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September 19, 2023

Call for Programs Deadline

October 31, 2023

Early Bird Registration Deadline

December 5, 2023

Regular Registration Deadline

December 22, 2023

Hotel Deadline

NASPA Strategies Conferences

In-Person Conferences Health, Safety, and Well-being Alcohol and Other Drug Health, Safety, and Well-being Initiatives Sexual and Relationship Violence Prevention, Education, and Response Wellness and Health Promotion AVP or "Number Two" Faculty Mid-Level New Professional Senior Level

The NASPA Strategies Conferences provide student affairs practitioners with the knowledge and skills to effectively address collegiate alcohol and drug abuse prevention, mental health, sexual violence prevention and response, and well-being through a variety of comprehensive and integrative approaches.

Stay tuned for the 2025 NASPA Strategies Conferences details!

View the Full 2024 Conference Schedule Here!

Presented By

 Health, Safety, and Well-being Initiatives

The convergence of the NASPA Alcohol, Other Drug, and Violence Prevention, Mental Health, Sexual Violence Prevention and Response, Well-Being and Health Promotion Leadership, and the Peer Education conferences allows campus practitioners a unique opportunity to learn, network and engage.

 

Registration

Registration as a member is based on individual membership status at the time of the event. If your current membership will expire prior to the event, you will have the option to renew at the time of registration to receive the member rate.

If you are not a current member and are employed by a college or university that is an institutional member, you can join as a professional affiliate member for $80. If your institution is NOT a member, you can join as an associate affiliate member for $250. Both membership types provide access to the individual member rate for the event. Please visit the membership section of the NASPA website to learn more about membership types and benefits. We hope you’ll consider joining today!

For a comprehensive listing of NASPA registration policies, please visit this page.


The Strategies Conferences converge five events into one. Please select the conference which is most applicable to you, though you are welcome to attend sessions and presentations selected by any of the conference committees. 

Stay Tuned for 2025 Registration Details!

REGISTRATION FEES

Early Registration
04/01/2023 to 10/31/2023
 Regular Registration
11/01/2023 to 12/05/2023
Late Registration
12/06/2023 to 01/18/2024
NASPA Member 
 $525  $575  $650
Non Member
 $725 $775 $850
   NASPA Student Member
 $225  $275  $350

 

HALF-DAY PRE-CONFERENCE REGISTRATION

Early Registration  Regular Registration Late Registration
NASPA Member 
 $75  $95  $145
Non Member
 $175  $195  $245

FULL-DAY PRE-CONFERENCE REGISTRATION

Early Registration  Regular Registration Late Registration
NASPA Member 
 $125  $145  $195
Non Member
 $225  $245  $295

NASPA Foundation Scholarships

Pre-Conference Descriptions

Full-day Pre-Conference Institutes

Full-day pre-conference institutes will take place on Wednesday, January 17 from 9:00 a.m.- 5:00 p.m.

Orchestrating Drug/Alcohol Misuse Prevention Efforts: Tough Love for Meaningful Strategies

Presenters: David Anderson, Professor Emeritus of Education and Human Development at George Mason University; Rich Lucey, Senior Prevention Program Manager, Drug Enforcement Administration; Katrin Wesner-Harts, Director, Student Health Center, University of North Carolina-Wilmington; Kelly Truesdell, Assistant Director of The Fontaine Center, University of Georgia; Allison Smith, Assistant Commissioner for Student Health and Wellness, Louisiana Board of Regents; Shawnte Elbert, Chief Health Equity Officer, Walden University.

Drug and alcohol misuse permeate campus environments and affect students’ success, mental health, and quality of life. To make a substantive difference, leaders must demonstrate strong will and dedicated commitment to orchestrate grounded, evidence-informed, locally appropriate, and comprehensive approaches. Strategic planning, prevention science, persuasion skills and a clear vision combine to result in quality prevention efforts and positive change. This session is appropriate for campus and organization leaders seeking to embrace results.

Intersections Between the Clery Act and Title IX

Presenters: Laura Egan, Senior Director of Programs, Clery Center for Security on Campus; Keisha Coleman, Assistant Director of Programs, Clery Center for Security On Campus. 

The Clery Act and Title IX have distinct influence over campus safety policies and procedures, particularly for instances of dating violence, domestic violence, sexual assault, and stalking (DVSAS). However, it can be difficult to recognize how these two laws work together when many lack a foundational understanding of the Clery Act itself. We will review the requirements of the Clery Act and its intersections with Title IX and will skill-build on the creation of complete policies and procedures that meet the requirements of both laws.

