the co-curriculum. Participants will practice scoring and norming using a rubric designed to measure the quality of student staff members’ incident reports.

Live Oak
Data Driven Decision-Making: Using Assessment Data to Support Persistence of Underrepresented Students

Marjorie Dorime-Williams, Director of Academic Assessment, Baruch College
Michael Williams, Doctoral Candidate/Graduate Research Associate, The Ohio State University

Details

Assessment of academic programs and student learning has become increasingly important. While it is acknowledged that assessment of student learning should be done, making productive use of data is often a challenge. Faculty, administrators, and educators struggle to translate data into practical strategies that improve student outcomes, such as retention or academic growth. This presentation seeks to introduce participants to ways that assessment can be used to shape policies that impact student outcomes.

Rio Grande West
Reframing Retention and Persistence as a University-wide Initiative

Tom Fritz, Engagement Director, Michigan State University

Details

Who is responsible for institutional retention? The provost? The president? Or should it be more integrated into the day-to-day operations of an institution? In this presentation, we will examine how a large, public institution reframed retention, persistence, and student success initiatives and changed the organizational culture to refocus everyone’s attention on student success.

4:00 p.m. - 5:00 p.m.
Presidential Suite
CSAO Only Reception
Details

Chief Student Affairs Officers are invited to attend a reception with Dr. Alexander Astin. Light refreshments will be provided.

4:00 p.m. - 5:00 p.m.
Concurrent Sessions
Rio Grande East
Beyond Benchmarking and Satisfaction: Using NASPA Consortium Surveys to Examine Learning

Kristyn Muller, Apartment Coordinator, University at Albany

Details

Do more with your survey data! Learn how existing NASPA Consortium results were used to examine the impact of involvement on institution-specific learning dimensions. Applicable survey questions were matched with corresponding learning domains to show students’ perceived learning attainment. The average scores of freshman and senior students were compared to demonstrate the influence of involvement over time. By linking NASPA Consortium data to learning, an institution can gain a new perspective on the effectiveness of their students’ involvement.

Live Oak
Using Data to Increase Student Persistence

Kathleen Karran-McCoy, Student Services Manager, Palm Beach State College
Karline Prophete, Student Services Manager, Palm Beach State College
Penny McIsaac, Dean, Student Services, Palm Beach State College

Details

Academic institutions boast a strong focus on strategic plans for student success but few practice it in their daily connections with students. During this session, the presenters will utilize institutional data to discuss some dilemmas faced by two year colleges in the areas of Student Services and how they affect everyday practices. While strength lies in adhering to the “open access” mission of community colleges, there seems to be a growing conflict between its historical mission and its future course.

Rio Grande Center
Promoting Learning and Persistence of URM Students in STEM through Dynamic Assessment Frameworks

Hannah Whang, Research Analyst, University of California Los Angeles
Brit Toven-Lindsey, Research Analyst, University of California, Los Angeles
Michael Soh, Research Analyst, University of California, Los Angeles
Casey Shapiro, Post-Doctoral Scholar, University of California, Los Angeles
Marc Levis-Fitzgerald, Director of Survey Research and Curriculum Assessment, University of California, Los Angeles

Details

Assessment frameworks have provided administrators and faculty with student data on learning, engagement, and satisfaction. These evolving frameworks have integrated this student-driven feedback; leading to tailored teaching methods and student services, particularly for underrepresented minority populations, and efficient collaboration amongst institutional units. Given this, it is imperative that institutions better understand how various assessment methods can inform curricular and programmatic changes. This session will share three dynamic, multi-pronged assessment plans at various stages of development and implementation.

Chula Vista
Transformative Progressive and Intentional: Supporting the Persistence of Students of Color through Integrative Assessment Practices

Dametraus Jaggers, Associate Director for Retention and Student Engagement, Office of Multicultural Student Life, University of Tennessee, Knoxville

Details

This presentation will share strategies for developing integrative and intentional assessment practices to strengthen a peer mentoring program designed to support the retention and graduation of students of color, at a predominately white institution. The presenter will shed light on how assessments results were used to “close the loop” and implement new components into the peer mentoring program to further enhance student success and persistence.

Rio Grande West
Study Simpler: A Holistic Approach to Study Skills Development

Mitchell Colver, Retention Specialist, Eastern Washington University

Details

Academic success is one component of retention and persistence for colleges and universities. This session, based in empirical study and campus practice highlights a new model of holistic study skills interventions called Study Simpler. This program is a foundation of study skills proficiency for students. The acronym SIMPLER outlines seven of the most influential factors related to student well-being: Space, Intervals, Method, People, Loyalty, Energy, and Resources. These seven holistic categories make up the who, what, when, where, why, and how of student success.

Blanco/Llano
Retention Coordinators: Unifying Academic and Student Affairs to Improve Student Outcomes

Derrick Bullock, Retention Coordinator, College of Professional Studies, Bowie State University
Nichole Mason, Retention Coordinator , College of Business, Bowie State University
Corey McKinney, Retention Coordinator, College of Arts and Sciences, Bowie State University
Jennifer Johnson, Retention Coordinator, College of Education, Bowie State University
Tamisha Jackson, Transition and Retention Specialist, Division of Student Affairs, Bowie State University

Details

Collaboration between academic and student affairs is essential to support the holistic development of students both inside and outside of the classroom. Retention coordinators at Bowie State University (BSU) play a central role in assisting students’ development of the academic competencies needed for success, while fostering opportunities for campus engagement and student leadership. This program highlights strategies for how to empower students to take advantage of campus resources, remain actively involved in student programming, and maximize their educational experience.

Regency East
Beyond The Classroom Matters: Structuring data to assess and improve student involvement

Pam Bowers, Associate Vice-President for Planning, Assessment and Innovation, University of South Carolina
Claire Robinson, Associate Director, Student Success Center, University of South Carolina
Amber Fallucca, Director of Assessment for University Housing, University of South Carolina
Elizabeth White-Hurst, Assessment Coordinator, Department of Student Life, University of South Carolina

Details

There is general agreement in literature and practice that the quantity and quality of college student involvement affects learning and development. However, student involvement in educationally purposeful activities outside the classroom is often not systematically documented by colleges and universities. Presenters will discuss strategy, challenges, and progress on implementation of a new information management system to document student involvement and create a composite record of each student’s holistic educational experience, making more learning experiences visible and providing information for improvement and accountability. This is an NASPA Research Policy Institute sponsored session.

5:15 p.m. - 6:30 p.m.
Evening Panel Discussion
Regency Ballroom
Creating Conditions for Diverse Students to Thrive

Edward Smith, Senior Policy Analyst, NASPA
Lester Manzano, Assistant Dean for Student Academic Affairs, Loyola University Chicago
Dr. Anne-Marie Nunez, Associate Professor of Higher Education, University of Texas at San Antonio
Dr. Samuel D. Museus, Associate Professor of Higher Education, University of Denver

Details

Meeting the academic and social needs of today’s increasingly diverse college student population requires a new vision for institutional leadership and systematic practice. Simultaneously, the diversity of the current student population can call into question the focus on traditional measures of success, such as persistence and degree completion rates. This plenary panel will analyze the challenges and opportunities that institutions face in creating the conditions for all students to thrive. Specifically, panelists will highlight intersections of research and practice and examine how leadership, campus cultures, and support structures reflect the diversity of today’s students. The session will then create space for participants to engage in dialogue about the anticipated challenges they might encounter in pursuing institutional transformation efforts to cultivate the conditions for student thriving and potential supports that can be provided to those who hope to engage in such efforts.

