2014 NASPA Civic Learning and Democratic Engagement Conference

June 12 – June 14, 2014
Miami, Florida

The 2014 NASPA Civic Learning and Democratic Engagement (CLDE) Conference is a professional development opportunity to educate participants about the civic learning initiatives championed by the field of student affairs.

Register Online

About

The 2014 NASPA Civic Learning and Democratic Engagement (CLDE) Conference is a professional development opportunity to educate participants about the civic learning initiatives championed by the field of student affairs. Designed for those new to civic engagement roles as well as seasoned scholars and practitioners, the NASPA CLDE conference offers a variety of dynamic learning opportunities to enhance civic engagement work by student affairs practitioners.

 Participants will gain insights from promising practices and current research to develop their professional competencies, develop a more comprehensive understanding of civic learning and democratic engagement, and acquire new skills and strategies to improve their professional practice.

 The NASPA CLDE conference is also supported by our Lead Initiative, a project recognizing a network of 73 postsecondary institutions for their commitment to civic learning and democratic engagement.

 Attend this conference to:

  • Engage in a learning community to share personal and professional experiences in educating students for lives of citizenship;

  • Acknowledge, recognize, and discuss the inherent tensions and challenges that lie with educating about democracy and engagement;

  • Expand your leadership ability to develop, sustain and grow civic engagement in their student affairs divisions, on their campuses, and in the field;

  • Learn tools and strategies to strengthen their ability to foster and deepen their campus’s engagement with their local, national, and global communities;

  • Network and connect with other student affairs professionals dedicated to civic education;

  • Be exposed to and integrate the latest research findings from the scholarly field studying civic learning and democratic engagement;

  • Gain opportunities for professional reflection and career development.

Institutional Team Attendance

NASPA encourages institutional team attendance at this event.  By having a multidisciplinary team, colleges and universities increase the probability of successfully implementing improved civic learning and democratic engagement programs when they get back to campus.  The best implementation of student learning and outcomes requires collaboration from both academic and student affairs to fully educate students for citizenship. The committee encourages campuses to send representatives from the following areas in order to allow for substantive conversations around how to create change on your campus:

  • Chief Student Affairs Officers
  • Student Affairs Educators
  • Provosts
  • Faculty Members
  • Academic Affairs Administrators
  • Educational Researchers
  • Institutional Researchers
  • Graduate Students
CONTINUING EDUCATION
Image of the NBCC logo and link to the NBCC homepage
National Board for Certified Counselors 

NASPA is an NBCC-Approved Continuing Education Provider (ACEP™) and may offer NBCC-approved clock hours for events that meet NBCC requirements. The ACEP™ solely is responsible for all aspects of the program. Forms and information will be provided at the conference.

 

Presented By


Audience

This event is most likely to influence these groups.

  • Chief Student Affairs Officer
  • AVP or “Number Two”
  • Faculty
  • Mid-Level
  • New Professional
  • Graduate
  • Senior Level

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Let others know you are coming!

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Call for Programs

The conference planning committee is seeking proposals that effectively link student affairs practice to the values of civic learning and democratic engagement.  Presenters will be asked to identify the intended audience for their session; beginner, intermediate and advanced. Additionally, the conference planning committee will select programs based upon the programs' relationship to the conference themes and learning outcomes.  

Conference Themes & Suggested Topics

  • Assessment of Civic Learning and Democratic Engagement

    Assessment is vitally important to the civic learning and democratic engagement movement; it provides valuable information about student learning and can inform decisions by institutional leaders.  Sessions in this theme will share successful assessment techniques, tools, and stories by experienced researchers and practitioners.

    • How does one write institutional, departmental and activity level learning outcomes related to CLDE?
    • What can be done to engage and train staff in quality assessment implementation?
    • How do you create and design institution-specific surveys?  What existing resources are available?
    • What are the different data techniques and methods used to measure learning outcomes related to CLDE?
    • What are the best and most effective ways to develop, collect, analyze and act upon evidence of student learning and persistence?

  • Developing Community Partnerships

    Developing strong, mutually-beneficial requires collaboration, communication, clear expectations and relationships.  Sessions in this theme will highlight campus-community partnerships and the ways in which partnerships can lead to improved outcomes for all.  

    • How are community partnerships developed, nurtured and maintained?  Is there a system in place to recognize these relationships and measure the impact on students, campus, and community?
    • How are community partners and voices involved with the institutional decision making, student learning outcomes and defining needs?  What are ways to ensure that  campus-community partnerships are not “mutually beneficial” in name only?
    • What challenges do institutions and community partners face in educating students for citizenship?

  • Engaging Diverse Students

    With the diversification of American higher education, CLDE offers opportunities to engage all students in their community and our democracy.  Colleges and universities must evaluate their campus outreach and programming to ensure that adult, part-time, minority, low-income, and commuter students have opportunities to participate in civic learning.  Topics in this theme may include: 

    • How are students, particularly diverse students, included in the civic life of their campus and community?  
    • For post-traditional populations, (commuter, first generation, adult, part-time, low-income students) how does your institutional programming intentionally provide civic learning and democratic engagement opportunities? 

  • Partnering with Academic Affairs

    Educating for civic learning and democratic engagement requires collaboration with community, faculty, student affairs educators, students, and staff. Partnerships between Academic Affairs and Student Affairs are requisite to integrate student learning, community experiences, and leadership. Topics in this theme may include:

    • How do student affairs educators and academic affairs colleagues partner and collaborate to support student learning?
    • What are best practices for academic and student affairs to take co-ownership in advancing students’ civic learning?  
    • What are the necessary components of an effective working relationship with academic affairs?

  • Promising Practices in Civic Learning and Democratic Engagement

    The promising practices theme is intended to be an opportunity for those engaged in quality civic learning and democratic initiative to share their successes.  These promising practices may occur at the program, department, or divisional level.  Sessions should provide some instruction so that participants may be able to adapt what they learn to their own assessment processes.  Topics may include:

    • What processes are in place to implement capacity building, professional development and training across the division of student affairs to promote civic learning and democratic engagement?
    • How is the culture and language of civic learning and democratic engagement an integrated part of the division of student affairs?
    • How does civic learning and democratic engagement programming connect and relate to other student affairs divisional efforts?



Submission Timeline
  • November 13, 2013
    Call for Programs Opens
  • January 17, 2014
    Call for Program Reviewers Closes
  • February 10, 2014
    Call for Programs Closes
  • March 10, 2014
    Program Notifications Sent
  • March 17, 2014
    Program Confirmation Required
  • March 28, 2014
    Schedule Posted Online

Writing Tips

Looking for tips on writing an effective NASPA proposal? See sample submissions and formatting tips in our Program Submission Guidelines.

Questions?

Please contact NASPA if you have any further questions about submitting a program proposal for the 2014 NASPA Civic Learning and Democratic Engagement Conference.

Lindsey Hammond
Assistant Director of Educational Programs
Phone: (202) 719-1180
Email: lhammond@naspa.org

Schedule

Click here to download a PDF version of the schedule. PLEASE NOTE: This schedule is updated as of 5/30/2014 and is subject to change. 

Thu, Jun 12

7:30 a.m. – 5:00 p.m.
Conference Registration
9:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m.
Pre-conference Workshops
Bridging the Gap to Develop a Civic-Minded Institution: An Institutional Self-Assessment Model
Details
Engaging Academic Affairs in Aligning Civic Learning Across the Institution
Details
1:30 p.m. – 1:45 p.m.
Conference Opening and Welcome
1:45 p.m. – 2:30 p.m.
Opening Plenary Session: Now What? Shaping the Future of Civic Learning and Democratic Engagement in Higher Education
Barbara Jacoby, Ph.D., Faculty Associate, Leadership and Community Service-Learning, University of Maryland
Details
2:45 p.m. – 3:45 p.m.
General Interest Sessions
Assessing Community Service Events for Evidence of Student Development of Civic-Mindedness
Details
Connecting students beyond the campus: Regional collaborations for Social Change
Details
Seeing U.S. Through Their Eyes
Details
Students Learning and Leading in the Center for Civic Engagement
Details
The CUNY Service Corps: Utilizing Experiential Learning Strategies to Create Program Culture
Details
Walk Before You Run: A Beginner's Guide to Establishing Civic Engagement on Your Campus
Details
4:00 p.m. – 5:00 p.m.
General Interest Sessions
Certificate in Civic Engagement and Global Citizenship - A Collaborative Affair
Details
Creating a Plan to Assess Student Leadership and Development
Details
Engaging Student in Politics: Building a Skill Set for Democratic Participation
Details
No Center, No Course, No Problem!
Details
Reimaging Food and Reimaging Relationships: Building a Framework for Integrating Student Learning
Details
The Continuum of Learning and Critical Reflection: Serve, Connect, Learn
Details
5:15 p.m. – 6:30 p.m.
Community Partner Panel
Details
6:30 p.m. – 7:30 p.m.
Reception with Poster Sessions
Creating and Running a Community Partner Mini-Grant
Details
Cross-Cultural Involvement: Review of International Student Community Engagement in Higher Education
Details
Displays of Civic Mindedness: An Assessment of Democracy Plaza
Details
Faculty perspectives on service learning: A ten-year qualitative study
Details
Student Affairs & Academic Affairs Collaboration Through Service-Learning Faculty Fellows
Details