Liberating Traditional Substance Misuse Prevention Structures to Better Align with the Values and Experiences of Today's Students

Presenters: Kimberly Timpf, Education Strategy Lead, Vector Solutions; Dyan Jenkins-Ali, Chief of Staff for the Chief Health officer, Office of the President, Associate Director, VOICES UHR- Strategy and Planning, and Adjunct Faculty, School of Public Health, University of Michigan.

Innovating to address substance misuse will require challenging the status quo, specifically, whether our students are best served by strategies proven effective nearly three decades and a generation ago. This hands-on workshop will examine these programs within in the context of generational values around safety, wellbeing, and inclusion, while providing attendees with an opportunity to build the skills needed to liberate our thinking around traditional prevention approaches in order to better meet the diverse needs of today’s students.

 

Half-day Morning (9-12pm) Pre-Conference Sessions

Half-day pre-conference sessions will take place on Wednesday, January 17 from 9:00 a.m. - 12:00 p.m.

Certified Peer Educator (CPE) Train-the-Trainer

Presenters: Warren Martin, NASPA

NASPA’s Certified Peer Educator (CPE) training is a fantastic training opportunity for your students that will provide a foundation for understanding the role of a peer educator and the way to effectively and successfully create change on campus and in their community. Campus staff members that work with peer educators can become CPE Trainers, enabling them to facilitate the CPE curriculum to their students, leading them through the training, and certifying them as Certified Peer Educators. For more information visit the CPE train-the-trainer website

Implementing Lasting Change: Navigating Buy-In and Managing Up for Impactful College Alcohol Prevention

Presenters: Jason Kilmer, Associate Professor of Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences, University of Washington; Brian Dietz, Associate Dean of Students, Kalamazoo College; Jennifer Jacobsen, Executive Director, Health & Wellness, Macalester College; Joan Masters, Project Director, Partners in Prevention, University of Missouri-Columbia.

This dynamic session explores the pivotal link between alcohol prevention, student well-being and institutional success. Through compelling case studies, from the initial launch of 360 Proof, gain insights into successfully fostering buy-in across campus, including senior leadership, for robust alcohol prevention programs. Uncover the keys to fostering student success while leaving with practical tools for initiating transformative change. Don't miss the chance to elevate your campus impact and drive meaningful results. This session is sponsored by 360 Proof – to learn more visit www.360proof.org

The Life of an AVP of Health and Wellbeing: Essential Leadership Strategies and Skills

Presenters: James Raper, Associate Vice President for Health, Well-Being, Access, and Prevention. Emory University; Robert Ernst, Associate Vice President of Student Life for Health and Wellness, University of Michigan; Sherrá Watkins, Associate Vice President for Student Health & Wellness, University of Utah; Chris Dawe, AVP, Health & Well-Being, University of Houston; Elizabeth Cracco, Assistant Vice Chancellor of Campus Life and Wellbeing, University of Massachusetts Amherst.

Moving from experience as a Director to an AVP/C role means you are no longer the chief content expert. This preconference will use the experiences of five seasoned AVPs of health and wellbeing to facilitate discussions focused on critical leadership skills, challenges and opportunities within this unique portfolio, and strategies for engaging campus communities to advance wellbeing. Participants will reflect on their own existing leadership skills and strengths as well as opportunities for growth and develop a plan to address them.

 

Half-day Afternoon (2-5pm) Pre-Conference Sessions

Half-day pre-conference sessions will take place on Wednesday, January 17 from 2:00 p.m. - 5:00 p.m.

Capacity Building Without Burnout: Creating A Personalized Well-being Experience

Presenters: Shawnte Elbert, Chief Health Equity Officer, Walden University; Sherra Watkins, Associate Vice President for Health and Wellness, University of Utah

The current landscape of mental health support in educational settings reveals disparities in access, equity, and inclusivity, hindering diverse and holistic prevention and interventions. This lack of comprehensive support undermines overall student well-being and threatens academic success. This presenter will highlight the pressing need for a transformative approach that addresses mental health equity and fosters a culture of inclusive, personalized, and effective interventions via real-world case studies, presentation, and small groups.

Create Programming that Works: Leveraging User-Centered Design to Drive Impact for Student Well-Being

Presenters: Monica Keele, Manager of Substance Misuse Prevention and Assessment, Colorado State University; Mia Trentadue, Senior Partner Success Manager - YOU at College.