6:30 p.m. - 7:30 p.m.
Regency Ballroom Foyer
Opening Reception
Day 2 Fri, Jun 20
7:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.
Regency Foyer
Conference Registration
7:00 a.m. - 8:15 a.m.
Regency Ballroom Foyer
Continental Breakfast
Details

Pick up your breakfast and join your colleagues for morning roundtable discussions.

7:15 a.m. - 8:15 a.m.
Roundtable Discussions
Rio Grande Center
Learning Communities to Recruit and Retain Students in STEM Majors

Anu Gokhale, Professor, Illinois State University
Kenton Machina, Professor Emeritus, Illinois State University

Details

Research suggests that the perceptions of students, educators, and other stakeholders play a large role in discouraging students, especially women and minorities from pursuing STEM majors and participating in technical occupations. This NSF-funded project utilizes online learning communities and after-class seminars to help students challenge stereotype constraining definitions of “femininity” and “ethnicity” and overcome these barriers. Findings show that these methods do not alienate the majority white males and are effective in recruiting and retaining students into computing-related majors.

Rio Grande West
Student Crisis Intervention: Policies, Procedures, and Persistence

Vince Diller, Assistant Dean of Students at Belmont University

Details

A review of student crisis concern case studies and related policy implications involved with the institution’s response, with a focus on the intervention’s impact to individual and community persistence factors. Participants will identify academic and safety policies involved in these case studies and compare/contrast similar practices at their institution. Participants will experience an increase appreciation for the value of persistence driven policy making and effective intervention strategies in responding to student crisis concerns.

Blanco/Llano
Building the Bridge: Connecting Strategic Planning and Assessment

Tim Kresse, Director, Student Affairs Budget and Technology, Miami University
Gwen Fears, Associate Dean of Students, Miami University

Details

Share with and learn from colleagues on the topic of integrating assessment with strategic planning. Miami University is currently involved in university-wide strategic planning and the individuals leading the process for the division of Student Affairs are also on the division’s assessment committee. This marriage keeps assessment and reporting needs present during the planning process. The presenters will share their experience and ask participants to reflect and share their experiences – good and bad – with strategic planning and assessment integration.

Nueces/Frio
A Practical Guide to Training Student Staff to Assess Their Programs

Whitney Brown, Coordinator of Student Affairs Research, Assessment and Staff Development, University of Alaska Anchorage

Details

Do you struggle to engage your student staff or club leaders in assessing their programs? Acquire tools to effectively articulate the value of assessment to student leaders and demonstrate that conducting assessment can be fun and easy! Circulate stations of various “quick assessment” methods and discover the practical application of each. See how UAA student leaders have integrated assessment into their programming process and have used graffiti boards, mobile iPod surveys, and more to capture student learning and success.

Rio Grande Ballroom East
No Pain, No Gain: Moving from Learning Outcomes to Results

Wallace Southerland, Associate Dean of Students, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Details

Assessment is perceived as arduous and politically-risky. Fears tend to be loss of resources, poor image, or termination. In a climate of accountability, assessment must be done, be demystified, and be collaborative so that gains and pains can be shared. During the session, presenters will share strategies used to begin assessment. A user-friendly electronic assessment tool was created and will be shared. Beginners will have an opportunity to use the tool to test its potential utility on their campuses.

8:30 a.m. - 9:15 a.m.
NASPA Assessment, Evaluation, and Research Knowledge Community Award for Innovation Presentation
Morning Plenary Session
Regency Ballroom
At the intersection: Improving Student Persistence through Effective Student Affairs Assessment

Dr. Luis Ponjuan, Associate Professor of Higher Education Administration, Texas A&M University

Details

This keynote address focuses on understanding the intersection of student affairs assessment practices and student persistence. Relying on the concept of driving through an intersection, this talk focuses on the unique challenges new and veteran student affairs administrators face when creating, sustaining, or renewing student assessment activities. Based on the research literature, this talk will focus on understanding how we can improve student persistence through effective student affairs assessment practices. Dr. Ponjuan will offer a dynamic and engaging talk to inspire, empower, and educate student affairs practitioners to enhance their student assessment acumen.

9:30 a.m. - 11:30 a.m.
Mini-Institutes
Rio Grande West
Beyond Demographics: Developing, Using, and Analyzing Surveys to Improve Persistence

Rishi Sriram, Assistant Professor and Graduate Program Director, Baylor University

Details

Grades, college entrance exam scores, and student demographics all help to predict persistence, but there is so much more to thae complexity of students’ lives and their decisions to stay or go. How do you discover other key elements that may influence the persistence of college students? Teaching and elaborating on NASPA’s Five Things brief on survey development, this mini-institute helps scholar-practitioners create meaningful data that they can use to improve practice. Participants will learn how to select important variables that likely influence persistence, develop a reliable and valid survey to measure those variables, and use the results of the survey for further statistical analysis. The goal of this mini-institute is to guide participants from an idea all the way through making decisions based upon sound data. This is a NASPA Research and Policy Institute sponsored program.

Regency East
Student Assessment Driving School: Applying Student Affairs Assessment to Student Persistence

Dr. Luis Ponjuan, Associate Professor, Higher Education, Texas A&M University

Details

As a student affairs professional, you have to do student assessment all the time, yet you often feel ill equipped, unsure, and uneasy with this type of assessment work. This mini-institute session is designed to help student affairs practitioners move beyond those challenging moments and work towards developing a new confidence in their assessment work. Relying on the metaphor of a driving school, this mini institute extends beyond the keynote address and highlights specific research based concepts so that student affairs practitioners can enhance their student assessment activities with particular focus on student persistence. Dr. Ponjuan will provide a lively and pragmatic discussion of assessment research to help student affairs professionals enrich their student assessment work.

Rio Grande East
Assessment 2.0 – What’s Next?

D'Arcy Oaks, Associate Director for Assessment, and Evaluation, The Ohio State University
Mike Christakis, Assistant Vice President for Student Success, SUNY University at Albany
Ted Elling, Associate Vice Chancellor Student Affairs, University of North Carolina at Charlotte
Darby Roberts, Director of Student Life Studies, Texas A&M University

Details

There’s more to life than surveys and satisfaction! How do student affairs assessment practitioners move beyond the satisfaction survey? The presentation will focus on opportunities for continued growth in the field of student affairs assessment and will highlight innovative assessment techniques and methods to realize a deeper understanding of our student’s co-curricular experiences.

Rio Grande Center
Using Partnerships and Case Strategies to Improve Co-Curricular Student Learning

Marguerite Bonous-Hammarth, Director of Assessment, Research and Evaluation for Student Affairs, University of California-Irvine
Lua Hancock, Assistant Provost for Student Success, Stetson University
Susan Platt, Director of Program Review and Assessment, California State University-Long Beach
Randall Brumfield, Director of the Undergraduate Advising Center, University of Kansas

Details

Members of the Student Affairs Partnering with Academic Affairs (SAPAA) Knowledge Community and colleagues from NASPA present a hands-on mini-institute to enhance the strategic planning and use of assessment data to improve co-curricular student outcomes. The session will use case study, action-oriented conversations from small group discussions, and resource sharing to promote participant assessment skills through partnerships for student and institutional learning.

