2013-09-26

Student Health, Wellness, Counseling, and related Excellence Award

Category Abstract

The Student Health/ Wellness/ Counseling and related area award category recognizes excellence in programming the areas of student health, wellness, counseling, and other related areas. This category covers a breadth of topics and might include programming related to student wellbeing, mental health, and fitness. Additional areas to consider include student financial wellbeing, self-care, and self-advocacy.

Excellence Award Overview

NASPA recognizes the contributions of members who are transforming higher education through outstanding programs, innovative services, and effective administration. All NASPA members are encouraged to enter recently developed and/or longstanding programs and initiatives for consideration for the NASPA Excellence Awards.

Programs selected for recognition in each category will receive one of three designations: Gold, Silver, or Bronze. The gold recipients from each category will be further judged for the designations of Grand Gold, Grand Silver, and Grand Bronze.

Submissions will be due by October 23, 2018. There is no specific time by which your submission must be made on October 23, 2018. Gold Award recipients will be recognized at the 2019 NASPA Annual Conference in Los Angeles, CA. 

If the submission relates to a program that relies on substantive use of multimedia technology, a link to those materials should be embedded in the award submission. The materials must be accessible to committee members without the need for user identification or password.

  • Judging Criteria

    Entries within each category will be reviewed by a cross-section of experienced NASPA members. Three to five judges will independently review submissions using the following criteria:

    • Impact on student learning and success demonstrated through transition, retention, or achievement outcomes
    • Relevance to institutional mission and/or applicability to student affairs profession institutionally, regionally, or nationally
    • Success in addressing student needs or responding to critical campus concerns and issues
    • Involvement, inclusion, and collaboration with academic affairs and other campus departments in planning and implementation
    • Use of innovative and creative methods, practices, or activities including the use of social media and emerging learning technologies
    • Application of available or emerging theoretical models, practical research, and program assessment


    In addition, submissions will also be assessed for the quality of the program description, explanation of concepts, and clarity of writing. Please see this link for the rubric which will be used for assessment.

  • Recognition

    Gold Award recipients will:

    • Be placed in consideration for the NASPA Grand Gold Medal, NASPA Grand Silver Medal and NASPA Grand Bronze Medal designating the top three programs or initiatives.
    • Receive NASPA Excellence Awards Certificates of Gold.
    • Be prominently displayed at the NASPA Annual Conference.
    • Be invited to participate in a poster session recognizing all Gold Award recipients during the NASPA Annual Conference.
    • Be showcased in a collection of Gold Award recipients on the NASPA Excellence Awards web resource center.
    • Receive letters of commendation sent by NASPA to the institution's president, chief student affairs officer, and selected local media to announce the achievement.


    Silver and Bronze Award recipients will:

    • Receive NASPA Excellence Awards Certificates of Silver or Bronze.
    • Be included in a collection of selected entries on the NASPA Excellence Awards web resource center.
    • Receive letters of commendation from NASPA to the institution's president and chief student affairs officer.


    Grand Medal recipients:

    • The Gold Award recipient in each category will be further considered for the highest awards for program excellence -- the NASPA Grand Gold Medal, the NASPA Grand Silver Medal and the NASPA Grand Bronze Medal. The recipients of these three grand awards will be recognized during the NASPA Annual Awards Luncheon.

Excellence Awards


Award Information

Nominations for the 2018-2019 NASPA Excellence Awards are now closed. Winners will be announced in January.

Nominations for the 2019-2020 NASPA Excellence Awards will open in summer 2019. 

Requirements

To be considered for a NASPA Excellence Award, you must submit the following information:

  • Correspond to Excellence Award category
  • Program title
  • Executive summary (500 words or less)
  • Information around Student Learning and/or Success, Mission and/or Advancement of Student Affairs, Student and/or campus needs, Collaboration and Sustainability, Originality and creativity, and Application of Research, Theory, and Assessment
  • Letters of support (maximum of three)

Current Excellence Award Recipients

  • Grand Bronze Winner
    Gold Winner
    [email protected]: Scalable & Personalized Student Well-being