Fri, Jun 13

7:15 a.m. – 5:00 p.m.
Conference Registration
7:15 a.m. – 8:15 a.m.
Continental Breakfast
7:15 a.m. – 8:15 a.m.
Lead Institution Breakfast
Details
8:15 a.m. – 9:15 a.m.
Morning Plenary Session: Creating Campus Climates that Support Civic Learning and Democratic Engagement
Robert Reason, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Student Affairs and Higher Education, Iowa State University
Details
9:30 a.m. – 11:30 a.m.
Mini-Institutes
Powerful Pathways in Creating Change: The Intersection of Social Entrepreneurship and Community Engagement
Details
Democratic Dialogue for Civic Learning in Co-Curricular Activities
Details
Promising Practices for Engaging Students in Politics
Details
More than counting hours: Assessing meaningful civic outcomes
Details
Using TurboVote to Institutionalize Voter Engagement On Your Campus
Details
Civics, Citizenship, and Saving the Democracy
Details
11:30 a.m. – 1:00 p.m.
Conference Break (Lunch on Own)
1:00 p.m. – 2:00 p.m.
General Interest Sessions
"But knowing and being there are different things:" An Examination of Service-Learning
Details
HOT TOPICS: Student-to-Student Cultural Dialogues
Details
Infusing Civic Learning into Career Services’ Programs, Assessment and Operations.
Details
Moving Beyond the "Like" button- New Ways to Engage in Social Change
Details
Sustaining Partnerships in Sustainable Development: The St. Thomas University/Port-de-Paix, Haiti, Global Solidarity Project
Details
What are students learning and how do we help?: Four themes for practitioner reflection.
Details
2:15 p.m. – 3:15 p.m.
General Interest Sessions
Assessing Campus Climate: The Personal and Social Responsibility Inventory
Details
Measuring Student Community Engagement - The National Assessment of Service and Community Engagement
Details
Election 2014: How to Help Your Students Register and Vote
Details
Staying on the Same Page: Incorporating a Tiered Model for Transparent Partnerships
Details
The impact of a mandatory service component at two Mexican Higher Education Institutions
Details
The Impact of Immersion: Academic/Student Affairs Partnerships to Advance Civic Learning
Details
3:30 p.m. – 4:30 p.m.
General Interest Sessions
Two Models for Promoting Civil Dialogue Around Democratic Issues
Details
Developing Political Engagement Through Connecting Course Objectives to Current Events
Details
Strategic Civic Engagement Opportunities with TurboVote
Details
From Volunteering to Active Citizenship: Transforming a Campus Climate
Details
Spring Cleaning: Dusting Away the Cobwebs of Volunteer Services to Make Room for Better Citizens
Details
UM Civic Scholars Program: An Innovative Student Affairs and Academic Affairs Partnership
Details
4:45 p.m. – 5:45 p.m.
General Interest Sessions
CLEWS for Building Community Leaders: Can Civic Participation Increase Retention?
Details
Controversy and Civility within Campus Demonstrations: Creating a Culture of Democratic Engagement
Details
Giving Civic Engagement a “Beach Front” Location
Details
Head, Heart, Hand: Global Civic Engagement at an Access Institution
Details
Reinvent Reflection through Digital Storytelling: The Pedagogical Strategy and How-To
Details
Student Poll Worker Programs: Giving Students Hands-On Experience With Democracy
Details
6:00 p.m. – 7:30 p.m.
Reception - Sponsored by Florida Campus Compact and Miami Dade College
Details

Sat, Jun 14

7:15 a.m. – 10:00 a.m.
Registration/Information Desk
7:15 a.m. – 8:15 a.m.
Continental Breakfast
7:15 a.m. – 8:15 a.m.
Small Colleges and Universities Roundtable
Details
8:15 a.m. – 9:15 a.m.
Closing Plenary Session: What You Need to Know and Do to be an Effective Citizen
Senator Bob Graham, Former Florida Governor and Florida Senator
Details
9:30 a.m. – 10:30 a.m.
General Interest Sessions
From Civic Volunteerism to Political Engagement at Saint Louis University
Details
Infusing Civic Engagement In Your Student Staff Training
Details
Short-Term Immersion Programs: An Assessment of Holistically Engaged Learning
Details
Tapping Into Adult Students’ Dormant Desire to Integrate, Participate and Become Engaged
Details
What You Do Matters: A Chicago Partnership Inspires Students to Become Agents for Positive Change
Details
10:45 a.m. – 11:45 a.m.
General Interest Sessions
Developing a Co-curricular and Curricular Civic Engagement Partnership: A Case Study
Details
Developing Students in Sustained Partnerships: A Pathway to Capacity Building Placements
Details
Growing Leadership in STEM: Producing Great Scientists and Citizens
Details
Moving Beyond Traditional Community Service: An Academic Framework for Community Based Learning
Details
The Co-Curricular Transcript - You Complete Me. Documenting the Total Student Experience
Details
Using Reflective Practice to Assess Student Learning Outcomes for Civic Learning and Democratic Engagement
Details

Pre-Conference Programs & Events

All Pre-Conference Workshops will occur on Thursday, June 12, 2014 from 9:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. and are an additional fee. 

Bridging the Gap to Develop a Civic-Minded Institution: An Institutional Self-Assessment Model

Thursday, June 12th • 09.00 AM – 12.00 PM

Location: Picasso

Presenters:
J.R. Jamison, Associate Director - Indiana Campus Compact
Maggie Stevens, Executive Director - Indiana Campus Compact

View More Details

The value of civic-mindedness is growing on college campuses, but are we prepared for the shifts needed with the institutional structure? Indiana Campus Compact will take you on a journey of exploring an institutional planning rubric that brings together Academic/Student Affairs to guide institutional work in and with communities. Aggregate data from over 20 campuses that completed the rubric will be shared, and participants will test the rubric and learn how to lead the process on their campuses.

Engaging Academic Affairs in Aligning Civic Learning Across the Institution

Thursday, June 12th • 09.00 AM – 12.00 PM

Location: Tenor

Presenters:
Char Gray, Executive Director - PA Campus Compact
Debby Scire, Executive Director - Campus Compact of New Hampshire

View More Details

In order for institutions to embrace the renewed call to civic learning and truly embed it in their culture and practices (see A Crucible Moment), it must be inculcated across the institution. While today academic service learning and co-curricular service experiences abound at institutions, civic learning is the key to building an active citizenry committed to the public good. “Civic learning….any learning that contributes to student preparation for community or public involvement in a diverse democratic society…explicitly direct and purposeful (MJCSL Workbook, p.38).”Through this institute, leaders from both student and academic affairs will have an opportunity to: Create shared understanding of institutional cultures across divisions; Gain insight into current trends shaping civic and community engagement such as civic learning; Identify opportunities to leverage partnerships across the institution to align civic learning; Create common understanding of language associated with community engagement and civic learning; Develop an action plan for implementation. This institute is designed for institutional teams of at least one representative from each division i.e. student affairs, academic affairs.

Registration

Online registration will close at 11:59 p.m. on Thursday, June 5, 2014. On-site registration will be available in Miami during regular registration hours. 

Registration as a member is based on individual membership status. If you are employed by a college or university that is an institutional member, you can join as an individual member at the $75 rate. This gives you the conference registration and a year of membership for less than the non-member registration fee.  If your institution is NOT a member, then you will need to join at the associate affiliate rate of $242 and then you can pay the individual member rate for conference registration.  Visit the Membership section of the NASPA website to learn about membership types.

Register Online

Registration Fees

Registration Type Early-Bird before 04/11/2014 Regular 04/12/2014 to 05/09/2014 Late after 05/10/2014
Full Registration
NASPA Member $410 $460 $535
Non-Member $610 $660 $735
NASPA Student Member $115 $170 $220
Pre-Conference Workshop $65 $85 $85

Questions?

Jennifer Vaseleck
Meeting Planner
Email: jvaseleck@naspa.org
Phone: (202) 719-1189

Policies

View Registration Policies

Group Registration:
NASPA offers discounts for attendees registering in groups of two or more individuals. To apply for this discount please contact NASPA at office@naspa.org. Please include in the email your name, the conference you're registering for, your institution name, and how many individuals you're registering. Our membership department will contact you once they've received this information.