Live Oak
Toward a More Engaging Campus for All Students: Assessing and Transforming Institutional Environments to Maximize Success among Diverse Populations

Sam Museus, Associate Professor of Higher Education, University of Denver

Details

In this mini-institute, participants will receive an overview of the Culturally Engaging Campus Environments (CECE) Model of College Success and Survey, which delineate the types of campus environments that are necessary for diverse populations to thrive and provide the tools for campuses to assess the extent to which their environments are culturally engaging. Participants will also engage in discussions about how they might be able to utilize the CECE assessment tools to foster dialogue about creating environments of thriving on their campuses, refine their programming and practices so that they can be more culturally engaging, and build campus-wide coalitions to cultivate broader institutional transformation so that their institutions can more effectively serve diverse populations. This is a NASPA Research and Policy Institute sponsored program.

Blanco/Llano
The Why, How, and Other Secrets of Conducting Successful Direct Assessments

Nathan Lindsay, Assistant Vice Provost for Assessment, University of Missouri–Kansas City and Stan Dura, Director, Student Affairs Assessment and Research University of Oregon

Details

What do your students know? What can they do with the skills that they have? The best way to answer these questions is through direct assessments that measure these areas more explicitly and concretely, without relying on self-reported survey data. This hands-on mini-institute features rubrics, quizzes, personal outcomes records, and other direct assessments conducted at several universities. Participants will also have the opportunity to brainstorm possibilities for direct assessment at their own institutions.

11:30 a.m. - 1:00 p.m.
Conference Break (Lunch on Own)
1:00 p.m. - 2:00 p.m.
Concurrent Sessions
Blanco/Llano
Intrusive Advising: The Holy Grail of At-Risk Student Retention?

J. Vincent Nix, Assistant Vice President of Instruction & Student Services, Dawson Community College

Details

In 2011, the J.A. & Kathryn Albertson Foundation (JKAF) funded a three-year Continuous Enrollment (CE) initiative in response to the growing workforce job skills gap in Idaho and the need to meet the post-secondary needs of unconventional students—those working on their GEDs and from alternative high school programs. The goal was to measurably increase access, retention and completion for these students. Progress data collected measured student achievement benchmarks: the percentage of credits earned, GPA, credential goal completion, and continuing enrollment, This session will review these findings and outcomes.

Regency East
What Story Tellers Know that Assessment Committees Can Learn

Rebecca Murray, Client Services Manager, EBI MAP-Works

Details

Higher education faculty and administration are continually called upon to gather assessment data. Collectively, higher education has improved the capacity to compile information. However, this effort often fails to prompt action, change thinking, or demonstrate value. To create a happy ending, faculty and administration need insights from story tellers, who know how to design an impactful story. This session will allow participants to draw on story design elements and theory to provide a framework for developing cohesive and compelling stories.

Rio Grande West
The Roles of Social and Academic Engagement and Perceptions of Belonging in a Model of Student Persistence

Jean Starobin, Associate Director of Administrative Services, University of Florida

Details

This presentation will share the results of a quantitative study that investigated the relationships of academic engagement, social engagement, and perceptions of belonging on retention among first year students at a large, public university. Berger and Milem’s (1999) Causal Model of Student Persistence is utilized as the conceptual framework for this study. Portraits of both retained students and non-retained students were created using institutional demographic data and self-reported data as reported on the spring 2011 Student Experience in the Research University survey (SERU). In addition, the study measured the predictive value of the patterns of academic engagement, extra-curricular activities, perceptions of belonging, and student characteristics relative to retention based on SERU participants’ subsequent enrollment in the fall 2012.

Rio Grande East
Assessing Sense of Community in Residence Halls

Yanmei Zhang, Coordinator Research Programs and Services, University of Florida
Kim Fugate-Roberts, Director, Academic Advising, Career, and Counseling Center, Santa Fe College
Diane Porter-Roberts, Director, Student Personnel in Higher Education Graduate Program, University of Florida

Details

Are students satisfied with the community in their residence hall? Do men and women differ in how they perceive that community? What impact do Living Learning Communities (LLCs) have on the perceived sense of community? This program will share assessment results using the Sense of Community Index – 2 that looked at how students perceive community in residence halls. Research method and findings will be shared. Participants will discuss how to use data to develop campus community.

Nueces/Frio
Assessment is Your Friend:Developing a Divisional Assessment Plan and Culture

Marsha Jackson, Associate Vice President for Student Services, Erie Community College
Nathan Wallace, Assistant Project Coordinator, Erie Community College

Details

During the spring of 2012 Erie Community College’s Division of Student Affairs embarked on an ambitious initiative to create and implement a divisional assessment plan. At the time, assessment was seen in a negative light by many in student affairs due to a history of sporadic and punitive assessment practices. Due to this assessment history, a detailed plan wasn’t enough. A culture of assessment was needed. A culture in which assessment would be seen not as an enemy, but as a friend.

Chula Vista
Zero to Sixty: Jumpstarting a Divisional Assessment Roadmap

Robert Snyder, Executive Director of Planning and Outreach, Division of Student Affairs, The George Washington University
Adam Bethke, Presidential Administrative Fellow, Division of Student Affairs, The George Washington University
Toby Davidow, Coordinator of Planning and Outreach, Division of Student Affairs, The George Washington University
Colby Moss, Area Coordinator, Center for Student Engagement, The George Washington University, Anne Scammon, Managing Director of Curricular and Strategic Initiatives, Center for Career Services, The George Washington University

Details

This presentation covers the fundamentals of developing and implementing a division-wide assessment program in the Division of Student Affairs at the George Washington University, a larger, private, urban, research university. The presentation outlines the steps taken and explores considerations such as incorporating assessment into divisional goals, engaging senior leadership, and establishing a cross-divisional committee . The session engages participants in discussion and provides a toolkit to help them develop their own roadmaps for assessment programs at their institutions.

Rio Grande Center
Measurement of First Generation College Student Success: Acknowledging Diversity, Shared Experience, and Intersectionality

Margot Saltonstall, Director of Enrollment Management and Student Affairs Assessment, Northern Arizona University

Details

First-generation (FG) college students share some experiences but at the same time can be diverse in terms of academic preparation, family income, ethnicity, and psycho-social measures like commitment and motivation. For program directors and other professionals to gain a meaningful understanding of the learning, development, and academic progress of FG students, our assessment needs to account for this diversity and shared experience. Grounded in the first of NASPA’s Winter 2014 imperatives to “identify, actively recruit, and continually track first-generation students,” this session locates serving FG students in a national context, as well as addresses tailoring services regionally and acknowledging the range of FG student characteristics. We will use a case study of a campus initiative targeting FG students to examine how creating multi-layered comparison groups for assessment purposes yields more useful outcomes data reflective of the shared, diverse, and intersections of FG student characteristics and experiences.

Live Oak
Student Engagement and the Updated NSSE: Exploring Leadership, Learning Support, and Persistence Results

Jillian Kinzie, Associate Director, Center for Postsecondary Research, Indiana University

Details

The updated National Survey of Student Engagement (NSSE) provides colleges and universities new information about leadership, learning support and high-impact practices, and new module results offer insights into civic engagement and advising practices. This session will highlight new findings relevant to all campuses interested in student success. In addition, campuses with NSSE results will learn about approaches to analyzing results to understand engagement activities associated with persistence and consider ways to take action on results.