Developing innovative and impactful student programming is both a joy and challenge of our work. This session will explore the steps and processes of user-centered design to co-create meaningful programming based on students’ wants and needs. This interactive pre-conference session will enable participants to apply this framework to create and evaluate programs that work for their campus - now and in the future.

Empowering Advisors: Strategies, Resources, and Best Practices for Peer Education

This session will be presented by the Peer Education Faculty, for more information click here.

The NASPA Peer Education Faculty looks to empower advisors to promote effective peer education, fostering enriched campus environments. This collaborative session will deepen collegiate peer health education advisors' understanding of the complex needs of diverse learners and will explore implementation approaches and best practices. Participants will learn from experts and from peers, develop their professional networks, gain access to resources and skills, and bring back new strategies and solutions to their campuses.

Health Promoting Universities: The Basics

Presenters: Sislena Ledbetter, Executive Director, Health and Wellness, Western Washington University; Jay Darr, Associate Dean, Student Wellness, University of Pittsburgh–Pittsburgh Campus; Kathleen Hatch, Associate Vice President, Kansas State University; M. Dolores Cimini, Director, Center for Behavioral Health Promotion and Applied Research, University at Albany; Charnequa Kennedy, Director, Counseling Services, North Carolina Central University

This session provides an overview of the Okanagan Charter and its key principles for action set forth by the International Health Promoting University and Colleges Network and supported by the US Health Promoting Campus Network. Participants will learn the basic elements of what it means to be a health promoting university and how to work toward a whole campus, settings and systems approach to promote wellbeing in person, place and planet.

Sustainably Engaging Faculty in Supporting Student Well-Being

Presenters: Jennifer Jacobsen, Executive Director, Health & Wellness, Macalester College; Andrea Tracy, Associate Dean for Student Academic Life, Grinnell College.

Faculty are essential partners in supporting student well-being; collaboration can be challenging for a variety of reasons. In this interactive session, presenters will offer opportunities for participants to discover and discuss strategies for student affairs professionals to engage faculty colleagues in three different contexts: (1) faculty-led work in curricular/academic settings (2) initiatives and activities primarily led by student affairs professionals and (3) in domains where faculty and student affairs roles significantly overlap.

Registration Policies

Refunds will be given for cancellations, received in writing by October 31, 2023, less a $50.00 processing fee. In addition, a processing fee of $50.00 per registration will be charged for credit cards declined.

For a comprehensive listing of NASPA registration policies, please visit this page.

Questions?
NASPA Events
Event Registration Support
Email: [email protected]
Phone: (202) 265-7500
NASPA Staff
Event Specific Support
Email: [email protected]

Schedule

The schedule has been designed to provide participants with interactive and engaging programming, opportunities for deeper discussion, and networking. The 2024 NASPA Strategies Conferences program book will be available in early January 2024. Registration to one conference grants access to content over all four conferences.

For a quick look at the 2024 tentative schedule, please see the schedule below. All listed schedule items below are tentative and subject to change. All times are PST.

2024 NASPA Strategies Conferences Full Schedule 
2024 NASPA Strategies Program Book
Wednesday
January 17
Thursday
January 18
Friday
January 19
Saturday
January 20
7:30 AM - 7:00 PM

Registration

9:00 AM - 5:00 PM

Pre-Conference Institute (Full Day)

Details

Full-day pre-conference institutes will take place on Wednesday, January 17 from 9:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.

Pre-registration is required for all Pre-Conference Workshops.

Orchestrating Drug/Alcohol Misuse Prevention Efforts: Tough Love for Meaningful Strategies

Presenters: David Anderson, Professor Emeritus of Education and Human Development at George Mason University; Rich Lucey, Senior Prevention Program Manager, Drug Enforcement Administration; Katrin Wesner-Harts, Director, Student Health Center, University of North Carolina-Wilmington; Kelly Truesdell, Assistant Director of The Fontaine Center, University of Georgia; Allison Smith, Assistant Commissioner for Student Health and Wellness, Louisiana Board of Regents; Shawnte Elbert, Chief Health Equity Officer, Walden University.

Drug and alcohol misuse permeate campus environments and affect students’ success, mental health, and quality of life. To make a substantive difference, leaders must demonstrate strong will and dedicated commitment to orchestrate grounded, evidence-informed, locally appropriate, and comprehensive approaches. Strategic planning, prevention science, persuasion skills and a clear vision combine to result in quality prevention efforts and positive change. This session is appropriate for campus and organization leaders seeking to embrace results.