Purchase Orders: 
Purchase orders will NOT be accepted for registration. There is now a Bill Me option online if you need to submit paperwork to your accounting office to have a check cut for your registration payment. Please use that option when registering online.

Cancellation Policy:
Refunds will be given for cancellations, received in writing by May 16, 2014, less a $50.00 processing fee. In addition, a processing fee of $50.00 per registration will be charged for credit cards declined.  We are unable to change payment methods after the initial payment is processed. With prior approval, anyone registered but who cannot attend may send a substitute. Substitution information must come in writing from the registered participant. The membership status of the substitute must be the same as the registrant in order to have the same registration fee applied. Additional charges may apply if the membership status is not the same. The conference may be cancelled or postponed due to unforeseen circumstances. In this case, registration fees will be refunded; however, NASPA will not be responsible for additional costs, charges, or expenses, including cancellation/change charges assessed by airlines, hotels, and/or travel agencies.  NASPA is not responsible for weather-related travel delays or other issues in regard to personal travel and no refunds will be given due to these occurrences.

NOTE: All requests for cancellation and refunds must be in writing to refund@naspa.org. Due to our food and beverage requirements, no refunds will be granted after May 16, 2014.  Registration Questions? Contact the NASPA office at 202-265-7500 or via e-mail at events@naspa.org.

Speakers


  • Senator Bob Graham

    Senator Bob Graham

    Former Florida Governor and Florida Senator and Chair
    Bob Graham Center for Public Service at the University of Florida

    Speaker Bio

  • Barbara Jacoby, Ph.D.

    Barbara Jacoby, Ph.D.

    Faculty Associate for Leadership and Community Service-Learning at the Adele H. Stamp Student Union – Center for Campus Life
    University of Maryland, College Park

    Speaker Bio

  • Robert Reason, Ph.D.

    Robert Reason, Ph.D.

    Associate Professor of Student Affairs and Higher Education
    Iowa State University

    Speaker Bio

Venue


Hilton Miami Downtown
Miami, FL

All conference activities will take place at the Hilton Miami Downtown

  • Travel

    Miami is serviced by Miami International Airport (MIA). The Hilton Miami is approximately 15 minutes from the airport.

  • Transportation

    Shuttles & Taxi Cabs

    For more information on shuttle and taxi cab services, please visit the Ground Transportation page of the MIA website.

    Car Rentals

    For information regarding car rentals, including available companies and contact information, please visit the Car Rental section of the MIA website.

  • Weather

    Temperatures in Miami in June are approximately 85 degrees F during the day. Please visit the Weather Channel before you travel for the most up to date information regarding weather.

Additional Info

We hope that you will explore Miami, when not busy with the conference or if you arrive in the city before the program begins. There are plenty of things to do and see if you are a first-time visitor or even if you have been to Miami many times. The official tourism website for Miami is one of many online resources available to visitors.

Attire
The dress for NASPA events is business casual.

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Bridging the Gap to Develop a Civic-Minded Institution: An Institutional Self-Assessment Model

J.R. Jamison, Associate Director - Indiana Campus Compact
Maggie Stevens, Executive Director - Indiana Campus Compact

The value of civic-mindedness is growing on college campuses, but are we prepared for the shifts needed with the institutional structure? Indiana Campus Compact will take you on a journey of exploring an institutional planning rubric that brings together Academic/Student Affairs to guide institutional work in and with communities. Aggregate data from over 20 campuses that completed the rubric will be shared, and participants will test the rubric and learn how to lead the process on their campuses.

×

Engaging Academic Affairs in Aligning Civic Learning Across the Institution

Char Gray, Executive Director - PA Campus Compact
Debby Scire, Executive Director - Campus Compact of New Hampshire

In order for institutions to embrace the renewed call to civic learning and truly embed it in their culture and practices (see A Crucible Moment), it must be inculcated across the institution. While today academic service learning and co-curricular service experiences abound at institutions, civic learning is the key to building an active citizenry committed to the public good. “Civic learning….any learning that contributes to student preparation for community or public involvement in a diverse democratic society…explicitly direct and purposeful (MJCSL Workbook, p.38).”Through this institute, leaders from both student and academic affairs will have an opportunity to: Create shared understanding of institutional cultures across divisions; Gain insight into current trends shaping civic and community engagement such as civic learning; Identify opportunities to leverage partnerships across the institution to align civic learning; Create common understanding of language associated with community engagement and civic learning; Develop an action plan for implementation. This institute is designed for institutional teams of at least one representative from each division i.e. student affairs, academic affairs.

×

Opening Plenary Session: Now What? Shaping the Future of Civic Learning and Democratic Engagement in Higher Education

Barbara Jacoby, Ph.D., Faculty Associate, Leadership and Community Service-Learning, University of Maryland

Many of us who have engaged students in service-learning reflection are familiar with the prompt: “What (have we done and learned?) So what (does it mean)? Now what (do we do?).” These questions also serve us well as we reflect on the work in civic learning and democratic engagement that we have begun on many of our campuses, the results we have seen, and how we can institutionalize civic engagement on our campuses and shape the movement across the landscape of higher education. Please join us as we look beyond our daily work to contemplate the possibilities, challenges, and complexities of civic learning and democratic engagement. We will examine what’s next for student affairs professionals in the way of scholarship and practice as we prepare our students to be civically engaged citizens, scholars, and leaders in local and global communities.

×

Assessing Community Service Events for Evidence of Student Development of Civic-Mindedness

Kristin Norris, Director of Assessment, Center for Service & Learning - IUPUI
Jen Halford, Program Director for Community Service & Civic Engagement at the IUPUI Center for Service & Learning and the Office of Student Involvement - IUPUI

Educating for democracy. Graduating responsible citizens. Teaching the public purposes of our disciplines. All of these are related to civic learning and democratic engagement, but how do we accomplish this? This session will share best practices, assessment tools, and survey findings from 3 campus-wide service events (N=>800), which provides insights into how students develop civic-mindedness. Participants should be prepared to discuss how institutions can assess and provide evidence of civic learning and democratic engagement on their campus.

×

Connecting students beyond the campus: Regional collaborations for Social Change

Marianne Magjuka, Director of Campus Life - Wake Forest University
Andrew Wiemer, Director of the William R. Butler Center for Volunteer Service and Leadership Development - University of Miami

The Atlantic Coast Conference sponsors an annual symposium that aims to develop a community of undergraduate students who understand the relationship between global and local issues and work to create innovative initiatives for social change. This session will provide an overview of the symposium, regional collaborations, and the ways in which the experience fosters a sense of individual and collective social responsibility. We will share resources for extending student learning beyond the symposium. Attendees will identify ways in which they can create similar programs within their institutional and regional contexts.

×

Seeing U.S. Through Their Eyes

Linda Major, Assistant to the Vice Chancellor, Student Affairs and Director, Center for Civic Engagement - University of Nebraska-Lincoln
Nancy Mitchell, Director, Undergraduate Education - University of Nebraska-Lincoln
Kris Baack, Director, Leadership Development - University of Nebraska-Lincoln
Linda Moody, Director, Service Learning - University of Nebraska-Lincoln

The purpose of this presentation is to share lessons learned from a University of Nebraska-Lincoln (UNL) sponsored institute on civic engagement involving 20 foreign students representing four southern African countries. The UNL Institute on Civic Engagement, supported by the U.S. State Department, provided a multifaceted environment for visiting students to learn about American government, history, and society while equipping them with the leadership and management skills necessary to become engaged citizens and leaders in their own communities.

×

Students Learning and Leading in the Center for Civic Engagement

Christie Zwahlen, Assistant Director, Center for Civic Engagement - Binghamton University
Allison Alden, Director, Center for Civic Engagement - Binghamton University

This presentation will focus on the democratic processes used to administer Binghamton University’s Center for Civic Engagement, where students, professional staff and community members are regarded as equally important contributors to the educational and administrative processes. Discussions topics will include the strategies, challenges and intricacies involved in the recruitment, hiring, training and supervision of student staff who help run the Center’s most important events and programs, insights gained along the way and tangible tips to implement a similar program at other institutions. Examples of excellent student-led events and programs will be shared as well as the specific processes used to facilitate personal and professional growth within the office.

×

The CUNY Service Corps: Utilizing Experiential Learning Strategies to Create Program Culture

Rachel Stephenson, University Director, CUNY Service Corps - The City University of New York
Valerie Chow, Associate Director - The City University of New York
Ofronama Biu, Partnership Development & Engagement Specialist - The City University of New York
Melissa Fernandez, Student Outreach & Support Specialist - The City University of New York

With only 9 months to plan and launch the CUNY Service Corps at the City University of New York in 2013, CUNY prioritized the utilization of experiential learning strategies in key program areas such as student selection, training, and support as well as service placement supervision in order to create an authentic program culture of civic engagement, professional identity, and ongoing reflection. Join this workshop to explore these concrete strategies and experience effective community-building activities.