2:15 p.m. - 3:15 p.m.
Concurrent Sessions
Rio Grande East
Methods and Instrumentation for Assessing Development in Student Employees

Timothy Salazar, Data Analyst, Texas A&M University
Susan Fox-Forrester, Assessment Coordinator, Texas A&M University
Christina Athas, Research Analyst, The Ohio State University
D’Arcy Oaks, Associate Director for Assessment and Evaluation, The Ohio State University

Details

Co-curricular learning within institutions of higher education presents challenges for assessment. This presentation examines the different approaches of two large public institutions to addressing the learning of student employees within the co-curricular realm. Both approaches identified themes of student learning that have provided useful insight about how to increase student employment’s impact.

Nueces/Frio
Good to Great: Improving an Award-Winning Undergraduate Retention Program

Marcelo Vazquez, Associate Dean of Students, University of Nevada, Reno
Jennifer Lowman, Coordinator, Student Persistence Research, University of Nevada, Reno
Araceli Martinez, Assistant Director, The Center for Student Cultural Diversity, University of Nevada, Reno

Details

College Life 101 is an award winning retention and graduation program. However, until program specialists developed a learning outcomes assessment, it was not collecting data to demonstrate a direct impact on student persistence. Learning outcomes became the vehicle to improve content, structure, and delivery. Building a coordinated student services and academic affairs effort to document outcomes became the impetus to improve a good program by focusing on what information students need and when and transforming it into a great program.

Live Oak
Effective Summer Bridge Programs: Assessment, Action, & Results

Tamara Johnson, Executive Director of Multicultural Student Affairs, Northwestern University
Louie Lainez, Director, Asian/Asian American Student Affairs, Northwestern University

Details

This session will provide an overview of the summer bridge program offered at Northwestern University. Presenters will discuss the curricular and co-curricular components of the program, the formal assessment conducted, the annual action planning process to effectively incorporate student voices, and data related to the retention rates of program participants. Those interested in developing, modifying, or assessing a summer bridge program and using student feedback to implement changes, will find this presentation practical and useful.

Regency East
Better Together: Strategic Assessment Partnerships Between Academic and Student Affairs

Susan Platt, Director, Testing, Evaluation, & Assessment, Student Services, California State University, Long Beach
Sharlene Sayegh, Director, Program Review & Assessment Academic Affairs, California State University, Long Beach

Details

This session focuses on our strategic assessment partnerships between academic and student affairs professionals. We will explain how we collect, examine and use data collectively for student learning and development and program improvement. We’ll also describe how the work of our Program Review and Assessment Council has enabled us to inspire best assessment practices among faculty, staff and administrators throughout the campus community. Finally, we’ll discuss challenges we’ve faced and plans to continually strengthen our assessment methods and collaborations.

Rio Grande Center
Hitting the Bull's Eye of Missing the Mark: Ensuring the Effectiveness of First-Year Courses

Jordan Humphrey, Associate Director for Civic Engagement, Adjunct Instructor, St. Mary's University
Timothy Bessler, Dean of Students, St. Mary’s University

Details

Is your first-year course hitting the bull’s eye or is it missing the mark? How do you know? And, how do you ensure your program stays on target? This presentation demonstrates the importance of assessment and curricular redesign as relates specifically to first-year seminars and promises to provide examples that will help student affairs professionals understand how to develop a comprehensive evaluation and assessment plan that focuses on student success (personal and academic).

Chula Vista
College Mental Health and Academic Success: Findings from The Healthy Minds Study

Blake Wagner III, Creative Director/Research Associate, University of Michigan
Daniel Eisenberg, Associate Professor, Director, University of Michigan

Details

Mental health represents an important but relatively unexplored factor in explaining college student success. In our recent research, we have found that mental health problems, particularly depression and anxiety, are significant predictors of lower GPA and retention, even when controlling for prior academic achievement. In this program, we will present findings from our large-scale surveys to address how mental health affects student persistence and performance. We will facilitate discussion around next steps for improving policy and research in this area.

Blanco/Llano
Understanding the Impact of Social and Academic Integration on Multiracial Student Persistence

Ashley Spicer-Runnels, Leadership Institute Coordinator, Texas State University

Details

Multiracial individuals represented 2.9% of the U.S. population in 2010, which was a 32% increase in the multiracial population since 2000. Vincent Tinto’s theory of student integration stated that social and academic integration contributed to student persistence. This session will examine the impact of social and academic integration on multiracial student persistence, the importance of student service departments and programs, specifically for multiracial students, and why they have the power to influence student persistence.

Rio Grande West
Shaping Student Persistence: First Year Retention Strategies Using a Predictive Indicator Model

Jason Meriwether, Vice Chancellor for Enrollment Management & Student Affairs, Indiana University Southwest
Amanda Stonecipher, Assistant Vice Chancellor for Enrollment Management & Student Affairs, Indiana University Southeast

3:30 p.m. - 4:30 p.m.
Concurrent Sessions
Rio Grande West
The First Scholars Experience: A National Model for First-Generation Success

Wade Leuwerke, Associate Professor, Department Chair, Drake University
Tracie Lowe, Assistant Director, Campus Relations and Programming, The Suder Foundation

Details

First-generation students enrolling in higher education face significant difficulties during their acclimation to college that can negatively affect their persistence and ultimately success in college. First Scholars®, a four year program implemented at seven affiliate universities across the nation, is designed specifically to address the transitional needs of first-generation students. Join us for an engaging session to learn about and discuss strong persistence among First Scholars and the many program components that are supporting first generation college students.

Regency East
Exploring Academic Resiliency: Theory, Study, & Practice

Rebecca Murray, Client Services Manager, EBI MAP-Works

Details

Academic resiliency is promoted as having a significant impact on student motivation, behaviors, and hypothesized to have impact on outcomes. But how is known about academic resiliency? This session will discuss related theory, research, and practice as linked to first-year students. Specifically, the presenter will talk about the origins of self-efficacy, the relationship to academic resiliency and to students’ motivation, and the impact on behaviors and outcomes. Finally, this connection to practice will be made through examples and group discussion.

Rio Grande East
Enhancing Your Assessments Through the Use of Mixed Methods

S. Jeanne Horst, Assistant Professor and Assistant Assessment Specialist, James Madison University
Walter Ghant, Assistant Director of Community Service Learning, James Madison University
Devon Whetstone, Graduate Student, James Madison University

Details

Student affairs professionals increasingly assess and report student learning associated with their programs. Use of mixed methods is one way to maximize the information obtained through assessment. This session will provide activities that engage participants in exploring their own views of knowledge. Methods for combining quantitative and qualitative approaches will be presented. Applied examples will be offered in the context of James Madison University’s Community Service Learning program.

Nueces/Frio
All for One: Assessing a Single Student Learning Outcome Across a Division

Shannon Faris, Assistant Dean of Students for Research and Assessment, Loyola Marymount University

Details

As a means of streamlining assessment efforts and optimizing findings, the Division of Student Affairs at LMU assesses a single, common learning outcome each year. This effort includes both department-level as well as division-wide learning outcomes assessments. This presentation provides an overview of the process from introducing the concept and garnering organizational buy-in to closing the findings loop and using the outcomes to improve practice.

Live Oak
Program Review in Years 1-5: The Benefits of Using and "Incubation" Model to Assess Growth, Impact, and Scalability

Rudy Jackson, Director, Co-curricular Assessment, Georgia Gwinnett College

Details

Greater accountability in higher education has prompted institutions to build processes for program review that evaluate performance and provide data that informs decisions and practices. However, most program review processes evaluate new and mature programs similarly, without accounting for important differences that impact institutional decision-making. A specialized framework for program review that focuses on issues of growth, sustainability, and scalability for new programs in during years one through five is examined. Attendees will explore the application of this approach at their own institution.