    Colorado State University

    As an upstream approach to suicide prevention, [email protected] is an innovative digital platform that connects students to customized online evidence-based/informed and campus resources to increase resilience. [email protected] accomplishes this goal as a comprehensive well-being portal that meet students on their terms via laptops, tablets, and smartphones. The portal is the result of a unique partnership between Colorado State University and Grit Digital Health, whose teams strive to foster student resilience, health, and success. Beginning with primary research and focus groups in 2014, our joint team gained the insight that the majority of students who stop-out do so in good academic standing. Additionally, fifty percent of students who stop-out due to a behavioral health condition have not accessed on-campus supports for that condition.[1] Furthermore, students who stop-out often specifically site reasons outside of academics as their primary challenge, including: “being emotionally depressed or distressed,” “feelings of isolation,” or “feelings of not belonging.” With these facts, it was clear that addressing issues outside of the classroom, specifically related to behavioral health and well-being, were essential to supporting the health and educational success of students. [email protected] has been embraced by students and faculty alike – as demonstrated by impressive user engagement and cross-departmental adoption. Specifically, 87 percent of student users reported learning about a new campus resource, 76 percent reported adopting skills to better manage their stress, and 98 percent of first year users reported learning new skills, tips and/or resources to support their academics, physical health, mental health and campus connections. Since its launch in spring of 2016, [email protected] has undergone continuous evaluation to improve the platform, propel its reach and impact, and ensure sustainability. Based on student feedback and user testing, [email protected] was designed to have resources that span three domains: Succeed – academic and career success; Thrive – physical and mental well-being; and Matter – campus involvement and purpose. This approach ensures that the portal has utility for each and every student on campus leading to widespread adoption. To further ensure engagement, the portal was designed to cater specific content to each unique student based on several variables – for example, the portal populates personalized content for students based on their self-reported demographics. Furthermore, the portal includes engaging screening tools that provide personalized feedback and resources encouraging action in respects to their academics, health, and campus involvement as a scalable intervention. While personalized, the portal maintains student confidentiality/anonymity; however, allows administrators the ability to view aggregate user metrics allowing for proactive resource planning. These metrics can furthermore be filtered by time of year, as well as specific demographic variables. To date, [email protected] has had over 55,000 unique visitors to the site with an average time spent of over three minutes (an eternity in the digital space). As a scalable intervention, the portal has been customized and launched at an additional 20+ campuses of varying institutional types including large state, small private liberal arts, community college, and professional schools.


    View All Current Recipients
    Links
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  • Silver Winner
    Lula Bell's Resource Center at Davidson College

    Davidson College

    Lula Bell’s is a holistic resource center, under the Center for Civic Engagement at Davidson College, that provides resources for students based on the needs identified in student surveys. In addition to physical resources (e.g., food, clothing, textbooks), Lula Bell’s also offers programming surrounding topics of social justice, as well as practical life skills, such as financial planning and car maintenance. Both the resources and the programming available in Lula Bell’s are intentionally focused on the holistic development of students. Physical wellness is supported by the nutritional food options available, hygiene products, winter clothing to protect from the elements and workshops on preparing low-cost healthy meals. Social wellness is supported by providing resources to feel comfortable in other spaces (professional clothing and textbooks), workshops on financial wellness and other life skills, and a community of people interested in discussing similar issues and community challenges. The idea for this center began in a Division of Student Life staff retreat and the demand was immediately confirmed by students and other groups requesting more resources to support those with financial need. A committee was formed with constituents from across campus, including students, staff, and faculty, to discuss the needs and opportunities specific to our unique community. Members of the committee prepared a survey to collect data for consideration along with the anecdotal evidence. The survey (adapted from one used by the College & University Food Bank Alliance) response rate was an incredible 50% of the entire student population. Using that data, along with information from other sources about hunger on college campuses, and research on what other campuses are doing, the committee finalized a list of requisites for the center. One concern from the committee, as well as the students surveyed, was who would shoulder the costs and how it could be sustained. An incredibly generous donor was identified, and they believed wholeheartedly in the purpose of the space so plans moved forward. Currently, Lula Bell’s offers free access to resources (for borrow or keep) including food (weekly access to the stocked kitchen, meal swipes for the cafeteria, recovered meals, and a summer discounted grocery), hygiene products, cleaning products, cooking equipment, clothing (professional and winter), textbooks (including access codes for online resources), text prep books and school supplies. However, the center continues to assess student needs and modify resources accordingly. In addition to resources, students have the opportunity to volunteer in the space and better understand how an organization is run. In September Lula Bell’s celebrated its first anniversary on campus and already usage has gone up 500% with more than 1,000 resource visits each semester. That’s in addition to those who attend programming events!


    View All Current Recipients
    Links
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  • Bronze Winner
    Mental Well-being for Student Success (MWell4Success) at the University of South Florida – Tampa

    University of South Florida

    Current evidence regarding determinants of discontinuation among college students notes the association between poor mental health and academic problems, making it more difficult for students to stay enrolled and complete their degree on time. Stressors related to higher education pursuits might precipitate an underlying mental health condition such as depression, or lead to poor coping and self-descriptive patterns such as escalation of substance use. In addition to academic problems, poor mental health can negatively affect decisions and behaviors (e.g., withdrawal, over-commitment leading to failure) in both academic pursuits and extracurricular activities, thereby reducing the student’s sense of connectedness to the college environment. Mental health and substance use among young adults are major public health concerns because of their impact on well-being, safety, and individual productivity. Analogous to universities across the country, the University of South Florida (USF) counseling and health centers have seen increasing numbers of students with mental health issues including depression, suicide ideation, in addition to an increase in the number of crisis visits and involuntary psychiatric hospitalizations. Using a systems-thinking, public health approach, improving mental wellbeing among the USF student body requires collaboration across micro, meso, and macro systems in addition to the creation of communication infrastructures in order to foster improvements in organizational structures and functions. Public health approaches aim to provide the maximum benefit for the largest number of people. As such, a whole-population, strength-based approach that proactively addresses the mental health needs of all students through the following MWell4Success tiered programming: a) Tier 1: Comprised of universal mental health promotion aimed at enhancing competencies and optimizing positive mental health among all USF students; b) Tier 2: Targeted and at-risk programming via primary and secondary prevention initiatives with the goal of reducing risks, minimizing health problems, and ensuring early detection; and c) Tier 3: Intensive individualized programming comprised of secondary and tertiary interventions to increase the number of students who receive mental health treatment, reduce the effects of mental illness, and restore mental health and overall quality of life. Evaluation results of Tier 1 programming reveal statistically significant improvements in mental health literacy among college students, a 410% increase in the number of male students who use TAO online self-help modules, over 140 faculty/staff trained in mental health first aid. Tier 2 programming results reveal the increased counseling center usage and an improved counselor/student ratio through satellite centers with extended hours, in addition to over 400 students utilizing Success & Wellness Coaching services for stress management, time management, and procrastination. Tier 3 programming resulted in improved collaborations between various units by providing wrap-around care. Evaluation results have been published in peer reviewed journals and presented at national conferences. Implications include the significant impact of taking a systems-thinking approach to addressing mental wellbeing as it related to student success and overall quality of life.