×

Walk Before You Run: A Beginner's Guide to Establishing Civic Engagement on Your Campus

Morgan Lewing, Director of Civic & Student Engagement - Texas A&M University-Central Texas
Brandon Griggs, Dean of Students - Texas A&M University-Central Texas

Civic Engagement and Democratic Learning have the ability to drastically change any campus. However, the initial development and the question of “Where do I start?” can be very daunting. This interactive session will help participants that are new to arena of civic engagement develop their own philosophical approach by identifying best practices and practical application of current literature. Furthermore, presenters will intentionally focus on the identification of possible civic engagement mechanisms that can help integrate student and academic affairs priorities.

×

Certificate in Civic Engagement and Global Citizenship - A Collaborative Affair

Brenda Whiteside, Associate Vice-President, Student Affairs - University of Guelph
Laurie Schnarr, Director, Student Life - University of Guelph

The University of Guelph has a long history of engagement with communities in addressing issues of local and global importance. However, traditionally, the academics focused on curriculum and student affairs staff focused on co-curricular activities. This session will discuss how Student Affairs and Academic staff collaboratively designed an integrated certificate program in Civic Engagement and Global Citizenship and both the design and implementation challenges arising from a collaborative program that involves a team of both academics and student affairs professionals.

×

Creating a Plan to Assess Student Leadership and Development

Jennifer Eustaquio, Program Director - Stanford University

Assessing student development and learning in CLDE is essential in ensuring high quality programming; supporting student strategies and reflection; and supporting students’ developing professionalism. This presentation focuses on the importance of clear goals and expectations and the utilization of different data collection methods for more well-rounded assessments. We will also define types of assessments, find a purpose to assess, and study an example assessment plan.

×

Engaging Student in Politics: Building a Skill Set for Democratic Participation

Kevin Tucker, University Director Student Life - City University of New York
Anthony Maniscalco, Director Edward T. Rogowsky Internship Program - City University of New York
Kisha Fuentes, Coordinator, Malave Leadership Academy - City University of New York

This session will discuss two CUNY programs that develop students’ leadership skills through experiential activities within the public policy sector. One program provides leadership development experiences within legislative institutions; the other focuses on how to advocate to government stakeholders. One program is strictly co-curricular; the other has academic credit options. Attendees will be involved in a discussion of the program components: how they can be improved and how they may want to implement similar initiatives on their campuses.

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No Center, No Course, No Problem!

Stephanie Reynolds, Coordinator of Student Affairs - Chatham University
Zauyah Waite Ph.D., Vice President of Student Affairs and Dean of Students - Chatham University

As a small private liberal arts, single gender institution, Chatham University promotes Civic Learning and Democratic Engagement without the centralized benefit of a center for civic engagement or a curricular service learning requirement. Student Affairs staff at Chatham have made a creative and strategic effort to enhance our students’ understanding and implementation of Civic Learning and Democratic Engagement by complementing academic course work with a program known as the Emerging Leaders Institute. This session will generate discussion about launching, implementing and assessing a campus-wide initiative.

×

Reimaging Food and Reimaging Relationships: Building a Framework for Integrating Student Learning

Kris Pierre, Senior Director for Academic & Community Partnerships - Northeastern Illinois University
Barbara Cosentino, Associate Director – Student Leadership Development - Northeastern Illinois University
Maria Genao-Homs, Director Latino/a Resource Center - Northeastern Illinois University
Frank Ross, Vice President for Student Affairs - Northeastern Illinois University

This session will examine how faculty and staff in an academic college and a student affairs division at a diverse urban institution have worked to link student learning to the importance of civic engagement. Presenters will share how a common theme focused on a critical public issue provided a framework to connect learning across organizational boundaries and into the community. We will also examine the rewards and challenges involved in such partnerships and share the lessons learned from our experiences.

×

The Continuum of Learning and Critical Reflection: Serve, Connect, Learn

Char Gray, Executive Director - PA Campus Compact

“The function of education is to teach one to think intensively and to think critically-intelligence plus character—that’s the goal of education.” Martin Luther King, Jr. Drawing on several learning theories, this session will assist practitioners to map out how learning is activated by critical reflection through various forms of service along the continuum of service, from curricular to co-curricular. Practitioners will examine case studies which illustrate different types of service experiences, from exploratory to generative. Additionally, they will have hands-on guidance in designing developmentally appropriate critical reflection to enhance learning and support students in identifying, exploring, prioritizing, and reframing their experiences.

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Community Partner Panel

Three local community partners will share their partnership experience with The University of Miami, Florida International University, and St. Thomas University. The topics covered by the panel will broadly include themes around relationships between campus and community; mutually beneficial partnerships, assessment, and the shared role of educating students to be citizens and participate in our democracy. The panel will begin with brief introductions from the partners and their partnering institions and then allow for questions.

HandsOn Miami inspires, equips and mobilizes people to take action to positively effect change in Miami-Dade County. We believe in the potential that we all have to “Be the Change”, and we create meaningful and inclusive opportunities that ensure everyone can contribute regardless of age, ability or availability. We coordinate and manage more than 18 high impact volunteer opportunities that put people at the center of change in our local communities every month.

The Coalition of Immokalee Workers (CIW) is a community-based farmworker organization struggling to end poverty, exploitation, and modern-day slavery in the fields. Over the past two decades, CIW has led the nationwide Campaign for Fair Food, reaching agreements for improved wages and working conditions with twelve of the largest corporate retailers on the planet, including Taco Bell, McDonalds, and Walmart. Today, the CIW's Fair Food Program is transforming Florida's agriculture industry and helping to ensure dignity and respect for tens of thousands of farmworkers.

Branches has made a positive impact in the community for over 40 years by delivering on its mission to serve, educate and inspire people through student, family and financial stability services. Branches provides long-term, holistic services for motivated individuals and families through after-school, youth development and financial stability services. Branches helps people grow deeper and climb higher in life by building a foundation through education so they can achieve their goals and fulfill their potential.

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Creating and Running a Community Partner Mini-Grant

Will Harrison, Program Assistant - Drexel University's Lindy Center for Civic Engagement

Currently in its third year, the Lindy Center for Civic Engagement’s Community Partner Grant provides funds to support innovative ideas that address community issues and promote collaboration between non-profit partners and Drexel students, faculty, and administration. This presentation will explore how universities may develop and enact a community mini-grant, as well how to evaluate partner proposals. Attendees will also learn about the impact that small grants can have on the local community.

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Cross-Cultural Involvement: Review of International Student Community Engagement in Higher Education

Xi Yu, Research Assistant - University of Minnesota-Twin Cities

This study explores community engagement and service learning among international students in the US. The poster presents findings from an integrative review on the facts of international student’s community engagement, based on an exploration of data results from Student Experience in the Research University (SERU) and international student services. It also provides practical recommendations for student affairs professionals to encourage international students to be involved in community engagement for student development as well as involving domestic students across whole campus.

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Displays of Civic Mindedness: An Assessment of Democracy Plaza

Anne Weiss, Service Learning Scholar, PhD Student - IUPUI

The debate regarding the civic mission of higher education institutions has generated a strong focus on quantifying the outcomes of student affairs practices which support this mission. Yet no previous study has undertaken an analysis of how engagement in intentional spaces on a college campus support students’ civic mindedness. This study looks at the public, communicative actions appearing at Democracy Plaza (IUPUI) in order to form a foundation for understanding the process and performance of civic mindedness.

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Faculty perspectives on service learning: A ten-year qualitative study

Jay Cooper, Associate Professor of Education - Grand Valley State University

This poster session reports on qualitative data collected on faculty following ten years of engagement in service learning. Themes addressed include why faculty become involved in service learning, impact on promotion and tenure, challenge and rewards of engaging in the pedagogy, and what sustained them in their work. The role of service learning in civic learning and democratic education will also be addressed.

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Student Affairs & Academic Affairs Collaboration Through Service-Learning Faculty Fellows

Dennis McCunney, Director, Volunteer and Service-Learning Center - East Carolina University

Community engagement is a core component of East Carolina University’s mission. Research shows that high quality service-learning can deepen student learning and enhance relationships with the local community. Historically, ECU has offered limited, personalized educational opportunities for faculty interested in enhancing their knowledge of service-learning pedagogy. As such, a Faculty Fellows program was developed to introduce faculty to service-learning. This poster session will present survey results about program effectiveness and suggested action items relative to academic and student affairs collaboration.

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Lead Institution Breakfast

By invitation only.