Rio Grande Center
Exploring Provosts' Views of Campus-Wide Assessment: Generating Ideas for Student Affairs Educators Roles and Practice

Jillian Kinzie, Associate Director, Center for Postsecondary Research, Indiana University Bloomington

Details

Assessment must measure learning outcomes and program effectiveness campus-wide. Yet, the National Institute for Learning Outcomes Assessment (NILOA’s) 2013 provost survey indicates that while institutional uses of assessment evidence are up, there is limited support for student affairs involvement or need for more student affairs educators using results. This suggests a lack of integrated assessment activities and points to the need to explore the role of student affairs educators in campus-wide assessment. This session explores NILOA findings by involving the audience in interpreting results and generating strategies to foster campus partnerships for assessment.

Chula Vista
Building a Culture of Assessment: How to Use it to Mitigate Risk and Increase Persistence and Retention

Ghenet Weldeslassie, Interim Assistant Director of College Housing, Stony Brook University
Gina Vanacore, Associate Director of Residential Program, Stony Brook University

Details

In this program, we will discuss how at risk students persistence, retention, and graduation can be increased and progress be assessed. This will include defining and identifying at risk students, and designing strategies for interventions to increase academic and professional success. Stony Brook has an increased graduation rate of at risk students enrolled in programs designed to empower those students, enhance their academic and social success. We will make the connection to support the claim and ignite fellow professionals’ ideas.

Blanco/Llano
Sharing the Wealth: Developing a Platform for Successful Integration and Persistence for First-Generation/Low-Income Students

James Beattie, Assistant Director, Center for Student Engagement, University of Nevada, Reno
Sandra Rodriguez, Director, Center for Student Engagement, University of Nevada, Reno
Bill Thornton, Associate Professor, Educational Leadership, University of Nevada, Reno

Details

The Dean’s Future Scholars is a collaborative academic college based outreach program that recruits first generation/low income students in sixth grade and successfully transitions them into higher education. Specific components of student development include social/academic integration and reproduction of social and cultural capital (Astin & Sax, 1998; Bourdieu, 1983, 1988; Bloom, 2008). A case study produced data indicating program strategies facilitated college integration, engagement, and persistence. Of the cohort studied, 89% persisted into the second semester of their sophomore year.

Pecan
Don’t Want No Satisfaction: Assessing Learning in Student Affairs Programs with Rubrics

Jeremy Penn, Director, Student Affairs Assessment, North Dakota State University
Bunnie Johnson-Messelt, Director, Disability Services, North Dakota State University

Details

Assessing students’ satisfaction with student affairs programs is no longer sufficient as we are expected to assess student learning wherever it occurs. Targeting those who struggle to transition to assessing learning, we describe strategies for assessing learning and share the Office of Disability Services’ journey from no assessment, to assessing satisfaction with a survey, to assessing student learning with rubrics that are linked to division-wide learning outcomes. We discuss the benefits of rubrics and will share them with participants.

4:45 p.m. - 5:45 p.m.
Concurrent Sessions
Nueces/Frio
Assessment as the Generation of Actionable Knowledge

John Hathcoat, Assistant Professor/Assistant Assessment Specialist, James Madison University
Jerusha Gerstner, Graduate Assistant, James Madison University

Details

This session provides a philosophical and logical framework for improving student programs though assessment results. Aspects of this framework are applied to a substance abuse prevention program that uses motivational interviewing to facilitate change in target behaviors among college students. This application illustrates how to map objectives to program features and techniques for assessing both adherence and quality of program implementation. With such evidence in place, it is possible to identify specific aspects of the program that should be changed in order to improve student outcomes.

Rio Grande East
A Model of Assessment Coaching: Next Steps

D’Arcy Oaks, Associate Director, The Ohio State University
Sophie Tullier, Research Analyst, The Ohio State University

Details

A working model of assessment coaching is expanded to connect late, reporting/implementing steps to early, planning/designing steps to ensure utility and ethics of data gathering. Concrete examples of assessment plans, measuring instruments, and artifacts of reporting will be presented. Session participants will engage in dialogue and exercises to flesh out the model in the context of participants’ home institutions.

Regency East
Driving Effective Change through the Departmental Review Process

Gwen Fears, Associate Dean of Students, Miami University
Christina Carrubba-Whetstine, Interim Director, Rinella Learning Center, Miami University
Tim Kresse, Director of Student Affairs Budget and Technology, Miami University

Details

The division of Student Affairs at Miami University has developed a comprehensive departmental review process under which units conduct a thorough self-study examination and host an external visit. We will share our successes and pitfalls while highlighting key components that have been effective in providing a foundation for making data driven decisions informed through the departmental review process. We will address key elements of the review process and offer insight and thoughts for consideration while offering examples from our experiences.

Rio Grande Center
"Story of a Student:" Advancements of a Holistic Student Database

Amber Fallucca, Director of Assessment, University Housing, University of South Carolina
Rebecca Goldstein, Graduate Assistant for Assessment, University Housing, University of South Carolina
Sean Sukys, Graduate Assistant for Assessment, University Housing, University of South Carolina

Details

Utilizing technology-based approaches, presenters will describe qualitative and quantitative methods employed to assess the residential experience within a large research-intensive institution. Innovative approaches associated with creating a comprehensive database to combine assessment data across multiple systems will be discussed. Further emphasis will be placed on how findings can inform departmental outcomes and institutional performance benchmarks to provide a deeper understanding of the collegiate student experience.

Rio Grande West
Extended Orientation Program Persistence Rates: Texas A&M’s Ten-Year Longitudinal Assessment

Timothy Salazar, Data Analyst, Texas A&M University
Kelly Cox, Texas A&M University

Details

Extended orientation programs assist freshmen in their transition to college. We examine the question, if this transition training impact persistance of students from first to second semester and first to secnd year. Persistance rates of extended orientation program (Fish Camp) participants were compared to non-participants across student sub-groups. This session will provide an overview of Fish Camp, assessment methods, what was learned, how Fish Camp can use this information, and how this appraoches could be used at other institutions.

Chula Vista
Creating Your SPA! The Evolution of a Student Affairs Strategic Planning and Assessment Team

Amanda Drum, Executive Director of Strategic Engagement Initiatives, Texas A&M University-Corpus Christi

Details

This program is designed to assist assessment practitioners with the creation and development of a student affairs strategic planning and assessment team. Attendees will learn how one university met the immediate needs of accreditation preparation and how those efforts evolved into a comprehensive team approach to planning, assessment and continuous improvement. Methods of identifying and overcoming obstacles as well as methods of obtaining buy-in will be discussed and participants will be requested to share experiences and results.

Live Oak
Broadening Participation in Assessment Activities on Your Campus

Margot Saltonstall, Director of Enrollment Management and Student Affairs Assessment, Northern Arizona University
Jared Hopkins, Research Analyst, Northern Arizona University

Details

How involved in assessment are students, staff, and faculty on your campus? Come learn about how others are hosting assessment days, fairs, roundtables, and online discussions to bring people together to share results and ideas, build assessment capacity, and make our work more meaningful. The session will highlight successful events at a number of institutions as well as review pitfalls, challenges, and obstacles yet to overcome.