 

Intersections Between the Clery Act and Title IX

Presenters: Laura Egan, Senior Director of Programs, Clery Center for Security on Campus; Keisha Coleman, Assistant Director of Programs, Clery Center for Security On Campus.

The Clery Act and Title IX have distinct influence over campus safety policies and procedures, particularly for instances of dating violence, domestic violence, sexual assault, and stalking (DVSAS). However, it can be difficult to recognize how these two laws work together when many lack a foundational understanding of the Clery Act itself. We will review the requirements of the Clery Act and its intersections with Title IX and will skill-build on the creation of complete policies and procedures that meet the requirements of both laws.

Liberating Traditional Substance Misuse Prevention Structures to Better Align with the Values and Experiences of Today's Students

Presenters: Kimberly Timpf, Education Strategy Lead, Vector Solutions; Dyan Jenkins-Ali, Chief of Staff for the Chief Health officer, Office of the President, Associate Director, VOICES UHR- Strategy and Planning, and Adjunct Faculty, School of Public Health, University of Michigan.

Innovating to address substance misuse will require challenging the status quo, specifically, whether our students are best served by strategies proven effective nearly three decades and a generation ago. This hands-on workshop will examine these programs within in the context of generational values around safety, wellbeing, and inclusion, while providing attendees with an opportunity to build the skills needed to liberate our thinking around traditional prevention approaches in order to better meet the diverse needs of today’s students.

9:00 AM - 12:00 PM

Pre-Conference Session (Half Day)

Details

Morning Half-day pre-conference sessions will take place on Wednesday, January 17 from 9:00 a.m. - 12:00 p.m.

Pre-registration is required for all Pre-Conference Workshops.

Certified Peer Educator (CPE) Train-the-Trainer

Presenters: Warren Martin, NASPA

NASPA’s Certified Peer Educator (CPE) training is a fantastic training opportunity for your students that will provide a foundation for understanding the role of a peer educator and the way to effectively and successfully create change on campus and in their community. Campus staff members that work with peer educators can become CPE Trainers, enabling them to facilitate the CPE curriculum to their students, leading them through the training, and certifying them as Certified Peer Educators. For more information visit the CPE train-the-trainer website by clicking here

Implementing Lasting Change: Navigating Buy-In and Managing Up for Impactful College Alcohol Prevention

Presenters: Jason Kilmer, Associate Professor of Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences, University of Washington; Brian Dietz, Associate Dean of Students, Kalamazoo College; Jennifer Jacobsen, Executive Director, Health & Wellness, Macalester College; Joan Masters, Project Director, Partners in Prevention, University of Missouri-Columbia.

This dynamic session explores the pivotal link between alcohol prevention, student well-being and institutional success. Through compelling case studies, from the initial launch of 360 Proof, gain insights into successfully fostering buy-in across campus, including senior leadership, for robust alcohol prevention programs. Uncover the keys to fostering student success while leaving with practical tools for initiating transformative change. Don't miss the chance to elevate your campus impact and drive meaningful results. This session is sponsored by 360 Proof – to learn more click here

The Life of an AVP of Health and Wellbeing: Essential Leadership Strategies and Skills

Presenters: James Raper, Associate Vice President for Health, Well-Being, Access, and Prevention. Emory University; Robert Ernst, Associate Vice President of Student Life for Health and Wellness, University of Michigan; Sherrá Watkins, Associate Vice President for Student Health & Wellness, University of Utah; Chris Dawe, AVP, Health & Well-Being, University of Houston; Elizabeth Cracco, Assistant Vice Chancellor of Campus Life and Wellbeing, University of Massachusetts Amherst.

Moving from experience as a Director to an AVP/C role means you are no longer the chief content expert. This preconference will use the experiences of five seasoned AVPs of health and wellbeing to facilitate discussions focused on critical leadership skills, challenges and opportunities within this unique portfolio, and strategies for engaging campus communities to advance wellbeing. Participants will reflect on their own existing leadership skills and strengths as well as opportunities for growth and develop a plan to address them.

2:00 PM - 5:00 PM

Pre-Conference Session (Half Day)

Details

Aftrernoon Half-day pre-conference sessions will take place on Wednesday, January 17 from 2:00 p.m. - 5:00 p.m.

