NASPA Careers:
AVP or “Number Two”

NASPA provides high-quality, relevant professional development opportunities for AVPs or “number twos” on campus. Whether you’re interested in networking, being the best AVP you can be, or professional development that prepares you for the jump to a CSAO position, there are NASPA programs and resources designed to support your career objectives.

Find a Job

Seeking a position as a campus AVP? Interested in a different “number two” role? Check out the opportunities available through The Placement Exchange.

 

The Placement Exchange (TPE)
The Placement Exchange
Go to TPE Website

AVP or “Number Two”
Publications

NASPA publications help to keep AVPs current in the rapidly changing fields of student affairs and higher education.

AVP or “Number Two”
Initiatives & Awards

In November, 2012, NASPA established the AVP Steering Committee to partner with NASPA staff to shape the ongoing development of NASPA’s AVP initiatives. The Steering Committee works to ensure that AVP-relevant programs are offered during regional and national events.

AVP Steering Committee

In November, 2012, NASPA established the AVP Steering Committee to partner with NASPA staff to shape the ongoing development…

NASPA Supporting, Expanding, and Recruiting Volunteer Excellence (SERVE) Academy

SERVE is a year and a half long program for mid-to-senior level professionals who want to gain knowledge about, and strategies for, enhancing their NASPA leadership and volunteer experiences and fully experiencing their professional association.

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