Day 3 Sat, Jun 21
7:00 a.m. - 10:30 a.m.
Conference Information
7:15 a.m. - 8:15 a.m.
Regency Foyer
Continental Breakfast
7:30 a.m - 8:15 a.m.
Rio Grande East
Assessment, Evaluation, and Research Knowledge Community Open Meeting
8:30 a.m. - 9:15 a.m.
Closing Plenary Session
Regency Ballroom
Morning Plenary: It Takes Courage to Succeed

Dr. Belle Wheelan, President of the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Commission on Colleges

Details

This session will provide an update on national conversations surrounding issues related to assessment of student learning, the completion agenda, competency based assessment, and other hot topics impacting institutions of higher education.

9:30 a.m. - 10:30 a.m.
Concurrent Sessions
Pecan
Graduation Rate of Low Income Students - In One Year

John Laws, Vice Chancellor for Student Affairs, Ivy Tech Community College
SeanMcCan, Accelerated Degree Program Coordinator, Ivy Tech Community College

Details

Low income and first generation students are recruited and provided the opportunity to earn an associate’s degree in one year. This accelerated paced program is designed for students who were not planning on college but are academically qualified. In its fourth year, the program has maintained an 80% success rate of students, combining the associate’s degree and leadership development. With a small investment, any institution can reproduce and achieve similar results. Ivy Tech is expanding the program due to success.

Rio Grande Center
Mixed Methods Assessment: The Odd Couple or a Match Made in Heaven?

Jeremy Penn, Director, Student Affairs Assessment, North Dakota State University

Details

Qualitative methods use words and themes, while quantitative methods use numbers and statistics. Although seemingly at odds, just like Oscar and Felix from The Odd Couple, there are advantages to mixing qualitative and quantitative methods in assessing student learning and development. This session will provide an overview of mixed methods assessment approaches and provide guidance on strategies for combining qualitative and quantitative methods in an assessment project.

Nueces/Frio
An Untapped Assessment Treasure: Using Focus Groups for Collecting Richer Data

Nathan Lindsay, Assistant Vice Provost for Assessment, University of Missouri-Kansas City
Darby Roberts, Director of Student Life Studies, Texas A&M University
Dan Stroud, Graduate Assistant for Assessment, University of Missouri-Kansas City

Details

For many decades, surveys have been the most popular method for collecting feedback from students. Many student affairs professionals are aware of and even use focus groups periodically, but most of them would benefit from using focus groups more regularly and more effectively. In this presentation, we will provide an overview of best practices for conducting focus groups, and then highlight examples of how focus groups have been used at three different universities.

Chula Vista
Creating Divisional and Departmental Level Learning Outcomes: One Institution’s Journey

Cindy Long Porter, Associate Vice President of Student Affairs, Quinnipiac University
Sean Kalagher, Associate Dean of Student Affairs, Quinnipiac University

Details

The demand for greater accountability of student learning in higher education has never been greater. Student learning outcomes are a vital tool in gauging institutional effectiveness, yet student affairs professionals still grapple with how to define the learning that takes place as a result of their programs and services. This session will illustrate the processes used at a mid-sized private university to categorize student learning and develop divisional and departmental level outcomes.

Rio Grande West
Invisible Population: Considering Ways to Help Formerly Incarcerated Students in Higher Education

Terrence McTier, Masters Student, University of Nebraska-Lincoln

Details

Formerly incarcerated students (FIS) are present on college campuses across the U.S. Issues of college access, lack of resources, and programming available for FIS, raises concerns for student affairs professionals. This presentation will dissect issues of college access and resources needed by FIS to thrive in a collegiate setting, sparking conversation for future research that will help college (higher education) administrators and staff effectively serve FIS as they transition from prison to the community and hopefully into higher education.

Regency East
Success and Persistence Factors for Transfer Students of Color

Julie Law, Graduate Student, Azusa Pacific University

Details

As enrollment into college is on the rise so is the number of students who are transferring into a 4 year institution (Laanan, 1996). However, for many students of color that is not the case (Laanan, 1996). Research has shown a growing trend towards student of color transferring from a community college to a 4 year institution and not being able to complete their degree on time or even at all (Berger & Malaney, 2003). This presentation will focus on what are the retention and persistence factors of students of color who have transferred to a 4 year University?

Rio Grande East
iPeer: Commuter & Transfer Communication/Engagement Plan

Carol Galladian, Associate Director, Georgetown University

Details

Attend this session and engage in conversations surrounding a new commuter and transfer peer-led communication plan-iPeer! iPeers are current student leaders who are assigned a group of incoming commuter/transfer students. iPeers maintain communication with their students during the fall semester and support them in exploring various engagement opportunities on campus! Join the discussion of how to work with diverse commuter and transfer students, methods of communication, and best practices in engaging this unique population.

Live Oak
Bringing Research and Policy into Assessment: an Organizational Philosophy

Anne McDaniel, Associate Director for Research and Data Management, The Ohio State University
Krystynse Savarese, Associate Director for Policy and Planning, The Ohio State University
D’Arcy Oaks, Associate Director for Assessment, and Evaluation, The Ohio State University

Details

A guiding philosophy, represented by a Venn diagram, has been adopted by a research and assessment office of a student affairs division. The philosophy encompasses three overlapping, interdependent, and complimentary areas: assessment and evaluation, research and data management, and planning and policy. We provide real-world examples of how these areas are simultaneously interdependent, overlapping, and complementary.

10:45 a.m. - 11:45 a.m.
Concurrent Sessions
Regency East
Creating a Culture of Evidence for Adult-Learners in Student Affairs

Adam Green, Senior Director of the Division of Student Success & P-20 Initiatives,West Virginia Higher Education Policy Commission
Katie Busby, Assistant Provost for Assessment and Institutional Research, Tulane University
Sarah Beasley, Director of Statewide Academic Initiatives, West Virginia Higher Education Policy Commmission

Details

This session will explore portions of two NASPA publications: (1) Building a culture of evidence in student affairs and (2) Increasing adult learner persistence and completion rates: A guide for student affairs leaders and practitioners. Much of the session will focus on the uniqueness of assessing student affairs adult learner-focused programs and services. The session and discussion will include concrete examples of how some institutions demonstrate the need for and the effectiveness of processes, programs, and services specifically designed for adult learners—and how they determine if programs and services designed for all students meet the needs of adult learners.

Rio Grande West
Holistic Assessment: From Research to Application

Ross Markle, Senior Research & Assessment Advisor - Higher Education Division, Educational Testing Service
Renée Delgado-Riley, Program Planning Officer, University of New Mexico

Details

The importance of “noncognitive” skills is well known by, and in fact often the focus of, most efforts in student affairs. However, only recently has assessment of these skills become more widely used, though less widely understood. In this session, we will review several keys to implementing holistic assessment to improve student persistence, each of which is both rooted in research and tied to practice. These include evaluating assessments, the use of scores, and applying assessments with populations of interest.

Rio Grande East
Living On-Campus and Student Learning: Steps to Developing a Housing Assessment Plan

Theresa Brown, Director of Student Affairs Research, University of Kansas
Chris Sowa, Assistant Director for Residence Life, University of Kansas
Jacque McKenna, Assistant Director for Residence Life in Student Housing, University of Kansas

Details

How does living on-campus contribute to academic success? Are on-campus students’ learning experiences different from off-campus students? These are the questions posed by housing professionals at the University of Kansas when they redesigned their assessment plan to intentionally focus on the university’s academic mission. Participants will learn how to reframe assessment questions to focus on student learning, select appropriate tools based on the current literature, and design a data analysis to capture how units contribute to the learning process.