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Morning Plenary Session: Creating Campus Climates that Support Civic Learning and Democratic Engagement

Robert Reason, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Student Affairs and Higher Education, Iowa State University

Using data from the Personal and Social Responsibility Inventory (PSRI), Reason will explore the relationships between campus climates and cultures and students' development of civic learning and democratic engagement. The discussion will focus specifically on the strong relationships between positive learning environments, high impact practices, and students' learning that are transferrable to attendees' own campuses.

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Powerful Pathways in Creating Change: The Intersection of Social Entrepreneurship and Community Engagement

Micki Meyer, Lord Family Director of Community Engagement - Rollins College
Chrissy Garton, Director of Social Innovation - Rollins College

College students are deeply passionate about leveraging their education for social change. How can we as educators promote a shared vision of “changemaking” on campus that unites key faculty, staff, students and community partners in goals and experiences that cross disciplines and sectors? This interactive session will explore ideas and practices of establishing collaborative models for social entrepreneurship and civic engagement in order to successfully integrate changemaking across your campus.

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Democratic Dialogue for Civic Learning in Co-Curricular Activities

Daniel Blaeuer, Assistant Professor - Florida International University
Eric Feldman, Coordinator Office of Global Learning Initiatives - Florida International University
Beverly Dalrymple, Ed.D., Executive Director Center for Leadership & Service - Florida International University

The mini-institute is designed for participants who aspire to develop democratic dialogue initiatives on campus. The workshop introduces the theory of democratic dialogue and presents national assessment data on the value of co-curricular opportunities and collaborations. The workshop presents two models of democratic dialogue that have proven successful in Miami, Florida. The workshop will discuss practical considerations in Student Affairs/Academic Affairs partnerships in implementing democratic dialogue. Participates will gain the opportunity to workshop their own initiatives in break-out sessions with presenters.

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Promising Practices for Engaging Students in Politics

Margaret Brower, Program Administrator - NSLVE
Abby Kiesa, Youth Coordinator and Researcher -CIRCLE

This session offers universities and colleges an opportunity to learn about student registration and voting rate patterns across campuses based on findings from CIRCLE’s National Study of Learning, Voting, and Engagement (NSLVE).  The NSLVE research team will present an analysis of voting activity on NASPA CLDE campuses.  Following this presentation, there will be an interactive discussion of promising practices that encourage political participation.  During this discussion, different case studies will be shared from NSLVE’s qualitative research study and one campus from NASPA CLDE will share its own promising practices for engaging students.

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More than counting hours: Assessing meaningful civic outcomes

Bob Reason - Iowa State University
Cassie Barnhardt - University of Iowa

Join two experienced researchers, Dr. Bob Reason and Dr. Cassie Barnhardt, as they lead a conversation on how to use data to revitalize and lead a national conversation about higher education's role in developing college students' sense of personal and social responsibility, help campuses assess and refine environments that encourage such development, and engage students in activities.

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Using TurboVote to Institutionalize Voter Engagement On Your Campus

Adrienne Lever, Senior Director for Strategic Partnerships - TurboVote
Sam Novey, Director of Partnerships - TurboVote

With a federal election quickly approaching this fall, it's important for institutions to understand how new technology gives institutions the opportunity to move towards providing every student with all the information and materials he or she needs to vote in every election from local to presidential. This session will introduce the voter engagement platform TurboVote and outline the new exciting partnership between NASPA, AASCU and TurboVote. During the first half of the session, TurboVote staff will go through the technical nuts and bolts of the system and answer questions about how it works. In the latter half, administrators from LEAD institutions who have successfully implemented TurboVote will discuss the tactics they've used successfully. Finally, the session will end with a brief planning workshop for schools to figure out how to implement TurboVote on their campus for fall semester.

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Civics, Citizenship, and Saving the Democracy

Dee Dee Rasmussen, Executive Director - Florida Campus Compact
Michael Norris, Director of Member Services - Florida Campus Compact

How do you engage your students in their democracy? How do you advocate for civic education and engaged scholarship with local and state-wide elected officials? This train the trainer workshop will help you understand how our political system works and how to influence it. Together with basic civic knowledge, we will review the cultural and global contexts in which democracy is both deeply valued and deeply contested. Moreover, the competencies basic to democracy cannot be learned only by studying books; democratic knowledge and capabilities are honed through hands‐on, face‐to‐face, active engagement in the midst of differing perspectives about how to address common problems that affect the well‐being of the nation and the world. Civic learning that includes knowledge, skills, values, and the capacity to work with others on civic and societal challenges can help increase the number of informed, thoughtful, and public‐minded citizens well prepared to contribute in the context of the diverse, dynamic, globally connected United States. Civic learning should prepare students with knowledge and for action in our communities. Adapted from "A Crucible Moment: College Learning and Democracy's Future." (2012, Washington, D.C.: Association of American Colleges and Universities)

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"But knowing and being there are different things:" An Examination of Service-Learning

Lauren Murray, Graduate Student - University of Central Florida
Jarrad Plante, Graduate Student - University of Central Florida

Many researchers have identified the many benefits of service-learning, including increased social integration and feelings of belonging on campus, and improved academic performance. By engaging in grounded theory methodologies, the researchers sought to discover what ten undergraduate students really learned as a result of their international service-learning experiences. In this presentation, participants will learn about how to apply grounded theory methodologies to their own assessment activities and the outcomes of this investigation of the learning associated with service-learning.

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HOT TOPICS: Student-to-Student Cultural Dialogues

Henry Ward, Director Intercultural Advancement - Loyola Marymount University
Maria Grandone, Executive Director Ethnic and Intercultural Services - Loyola Marymount University
Brittany Rosario-Gregory, Intercultural Facilitator - Loyola Marymount University
Alexander Holmes, Intercultural Facilitator - Loyola Marymount University

Loyola Marymount University has created one of its most innovative and effective methods of cultural engagement, the Intercultural Facilitator (IF) Program. The IF Program is a diverse cadre of 25 highly skilled students who engage other students in meaningful exchanges of ideas. The IFs understand conflict is a part of developing healthy relationship and they provide a coordinated effort to address a variety of social issues and concerns. This is a powerful practice that encourages dialogue, debate and understanding.

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Infusing Civic Learning into Career Services’ Programs, Assessment and Operations.

Amy Bravo, Assistant Dean, Career Services - New York Institute of Technology
John Hyde, Dean, Career Services - New York Institute of Technology

Career Services is more than a placement office. It can create programs that educate global citizens that apply classroom learning to public problem solving. This session outlines the creation and success of internship, work-study, and civic engagement programs that prepare students, faculty and employers for professional and community success.

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Moving Beyond the "Like" button- New Ways to Engage in Social Change

Ryan Murphy, Director of Service-Learning - Chestnut Hill College
Emily Schademan, Director of Student Activities - Chestnut Hill College

Participants will examine the ways in which people engage in “passive activism.” This concept is operationalized as methods of civic engagement and social change that do not require traditional forms of participation like community service, but rather rely heavily on low-intensity participation techniques such as clicking “Like” on Facebook. This program will help professionals work with their student leaders to embrace a more active form of social justice engagement, and inspire those around them to do the same.

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Sustaining Partnerships in Sustainable Development: The St. Thomas University/Port-de-Paix, Haiti, Global Solidarity Project

Anthony Vinciguerra, Director, Center for Community Engagement - St. Thomas University

How can universities leverage their limited resources to both optimize student learning as well as support long-term community impact in developing countries? The St. Thomas University/Port-de-Paix, Haiti, Global Solidarity Partnership provides one model of how multiple levels of engaged scholarship can be project-focused to enhance student learning, empower local communities, and support long-term development.

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What are students learning and how do we help?: Four themes for practitioner reflection.

Steve Mills, Associate Director, Center for Leadership and Social Change - Florida State University
Jillian White, Service-Learning Coordinator - Florida State University

Community engagement can be a deeply impactful component of a student’s experience. However, we know learning is not only the result of the engagement itself, but often requires guided reflection as a catalyst for growth and understanding. In this highly interactive session, student affairs practitioners will explore four themes that result from students’ engagement in the community, and discuss best practices and frameworks for helping students make the most of these experiences.

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Assessing Campus Climate: The Personal and Social Responsibility Inventory

Kevin M Hemer, Research Assistant - Iowa State University
Joshua J Mitchell, Research Assistant - Iowa State University
Robert D Reason, Associate Professor of Education - Iowa State University

This session features a presentation examining using campus climate for assessment focusing on personal and social responsibility. It will build around the Personal and Social Responsibility Inventory, a partnership of the Association of American Colleges and Universities (AAC&U) and Iowa State University. The presentation will examine the five dimensions of personal and social responsibility, take a look at using campus climate to assess personal and social responsibility, and begin a discussion of effective ways to conduct assessment on campus.