    View All Current Recipients
    Links
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Past Excellence Award Recipients

  • 2018
    Gold Winner
    Scarlet and Gray Financial


    The Ohio State University

    Learn More
  • 2018
    Silver Winner
    Mental Health Matters


    University of South Carolina

    Learn More
  • 2018
    Bronze Winner
    Intervene: Cornell’s New Evidence-Based Bystander Intervention Video and Workshop


    Cornell University

    Learn More
  • 2012
    Gold Winner
    Friends Helping Friends Campus Suicide Prevention Program

    Cherry Callahan
    University of North Carolina at Greensboro

    Read Materials
  • 2012
    Silver Winner
    Develop U: A Data-Driven Prevention Program

    Brenda Hawks
    Bentley University

    Read Materials
  • 2012
    Silver Winner
    LiveWell UC San Diego: A Campuswide Wellness Initiative

    Jerry Phelps
    University of California-San Diego

    Read Materials
  • 2010-11
    Gold Winner
    NYU's Health Center Without Walls

    Erin Callihan
    New York University

    Read Materials
  • 2010-11
    Silver Winner
    Campus and Community Coalition to Reduce High Risk Drinking

    Sally Linowski
    University of Massachusetts-Amherst

    Read Materials
  • 2010-11
    Bronze Winner
    An Innovative Approach to Address Financial Literacy on Campus: The SHSU Student Money Management Center

    Kristy Vienne
    Sam Houston State University

    Read Materials
  • 2009
    Gold Winner
    NYU’s Alcohol Education and Risk Reduction Programming

    Erin Callihan
    New York University

    Read Materials
  • 2009
    Silver Winner
    Sober 24/7: Reducing High Risk Drinking among first year students at St. John's University

    Jose Rodriguez
    St. John's University

    Read Materials
  • 2009
    Bronze Winner
    The MIT Screening and Brief Intervention Systemic Model (MIT-SBI)

    Daniel Trujillo
    Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    Read Materials
  • 2008
    Gold Winner
    The STEPS Alcohol Screening and Brief Intervention Program

    Maria Cimini
    University at Albany-SUNY

    Read Materials
  • 2008
    Silver Winner
    CHILL: Stony Brook's Peer-Based Outreach and Early Intervention for Depression

    Jenny Hwang
    Stony Brook University

    Read Materials
  • 2008
    Bronze Winner
    Using Curriculum Infusion to Decrease Adverse Consequences during Celebratory Drinking Events

    Allen Groves
    University of Virginia

    Read Materials
  • 2007
    Gold Winner
    A University Sexual Assault Response Team (SART): Moving Beyond Response to Action

    Amy Ballagh
    Georgia Southern University

    Learn More
  • 2007
    Silver Winner
    Building a Healthy Community: Sexual Assault Resources and Education Website

    W. Samuel Sadler
    College of William & Mary

    Learn More
  • 2007
    Bronze Winner
    "R.E.A.C.H."ing for the stars at UCR

    Jennifer Miller
    University of California-Riverside

    Learn More
  • 2006
    Gold Winner
    Go Ask Alice!

    Melissa Kenzig
    Columbia University

    Learn More
  • 2006
    Silver Winner
    Campus Connect: A Comprehensive Suicide Prevention Program

    Rebecca Dayton
    Syracuse University

    Learn More
  • 2006
    Bronze Winner
    Southwestern University "Alcohol Reality Check"

    John Ragle
    Southwestern University

    Learn More
  • 2005
    Gold Winner
    The Health Connection at Cedar Crest College

    Joan Laffey
    Cedar Crest College

    Learn More
  • 2005
    Silver Winner
    An Innovative Approach to Address Mental Health on Campus: The NYU Wellness Exchange

    Zoe Ragouzeos
    New York University

    Learn More
  • 2005
    Bronze Winner
    Combining wellness promotion and health marketing in a weekly e-mail: orangehealth-e

    James Jacobs
    Syracuse University

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