Chula Vista
Student Affairs: Planting the Seed of Critical Thinking for FTIC Students

Barbara June Rodriguez, District Director, Quality Enhancement Plan, Broward College
Janice Stubbs, Dean, Student Affairs, Broward College

Details

At Broward College, student affairs is commonly referred to as the “early adapters,” and implementing the college’s QEP, Question Every Possibility—Think Critically, was no exception. Student affairs developed programming around the QEP’s conceptual framework of professional development and training, teaching and learning strategies, and outcomes-based assessment. This presentation discusses the FTIC orientation and advisement session; provides examples of teaching and learning strategies used; demonstrates how assessment is used for continuous improvement; and engages participants in hands-on activities.

Rio Grande Center
Reflections on Student Involvement: A comprehensive co-curricular approach

Kelly Cox, Assistant Director, Texas A&M University
Timothy Salazar, Data Analyst, Texas A&M University

Details

Measuring student learning in the co-curricular and how student involvement enhances the quality of a college education is challenging. The authors examined the value of co-curricular experiences through a reflection project that engaged students to reflected on campus involvement during the academic year. The study, involving 1,000+ students from approximately 85 organizations, focused on lifelong and integrative learning. This session will share project details, assessment methods, what was learned and discuss how this could be applied at other institutions.

Blanco/Llano
Generating Post-Hoc Comparison Groups for Persistence Research

Jennifer Lowman,Coordinator, Student Persistence Research, University of Nevada, Reno

Details

Persistence research is often limited by the lack of a comparison group for testing the effect of participation in a program or receipt of a particular service. Predicted values provide a post-hoc mechanism to generate a comparison group from basic enrollment data by matching non-participants to the program participants. We will discuss the benefits and limits of generating a post-hoc comparison group with predicted values or propensity scores to evaluate a program’s impact on various outcomes, specifically, persistence.

Nueces/Frio
Assessment and Accreditation: Making a Cogent Argument

Brandon Griggs, Dean of Student Affairs, Texas A&M University-Central Texas
Troy Courville, Assistant Vice President for Academic Enhancement and Institutional Effectiveness, Texas A&M University - Central Texas

Details

This presentation is designed to give student affairs and support programs tools to prepare writing a compliance report for accreditation and using diverse methods of measurement to assess programs and staff effectiveness. Through case studies and an overview of the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Commission on Colleges (SACSCOC) accreditation process and terminology, attendees will be prepared to return to their campuses to measure and write a cogent argument for compliance.

Live Oak
Developing Homegrown Assessments: Practical keys to success

Stan Dura, Director of Student Affairs Assessment and Research, University of Oregon

Details

Student affairs programs rely heavily on homegrown surveys for program evaluation, assessment of satisfaction, and more. Yet, few professionals in the field have any experience or training in sound survey design or understand how to get the most out of the data. This session will help provide professionals with a basic understanding of sound survey design and evaluation. Participants will discuss possible applications to individual contexts as well.

Pre-Conference Programs & Events

Assessment Revolution: A How-To Guide for Jumpstarting a Culture Change

Thursday, June 19th • 09.00 AM – 12.00 PM

Location: Rio Grande East

Presenter:
Nathan Lindsay, Assistant Vice Provost for Assessment, University of Missouri-Kansas City

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In response to accreditation standards, institutional mandates, and heightened student needs, many institutions are struggling to initiate best practices for assessment on their campus.  This pre-conference will feature the key elements needed for an assessment culture change, provide practice in the essential skill of writing good learning outcomes, and then highlight several data collection methods.  If you are seeking to develop a game plan for energizing or re-energizing your institution’s assessment initiatives, then this is the right session for you!

A Persistence Focused Student Concerns System: A Next Generation Behavioral Intervention Team

Thursday, June 19th • 09.00 AM – 12.00 PM

Location: Rio Grande West

Presenter:
Vince Diller, Assistant Dean of Students, Belmont University

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An innovative shift from a centralized “student at risk” intervention plan, to a University retention and persistence system highlighting high-touch, student centered advising and resourcing. This model’s architecture and philosophy provide a safe and efficient assessment of safety concerns and academic risk, then timely referral to the best relationship capable of assisting the student concern. This highly interactive workshop will review participating institutions’ and Belmont University’s experience in building retention and persistence programs and compare/contrast benefits of the presented model.

Registration

Registration as a member is based on individual membership status. If you are employed by a college or university that is an institutional member, you can join as an individual member at the $75 rate. This gives you the conference registration and a year of membership for less than the non-member registration fee.  If your institution is NOT a member, then you will need to join at the associate affiliate rate of $242 and then you can pay the individual member rate for conference registration.  Visit the Membership section of the NASPA website to learn about membership types.

Register Online

Registration Fees

Registration Type Early-Bird before 04/18/2014 Regular 04/19/2014 to 05/23/2014 Late after 05/23/2014
Full Registration
NASPA Member $410 $460 $535
Non-Member $610 $660 $735
NASPA Student Member $115 $170 $220
Pre-Conference Workshop $65 $85 $85

Questions?

Jennifer Vaseleck
Meeting Planner
Email: jvaseleck@naspa.org
Phone: (202) 719-1189

Policies

View Registration Policies

Group Registration:
NASPA offers discounts for attendees registering in groups of two or more individuals. To apply for this discount please contact NASPA at office@naspa.org. Please include in the email your name, the conference you're registering for, your institution name, and how many individuals you're registering. Our membership department will contact you once they've received this information.

Purchase Orders: 
Purchase orders will NOT be accepted for registration. There is now a Bill Me option online if you need to submit paperwork to your accounting office to have a check cut for your registration payment. Please use that option when registering online.

Cancellation Policy:
Refunds will be given for cancellations, received in writing by May 23, 2014, less a $50.00 processing fee. In addition, a processing fee of $50.00 per registration will be charged for credit cards declined.  We are unable to change payment methods after the initial payment is processed. With prior approval, anyone registered but who cannot attend may send a substitute. Substitution information must come in writing from the registered participant. The membership status of the substitute must be the same as the registrant in order to have the same registration fee applied. Additional charges may apply if the membership status is not the same. The conference may be cancelled or postponed due to unforeseen circumstances. In this case, registration fees will be refunded; however, NASPA will not be responsible for additional costs, charges, or expenses, including cancellation/change charges assessed by airlines, hotels, and/or travel agencies.  NASPA is not responsible for weather-related travel delays or other issues in regard to personal travel and no refunds will be given due to these occurrences.

NOTE: All requests for cancellation and refunds must be in writing to refund@naspa.org. Due to our food and beverage requirements, no refunds will be granted after May 23, 2014.  Registration Questions? Contact the NASPA office at 202-265-7500 or via e-mail at events@naspa.org.

Speakers


Alexander W. Astin, Ph.D.

Alexander W. Astin, Ph.D.

Allan M. Cartter Professor Emeritus of Higher Education , University of California, Los Angeles

Alexander W. Astin is Allan M. Cartter Distinguished Professor Emeritus of Higher Education and Founding Director of the Higher Education Research Institute at UCLA. He is also the Founding Director of the Cooperative Institutional Research Program and the author of 22 books and some 300 other publications in the field of higher education. The Journal of Higher Education in both 1990 and 2010 identified Dr. Astin as the author most frequently cited by others in the field of higher education.  Dr. Astin has been a recipient of 23 awards from 15 national associations, a fellow at the Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences, and a recipient of eleven honorary degrees, and is a member of the National Academy of Education. In 1985 readers of Change magazine selected him as the person "most admired for creative, insightful thinking" in higher education. His most recent books include Mindworks: Becoming More Conscious in an Unconscious World  (2007), Cultivating the Spirit: How Colleges Can Enhance Students’ Inner Lives (2011), and Assessment for Excellence: The Philosophy and Practice of Assessment and Evaluation in Higher Education: Second Edition (2012).