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Measuring Student Community Engagement - The National Assessment of Service and Community Engagement

Pete Cichetti, Assistant Director - National Assessment of Service and Community Engagement (NASCE)
Micki Meyer, Lord Family Director of Community Engagement - Rollins College

The National Assessment of Service and Community Engagement (NASCE) is a survey of undergraduate students – conducted by the Siena College Research Institute – that measures an institution's overall levels of community engagement by evaluating the rate, frequency, and depth of student community service activities, as well as perceptions of, motivations for, and obstacles to serving. To date Siena has administered the NASCE at more than 50 colleges and universities across the country, with a combined dataset of over 30,000 student responses.

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Election 2014: How to Help Your Students Register and Vote

Michael Burns, Director - Campus Vote Project

Campus Vote Project will discuss ways that student affairs professionals can institutionalize reforms on campus that will empower students with the information they need to vote in the 2014 elections. The presentation will give a brief legal background related to student voting, including the Higher Education Act's requirement that schools provide voter registration and a look at the wide range of nonpartisan election activities that colleges and universities are allowed to engage in to encourage student registration and voting.

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Staying on the Same Page: Incorporating a Tiered Model for Transparent Partnerships

Scott Ball, Community Partner Coordinator - Weber State University

One of the challenges in creating sustainable partnerships between universities and community agencies is managing shifting responsibilities and expectations. The tiered partnership structure at Weber State has allowed for these to be addressed by both, community organizations and the university, leading to truly collaborative partnerships. During this session, we will explore basic information about the tiered partnership structure utilized at Weber State, but the focus will be how to use clearly defined tiers to ensure reciprocity between campus-community partnerships.

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The impact of a mandatory service component at two Mexican Higher Education Institutions

Alicia Canton, Director of Student Affairs - Universidad de Monterrey
Enrique Ramos, National Student Affairs Director - Tecnologico de Monterrey

Many institutions of higher education share the purpose of educating socially responsible citizens. In Mexico, where 52 percent of the population lives below the national poverty line, the higher education system plays a key role in promoting change. Mexico is one of the few countries that have a mandatory service component for students enrolled in higher education. This requirement benefits marginalized sectors of society while raising students’ awareness and deepening their sense of social responsibility. How is the component operationalized? What benefits do students get from engaging? The cases on how two higher education institutions manage the mandatory service component will be presented as well as findings from a research study that shows the benefits of the component for the student.

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The Impact of Immersion: Academic/Student Affairs Partnerships to Advance Civic Learning

Chris Hutchison, Director, Student Engagement - Chapman University
Justin Koppelman, Assistant Director of Student Engagement for Civic Engagement Initiatives - Chapman University

This program will highlight an example of a unique collaborative partnership involving student affairs, academic affairs, and a community non-profit to enhance, and expand, students’ understanding of, and commitment to, civic learning and engagement. Employing the principles of engaging academic experiences and student development theory, Chapman University’s “Leadership Through the Eye of the Storm” travel course uses the Hurricane Katrina catastrophe as the lens to critically examine leadership, social change, and civic engagement, while building students’ capacity to take action.

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Two Models for Promoting Civil Dialogue Around Democratic Issues

Anne Weiss, Service Learning Scholar, PhD Student - IUPUI
Emma Humphries, Assistant in Citizenship - University of Florida

Presenters will describe two models for promoting civil dialogue around important democratic issues on a college campus—Democracy Plaza at IUPUI and The Civil Debate Wall at the University of Florida (UF). This session offers important insights for practitioners seeking to promote not just civil dialogue, but also a culture of civility and democratic engagement, on their respective campuses. Whether armed with a budget of one million or one thousand dollars, campuses can and should create spaces for meaningful dialogue.

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Developing Political Engagement Through Connecting Course Objectives to Current Events

Christopher Jensen, Director - Towson University

Developing political engagement beyond voting for college students is not always easy. Through the Collegiate Readership Program, the Office of Civic Engagement assessed the degree to which reading the newspaper assisted students in developing an awareness of political engagement. This workshop with discuss the program and results will be presented on how it has enhanced the students overall course experience and to what degree the readership program has developed Civic and Political Engagement competencies.

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Strategic Civic Engagement Opportunities with TurboVote

Adrienne Lever, Senior Director for Strategic Partnerships - TurboVote
Sam Novey, Director of Partnerships - TurboVote

TurboVote’s platform is innovative online platform that offers a "one-stop-shop" online voter registration and engagement service to students. During the session, NASPA institutions partnering with TurboVote will share best practices for institutionalizing voter engagement on their campuses and demonstrate how they used TurboVote to advance civic action as a life-long practice. The goal of this session will be to a) present a clear picture of the opportunities for institutions to play a significant role in promoting civic learning through strategic voter engagement efforts, b) support institutions in their effort to understand and comply with the mandate under the Higher Education Act(s) to make a “good faith” effort to register their students to vote and c) outline the ways in institutions can use TurboVote as a tool to conduct voter engagement in a cost-effective, time-efficient way.

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From Volunteering to Active Citizenship: Transforming a Campus Climate

Lauren Loeffler, Director, Career Services - University of West Florida
Benjamin Stubbs, Associate Director, University Commons and Student Involvement - University of West Florida

The University of West Florida (UWF) adopted the social change model as a way to frame leadership programs at the Institution. In order to evaluate the students' commitment to the seven C's of leadership, the Multi-institutional Study of Leadership was administered. Results from that assessment showed that UWF students scored lowest in the area related to citizenship. This knowledge, coupled with the university's quest for Carnegie Community Engagement Classification, provided the platform by which Student Affairs began to reframe "volunteering" and focus on active citizenship and social responsibility. Leadership and service programs are being created to address and assess these efforts. This program tracks the journey from Volunteering to Active Citizenship, citing the evidence that initated this shift, strategies for fostering Active Citizenship, and the ways in which the University will assess these efforts.

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Spring Cleaning: Dusting Away the Cobwebs of Volunteer Services to Make Room for Better Citizens

Jordan Smith, Coordinator of Civic Engagement & Orientation - Coastal Carolina University

Volunteerism has long been the go-to catalyst for encouraging “good citizenship” in higher education, but democracy and civility are no longer buzzwords for the modern college student. We will pick apart the dynamic rebranding at Coastal Carolina University that was necessary to modernize a volunteer-centric program and create a wider model that connects the entire campus with democratic responsibility. This tell-all session will help you navigate the messy collaboration that is involved when rejuvenating any civic engagement movement.

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UM Civic Scholars Program: An Innovative Student Affairs and Academic Affairs Partnership

Robin Bachin, Charlton W. Tebeau Associate Professor of History and Assistant Provost for Civic and Community Engagement - University of Miami
Andrew Wiemer, Director of the William R. Butler Center for Volunteer Service and Leadership Development - University of Miami

Civic learning provides students with an opportunity for hands-on, experiential, and transformative education. During this session, presenters explore the challenges and successes of an innovative civic learning initiative, the UM Civic Scholars Program, and offer strategies for addressing these issues through collaborative programming between Student Affairs and Academic Affairs. This presentation provides a model for a cohesive program that aims to reward students for community engagement at the curricular and co-curricular levels and ties together students’ experiences in a comprehensive way.

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CLEWS for Building Community Leaders: Can Civic Participation Increase Retention?

Mark Wagner, Director, Center for Service Learning and Civic Engagement - Worcester State University

In September 2012, The Center for Service Learning and Office of Residence Life welcome a (first) living learning community at WSU. As designed, the Community Leadership Experience, called CLEWS, invites students who apply with a 2.7 – 3.2 GPA and who have indicated on their applications an interest in service. Our preliminary goals include smoothing the transition from home to college, encouraging campus citizenship, and supporting social change. In September 2013, we welcomed our second CLEWS cohort and also welcomed the original cohort into a sophomore seminar on Community Leadership. This presentation will review the assessment of our first two years and create interactions with the audience in creating innovative programming aimed at retention and civic engagement on campus.

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Controversy and Civility within Campus Demonstrations: Creating a Culture of Democratic Engagement

Pam Rault, Director of Student Health Services - University of New Orleans
Dale O'Neill, Director of Student Involvement and Leadership - University of New Orleans

Student Affairs professionals play a vital role in preparing students for responsible citizenship. Through participation in campus protests, students at the University of New Orleans have had the ability to embrace their right to freedom of expression. However, repeated controversies have made this institution re-evaluate its approaches to fostering democratic engagement. In this session, presenters will describe best practices to creating a campus-wide ethos for civic engagement that encourages students to engage in demonstrations in a civil and educational manner.