Luis Ponjuan, Ph.D.

Luis Ponjuan, Ph.D.

Associate Professor of Higher Education Administration, Texas A&M University

Dr. Luis Ponjuan is an Associate Professor of Higher Education Administration in the department of Educational Administration and Human Resource Development in the College of Education and Human Development at Texas A&M University, College Station, Texas. He has 20 years of professional higher education work experience by also working at the University of Florida, University of Michigan, and Florida State University. He earned his Ph.D. in Higher Education from the University of Michigan, Master’s degree from the Florida State University, and Bachelors degree in Psychology from the University of New Orleans.  He is a first generation Cuban immigrant and college graduate.

 

Over the years he has developed a comprehensive research agenda focused on access and equity in higher education for underrepresented students and faculty members of color. He has published in premier higher education academic journals (e.g. Research in Higher Education, Journal of Higher Education, Journal of Hispanic Higher Education, Thought and Action), higher education policy briefs for national education organizations (e.g. Institute for Higher Education Policy- IHEP). He has also presented at national educational research conferences (e.g. AERA, ASHE, NASPA, and AIR), The White House and the United States Congress, and The College Board, and the National Education Association.  He has earned over a half million dollars in research grant funding from organizations like TG Foundation, University of Florida’s Division of Sponsored Research, and the Howard Hughes Medical Institute.

 

Due to his research agenda and professional accomplishments, Dr. Ponjuan is the 2014-2015 College of Education and Human Development Aggies Commit to Transforming Lives Administrative Fellow, he was also awarded the 2012 NEA New Scholar Prize, the 2009 Faculty Fellow for the American Association of Hispanics in Higher Education, and a 2008 ASHE and Ford Foundation Fellow for the Institute on equity research methods and critical policy analysis. The SAGE publishing company also designated his co-authored article The Vanishing Latino Male in Higher Education as a SAGE 2010 most downloaded article.

Belle Wheelan, Ph.D.

Belle Wheelan, Ph.D.

President, Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Commission on Colleges

Dr. Wheelan currently serves as President of the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Commission on Colleges and is the first African American and the first woman to serve in this capacity.  Her career spans 40 years and includes the roles of faculty member, chief student services officer, campus provost, college president and Secretary of Education.  In several of those roles she was the first African American and/or woman to serve in those capacities.

 

Dr. Wheelan received her Bachelor’s degree from Trinity University in Texas  (1972) with a double major in Psychology and Sociology; her Master’s from Louisiana State University (1974) in Developmental Educational Psychology; and her Doctorate from the University of Texas at Austin (1984) in Educational Administration with a special concentration in community college leadership. 

 

She has received numerous awards and recognition including four honorary degrees; the Distinguished Graduate Award from Trinity University (2002), and from the College of Education at the University of Texas at Austin (1992); Washingtonian Magazine’s 100 Most Powerful Women in Washington, DC (2001); the AAUW Woman of Distinction Award (2002); the Suanne Davis Roueche National Institute for Staff and Organizational Development’s Distinguished Lecturer Award (2007); the John E. Roueche National Institute for Staff and Organizational Development’s International Leadership Award (2010); and the AACC Leadership Award (2011).

 

She holds and has held membership in numerous local, state and national organizations including Rotary International; Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Inc.; the American College Testing, Inc., Board of Directors; American Association of Community Colleges, Board of Directors; the Lumina Foundation for Education, Board of Directors; the President’s Round Table of the National Council on Black American Affairs; the National Black College Alumni Hall of Fame, Board of Directors; Excelencia in Education, Board of Directors; National Society of Collegiate Scholars, Community College Honorary Board; Next Generation Learning Challenges, Advisory Panel; Project GOALS (Gaining Online Accessible Learning Through Self-Study); and the National Student Clearinghouse, Board of Directors. 

Sponsors

Venue

All conference activities will take place at the Hyatt Regency San Antonio.


Hyatt Regency San Antonio
123 Losoya St.
San Antonio, TX 78205
(210) 222-1234
Website

With a spectacular location directly on the River Walk that overlooks the historic Alamo mission, Hyatt Regency San Antonio offers luxurious accommodations and a full range of modern services and amenities for your comfort and convenience. Step into our soaring 16-story atrium lobby and enjoy a warm welcome from Hyatt’s exceptional staff, setting the stage for an exceptional San Antonio experience. Surrounded a large variety of restaurants, bars, clubs, shops and tourist attractions, our excellent location raises us above all other San Antonio River Walk hotels.

The Hyatt Regency San Antonio has arranged special room rates for conference attendees, starting at $189/night (not including 16.75% local taxes).  Reservations must be made by Wednesday, May 28, 2014.  Please make your reservations as soon as possible, as hotel blocks tend to sell out for NASPA conferences!

Book Your Hotel Room Now!

PLEASE NOTE: The NASPA room block at the Hyatt Regency San Antonio is completely SOLD OUT. Below is a list of hotels that are within walking distance to the Hyatt Regency. NASPA will not be contracting a block of rooms at these hotels, so please contact the hotels directly for reservation rates and information. Please note that NASPA is not providing any transportation to and from the conference hotel to any other properties in the area. Availability at the conference hotel can change at any time. If you would like to try and reserve a room at the Hyatt Regency, please contact the hotel for any availability updates. Please keep in mind, when contacting the Hyatt Regency, the NASPA room rate may not be available.

The Emily Morgan Hotel - a DoubleTree by Hilton
(approximately 4 minute walk to Hyatt Regency)
705 East Houston Street
San Antonio, TX 78205
Tel: (210) 225-5100
http://www.emilymorganhotel.com/

Hotel Indigo Downtown - Alamo
(approximately 4 minute walk to Hyatt Regency)
105 N. Alamo
San Antonio, TX 78205
Tel: (877) 846-3446
http://www.ihg.com/hotelindigo/hotels/us/en/san-antonio/satin/hoteldetail

*Please Note: Please disregard the previous posting for the Hotel Idigo San Antonio - Riverwalk. Please contact the Hotel Idigo Downtown - Alamo listed above for reservation information.*

For hotel questions, please contact:
Jennifer Vaseleck
jvaseleck@naspa.org

  • Travel

    San Antonio is serviced by San Antonio International Airport (SAT). The Hyatt Regency is approximately 9 miles from the airport.

  • Transportation

    Shuttles
    For more information on airport shuttles, please visit the Shuttle page of the SAT website.

    Taxi
    For more information on taxi service, including fares and location information, please visit the Taxi page of the SAT website.

  • Weather

    Temperatures in San Antonio in June are around 90 degrees F during the day and in the low 70s at night. As the conference gets closer, please visit the Weather Channel website for the most up-to-date weather information.

Additional Info

We hope that you will explore San Antonio, when not busy with the institute or if you arrive in the city before the program begins. There are plenty of things to do and see if you are a first-time visitor or even if you have been to San Antonio many times. The official tourism website for San Antonio is one of many online resources available to visitors.

Parking
The Hyatt Regency San Antonio has been able to provide discounted self-parking of $18 per night (regular $25 per night) for all NASPA attendees.  Currently, overnight valet parking with in and out privledges is $35 per night. 

Attire
The dress for NASPA events is business casual.

Get in Touch with NASPA

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