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Giving Civic Engagement a “Beach Front” Location

Jonathan Hilsher, Director of Civic Engagement - Alfred State College
Greg Sammons, Vice President for Student Affairs - Alfred State College

The physical location and accessibility to spaces dedicated to student community engagement is important component of inspiring involvement and building a campus culture of civic engagement. Strategically placed and oriented spaces can also be leveraged to build civic capacity and public scholarship through partnering with community organizations and other divisions within the campus. Learn promising practices and clear takeaways on leveraging and/or repurposing space to support your civic mission and enhance student success.

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Head, Heart, Hand: Global Civic Engagement at an Access Institution

Dr. Maria Arvelo Lumpkin, Head, Heart, Hand: Global Civic Engagement Partnerships Around the World - Georgia Gwinnett College

Georgia Gwinnett College (GGC) graduates are inspired to contribute to the local, state, national and international communities, and are prepared to anticipate and respond effectively to an uncertain and changing world. One of the strategic goals of GGC’s Office of Internationalization has been to increase the number of GGC students participating in education abroad programs across disciplines; and expand student participation in a broad range of other international opportunities including but not limited to internships, research fellowships and global civic engagement/service learning. In addition, the Office of Student Involvement at GGC plays a major role in fostering, supporting and coordinating community engagement and service learning efforts for GGC faculty, staff and students with the local, regional and national community. This session is designed to share Best Practices of GGC's Global Civic Engagement partnerships that builds congruent bridges between academic and student affairs at an access institution.

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Reinvent Reflection through Digital Storytelling: The Pedagogical Strategy and How-To

Kristin Norris, Director of Assessment - IUPUI
Anne Weiss, Service Learning Scholar, PhD Student - IUPUI
Jen Halford, Program Director, Community Service and Civic Engagement - IUPUI

Digital storytelling is a pedagogical strategy that incorporates technology to facilitate the reflection process in a way that enables students to organize their experiences in a way that results in deeper learning. Participants will learn about this pedagogy, the importance of this practice in documenting student development, and research findings that indicate their value in providing evidence of civic growth and development.

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Student Poll Worker Programs: Giving Students Hands-On Experience With Democracy

Michael Burns, Director - Campus Vote Project

Working at a polling place on Election Day can provide students with a valuable lesson about how democracy functions, increase long-term enthusiasm in the democratic process, and ensure that student voters’ rights are protected. The Fair Elections Legal Network, a nonpartisan voting rights organization, interviewed college administrators who managed student poll worker programs around the country. This session will feature lessons learned and best practices for recruitment, retention, training and collaborating with election officials.

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Reception - Sponsored by Florida Campus Compact and Miami Dade College

Join Florida Campus Compact and Miami Dade College for fellowship in the historic Freedom Tower. For many thousands of immigrants, the historic tower provided nothing less than their freedom from Castro and the hardships Cuba had come to give them. It rightly earned its name of Freedom Tower. For many thousands of immigrants, the historic tower provided nothing less than their freedom from Castro and the hardships Cuba had come to give them. It rightly earned its name of Freedom Tower.
The tower is located a short 0.7 mile walk south of the Hilton Miami Downtown on Biscayne Boulevard in the heart of downtown Miami's nightlife. Stop by the reception with colleagues on your way to experience all that Miami has to offer in fine dining, shopping, and nightlife! Meet in the hotel lobby following the final general interest session of the day to walk or share cabs with fellow conference attendees. For those requiring accomodations for mobility, please let a conference staff member know at conference registration. Conference staff will arrange for transportation and an escort into the building.

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Small Colleges and Universities Roundtable

Grab your breakfast and join colleagues for a discussion.

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Closing Plenary Session: What You Need to Know and Do to be an Effective Citizen

Senator Bob Graham, Former Florida Governor and Florida Senator

Join Bob Graham, Former Florida Governor and Florida Senator as he discusses his passion and vision for civic engagement. Senator Bob Graham is an accomplished speaker and author of four books including, America: The Owner’s Manual, Making Government Work for You. He has a wealth of experience and knowledge gained during the 38 total years he spent in public service. He currently serves as the chair of the council of advisors to the Bob Graham Center for Public Service at the University of Florida. Senator Graham will discuss the current state of civic engagement and share his ideas to inspire civic-reform and a reemergence of engagement with the democratic principles upon which America was founded.

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From Civic Volunteerism to Political Engagement at Saint Louis University

Leah Sweetman, Assistant Director, Center for Service and Community Engagement - Saint Louis University
Bryan Sokol, Director, Center for Service and Community Engagement - Saint Louis University
Diana Carlin, Associate Vice President for Graduate Education and International Initiatives - Saint Louis University
Ramona Hicks, Assistant Vice President and Dean of Students - Saint Louis University

Saint Louis University students are energized to make a difference in others’ lives by engaging in high levels of service, but they rarely show commitment to political engagement or an enduring interest in activities that make a real social change. In this presentation, the panel will highlight recent civic initiatives across the University’s Divisions of Student Development and Academic Affairs, including voter engagement efforts and the opening of the new Center for Global Citizenship.

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Infusing Civic Engagement In Your Student Staff Training

Brandon Martin, Coordinator for Civic Engagement and Student Leadership Programs - Ramapo College of New Jersey
Karen Booth, Assistant Director of Civic Engagement - Ramapo College of New Jersey

Student employees are often times your most active and passionate campus leaders. Student staff training is an incredible opportunity to engage these impressive individuals in meaningful activities and conversations. At Ramapo College of New Jersey, we have re-committed our student staff training to create a culture of civic learning and democratic engagement with the hope that these student leaders will translate their experiences to the rest of the campus community. Join us for an overview of our last training, and to brainstorm ways you can use these opportunities to highlight civic engagement.

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Short-Term Immersion Programs: An Assessment of Holistically Engaged Learning

Jessica Mann, Assistant Director - Robert Morris University

Alternative Spring Breaks (ASB) are a type of short-term immersion programming that have gained popularity as a means of fostering civic mindedness among students. While there has been a proliferation of ASB programs, most institutions have not assessed their programs in terms of participant civic learning outcomes. This session introduces attendees to the findings from a study of Robert Morris University’s program while providing the opportunity to discuss their own assessment initiatives and learning outcome measurement techniques with one another.

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Tapping Into Adult Students’ Dormant Desire to Integrate, Participate and Become Engaged

Carl Letamendi, PhD Candidate - Nova Southeastern University
Jazmin Letamendi, PhD Candidate - Nova Southeastern University

It is undeniable that the face of the average student is changing in the university setting. Changes in career paths, economic and environmental factors, and other reasons may draw adult students back to the classroom. These adult students bring with them a plethora of variables that impede their ability to become active and engaged students on campus when compared to the traditional undergrad-aged student population. Full-time jobs, parental responsibilities, financial impediments, and other family obligations may prevent adult students from contributing to student life. This interactive presentation identifies some of the potential hindrances that cause adult students to not be able to or not want to participate in university activities, provides potential avenues to intrigue adult students to become engaged in the campus community and discusses successful examples of how adult students have become so enthused with campus activities that they unquestionably volunteer their time.

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What You Do Matters: A Chicago Partnership Inspires Students to Become Agents for Positive Change

JoAnna Wasserman, Education Initiatives Manager - United States Holocaust Memorial Museum
Kevin Sella, Program Coordinator, Student Leadership Institute - DePaul University
Graci Martsching, Assistant Director, Student Involvement and Multicultural Services - St. Mary's College
Jimmy Brown, Associate Director, Student Leadership Development - University of Chicago
Emma Pettit, Program Director - International Institute for Sustained Dialogue

A living memorial, the Holocaust Museum inspires citizens to confront hatred, prevent genocide, and promote human dignity. When the Museum premiered a traveling exhibition in Chicago, a partnership with student affairs was initiated. It culminated in a leadership summit tackling challenges campuses face today: hate, indifference, and flagging civic engagement. The summit brought together students from 10 area institutions, empowering them to find allies and build coalitions, generating action on a core challenge: How can we create environments where hate cannot flourish? In this session, Museum educators, student participants, and student affairs professionals share their experience collaborating to create a unique platform for dialogue and leadership development.

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Developing a Co-curricular and Curricular Civic Engagement Partnership: A Case Study

Sarah Brackmann, Director of Civic Engagement - Southwestern University

Drawing on the presenter’s professional experiences in both student affairs and academic affairs, this presentation highlights best practices of partnering between the two by specifically focusing on a curricular and co-curricular civic engagement program. Using Southwestern University as a case study, the presenter will highlight the emphasis on student learning as the foundation of this partnership, and demonstrate how AAC&U’s civic learning outcomes are used to draw mutual support and understanding from faculty, practitioners, and community organizations.

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Developing Students in Sustained Partnerships: A Pathway to Capacity Building Placements

Annie Pasqua, National Program Director - The Bonner Foundation

The Bonner Program mobilizes students, faculty, and staff to provide a collaborative and community-driven process for civic engagement. Our programs places a high emphasis on developing student and community partners. Students take on additional responsibilities and leadership roles within community partners through the Bonner Student Development Model. To support these higher level placements for students and partners, we’ve developed resources for creating and assessing capacity building placements. This session will highlight these resources and share experiences from our network.

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Growing Leadership in STEM: Producing Great Scientists and Citizens

Meaghan Miller Thul, Assistant Director, CBS Student Servcies - University of Minnesota
Meaghan Stein, Coordinator for Student Engagement - University of Minnesota

Service-learning opportunities and discussions about civic responsibility are common in many disciplines; however, for students pursuing STEM, incorporating these important aspects of personal development require additional attention. The University of Minnesota offered 61 community engagement courses in Spring 2014, yet only three had STEM departmental sponsorship. The College of Biological Sciences at the UofM has engaged our students in service through an innovative leadership program, resulting in greater participation in service and stronger outcomes on various dimensions of civic responsibility.

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Moving Beyond Traditional Community Service: An Academic Framework for Community Based Learning

Jennifer Johnson Kebea, Interim Director, Lindy Center for Civic Engagement - Drexel University
Will Harrison, Program Assistant, Lindy Center for Civic Engagement - Drexel University
Janeile Johnson, Office Manager, Lindy Center for Civic Engagement - Drexel University

Drexel University’s Lindy Center for Civic Engagement challenges students to extend beyond participating only in traditional community service experiences. Instead, students are exposed to enhanced opportunities to integrate impactful community based learning into their curriculum through first-year seminars and upper-division courses. This session will review the academic framework currently in place at Drexel and explore the development of necessary partnerships with faculty, key senior academic affairs professionals, and community organizations that helped to make this dynamic shift in practice possible.

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The Co-Curricular Transcript - You Complete Me. Documenting the Total Student Experience

Marva Craig, Vice President for Student Affairs - Borough Manhattan Community College/CUNY
Annette Bhatia, Civic Responsibility and Student Development Coordinator - Borough of Manhattan Community College/CUNY

The Co-Curricular Transcript (CCT), at Borough of Manhattan Community College (BMCC), has provided a way to promote and assist students in officially documenting civic engagement, leadership opportunities and learning experiences outside of the classroom. When coupled with the academic transcript, the CCT helps students and institutions provide a comprehensive holistic representation of a student’s higher education experience. This session will review the grass roots approach used by the Division of Student Affairs at BMCC to get campus-wide buy-in for the CCT. In addition, the presenters will showcase the various marketing strategies employed by the different constituents in the college to increase program participation. They will also share the assessment strategies that will be used to ensure that the program continues to be effective and discuss the importance of increasing student civic engagement with the local community.

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Using Reflective Practice to Assess Student Learning Outcomes for Civic Learning and Democratic Engagement

Mary Slade, Executive Director, VCU ASPiRE - Virginia Commonwealth University
Nerice Lochansky, Assistant Director, VCU ASPiRE - Virginia Commonwealth University

Most, if not all, higher education programs pledge to develop civic-minded students through curricular and co-curricular experiences. The VCU ASPiRE program staff conducted an assessment of the impact of civic engagement on undergraduate students in a living-learning community focused on community engagement. The assessment consisted of an emergent theme analysis of students’ written reflections on community engagement. The reflections were studied for evidence of student impact for current and future engagement endeavors. The results of this study are presented along with the implications for informing educational programming. Replication is discussed.

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Senator Bob Graham

Former Florida Governor and Florida Senator and Chair


Senator Bob Graham is the former two–term governor of Florida and served for 18 years in the United States Senate. This is combined with 12 years in the Florida legislature for a total of 38 years of public service. Bob Graham retired from public service in January 2005, following his Presidential campaign in 2004.

Bob Graham is recognized for his leadership on issues ranging from education, economic development, healthcare, environmental preservation and his service on the Senate Select Committee on Intelligence — including eighteen months as chairman in 2001–2002.

In recent years, Senator Graham was appointed by the President and served as Co-Chair of the National Commission on the BP Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill and Offshore Drilling.  This followed his service as a Commissioner on the Financial Crisis Inquiry Commission, as Chairman of the Commission on the Prevention of Weapons of Mass Destruction Proliferation and Terrorism and his service as a member of the CIA External Advisory Board. Currently he is serving on the federal St. Augustine 450th Commemoration Commission.

Senator Graham is also the author of several books. Work Days – Finding Florida on the Job: descriptions of early jobs in what became his 30 year commitment to over 400 work days; Intelligence Matters,  9/11 and the run up to the Iraq War from the perspective of the chair of the Senate Intelligence Committee, and Keys to the Kingdom, a novel of suspense which draws upon his background in government and intelligence. 

Senator Graham’s passion has been civic engagement. After retiring from public life, Senator Graham served for a year as a senior fellow at the Harvard Kennedy School of Government.  He participated in with the 2008 establishment of the Bob Graham Center for Public Service and currently serves as the chair of its council of advisors. He is co-chair of the Florida Joint Center on Citizenship which is devoted to enhanced civics education in primary and secondary schools. He serves on the board of the National Conference on Citizenship. In 2010 with Chris Hand, Graham co-authored America the Owner’s Manual: Making Government Work for You, which teaches the skills of civic participation.

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Barbara Jacoby, Ph.D.

Faculty Associate for Leadership and Community Service-Learning at the Adele H. Stamp Student Union – Center for Campus Life

Barbara Jacoby is Faculty Associate for Leadership and Community Service-Learning at the Adele H. Stamp Student Union – Center for Campus Life at the University of Maryland, College Park. In this role, she facilitates initiatives involving academic partnerships, service-learning, and civic engagement.  She is a Fellow of the University’s Academy for Excellence in Teaching and Learning and was a Center for Teaching Excellence – Lilly Fellow during the 2007-08 academic year.  She served as Senior Scholar for the Adele H. Stamp Student Union from 2005-2011, Director of the Office of Community Service-Learning from 2003 to 2005, Director of Commuter Affairs and Community Service from 1992 to 2003, and Director of the Office of Commuter Affairs from 1983 to 2003, all at the University of Maryland.

 

Dr. Jacoby has served as Campus Compact’s Engaged Scholar for Professional Development.  In addition, she is Senior Scholar for the National Clearinghouse for Commuter Programs.  She was Director of the National Clearinghouse for Commuter Programs from 1983 to 2003.

 

Dr. Jacoby received her Ph.D. from the University of Maryland in French Language and Literature in 1978.  She is Affiliate Associate Professor in the Department of Higher Education and Student Affairs, where she teaches doctoral and undergraduate courses.

 

Dr. Jacoby’s publications include six books and one in process:  The Student as Commuter: Developing a Comprehensive Institutional Response (ASHE-ERIC Higher Education Reports, 1989),  Service-Learning in Higher Education: Concepts and Practices (Jossey-Bass, 1996), Involving Commuter Students in Learning(Jossey-Bass New Directions for Higher Education, 2000), Building Partnerships for Service-Learning (Jossey-Bass, 2003), Civic Engagement in Higher Education (Jossey-Bass, 2009), Looking In, Reaching Out: A Reflective Guide for Community Service-Learning Professionals (with Pamela Mutascio, Campus Compact, 2010), and Service-Learning Essentials: Questions, Answers, and Lessons Learned (Jossey-Bass, anticipated 2014).

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Robert Reason, Ph.D.

Associate Professor of Student Affairs and Higher Education

Robert Reason is Associate Professor of Student Affairs and Higher Education at Iowa State University. Reason served in a similar position at Penn State University from 2003 to 2011, where he was also a Senior Research Associate in Penn State’s Center for the Study of Higher Education. He serves as the Program Coordinator of Iowa State’s Student Affairs program, in which he teaches courses related to student development theories, college student outcomes, social justice issues, and assessment in student affairs. He recently completed (with Patrick Terenzini) two comprehensive studies of first-year student learning outcomes at over 45 colleges and universities, and a third (with Bradley Cox), that included over 50 more colleges and universities. 


More recently, Dr. Reason has been serving as the Director of Research and Assessment for the Association of American Colleges and Universities’ (AAC&U) Core Commitments initiative. The Core Commitments initiative, and its related assessment project—the Personal and Social Responsibility Inventory (PSRI)—are designed to revitalize and lead a national conversation about higher education’s role in developing college students’ sense of personal and social responsibility, help campuses assess and refine environments that encourage such development, and engage students in activities that encourage them to fulfill their obligations in academic, campus, and global communities. Dr. Reason focuses much of his research and scholarship on the importance of personal and social responsibility in today’s higher education contexts.

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