Pre-registration is required for all Pre-Conference Workshops.

Capacity Building Without Burnout: Creating A Personalized Well-being Experience

Presenters: Shawnte Elbert, Chief Health Equity Officer, Walden University; Sherra Watkins, Associate Vice President for Health and Wellness, University of Utah

The current landscape of mental health support in educational settings reveals disparities in access, equity, and inclusivity, hindering diverse and holistic prevention and interventions. This lack of comprehensive support undermines overall student well-being and threatens academic success. This presenter will highlight the pressing need for a transformative approach that addresses mental health equity and fosters a culture of inclusive, personalized, and effective interventions via real-world case studies, presentation, and small groups.

Create Programming that Works: Leveraging User-Centered Design to Drive Impact for Student Well-Being

Presenters: Monica Keele, Manager of Substance Misuse Prevention and Assessment, Colorado State University; Mia Trentadue, Senior Partner Success Manager - YOU at College.

Developing innovative and impactful student programming is both a joy and challenge of our work. This session will explore the steps and processes of user-centered design to co-create meaningful programming based on students’ wants and needs. This interactive pre-conference session will enable participants to apply this framework to create and evaluate programs that work for their campus - now and in the future.

Empowering Advisors: Strategies, Resources, and Best Practices for Peer Education

This session will be presented by the Peer Education Faculty, for more information click here. 

The NASPA Peer Education Faculty looks to empower advisors to promote effective peer education, fostering enriched campus environments. This collaborative session will deepen collegiate peer health education advisors' understanding of the complex needs of diverse learners and will explore implementation approaches and best practices. Participants will learn from experts and from peers, develop their professional networks, gain access to resources and skills, and bring back new strategies and solutions to their campuses.

Health Promoting Universities: The Basics

Presenters: Sislena Ledbetter, Executive Director, Health and Wellness, Western Washington University; Jay Darr, Associate Dean, Student Wellness, University of Pittsburgh–Pittsburgh Campus; Kathleen Hatch, Associate Vice President, Kansas State University; M. Dolores Cimini, Director, Center for Behavioral Health Promotion and Applied Research, University at Albany; Charnequa Kennedy, Director, Counseling Services, North Carolina Central University

This session provides an overview of the Okanagan Charter and its key principles for action set forth by the International Health Promoting University and Colleges Network and supported by the US Health Promoting Campus Network. Participants will learn the basic elements of what it means to be a health promoting university and how to work toward a whole campus, settings and systems approach to promote wellbeing in person, place and planet.

Sustainably Engaging Faculty in Supporting Student Well-Being

Presenters: Jennifer Jacobsen, Executive Director, Health & Wellness, Macalester College; Andrea Tracy, Associate Dean for Student Academic Life, Grinnell College.

Faculty are essential partners in supporting student well-being; collaboration can be challenging for a variety of reasons. In this interactive session, presenters will offer opportunities for participants to discover and discuss strategies for student affairs professionals to engage faculty colleagues in three different contexts: (1) faculty-led work in curricular/academic settings (2) initiatives and activities primarily led by student affairs professionals and (3) in domains where faculty and student affairs roles significantly overlap.

7:00 AM - 5:00 PM

Registration

7:30 AM - 9:50 AM

Exhibit Hall Open

8:30 AM - 9:30 AM

First Time Attendee Conference Orientation

Details

As a first-time attendee of the NASPA Strategies Conference, get excited to experience unparalleled education to help you dive into a variety of topics focused on improving student and campus well-being. Join us for this session to learn about the various educational sessions, exhibits, and networking opportunities at this year’s event and how to navigate the conference. You will also learn about ways that NASPA can enhance your personal and professional growth as a higher education professional both during and after the event. Come prepared with questions you may have, so we may answer them and provide additional guidance for you to maximize your time at this year's conference.

 

9:00 AM - 9:30 AM

Peer Educator Orientation: Student Orientation Session

Details

Students are invited to join this orientation session tailored for Peer Educators at this year's conference. The Peer Education Conference promises a unique journey filled with educational sessions, renowned speakers, and opportunities to connect with fellow Peer Educators, fostering a lasting network. Come prepared to actively shape your conference experience: bring your questions, enthusiasm, and curiosity. Leave with the tools to make the most of every moment at the Peer Education Conference. Don't miss this opportunity—see you there!

10:00 AM - 11:30 AM

Opening Session & Keynote Speaker

Details

Opening Keynote

Understanding Intergenerational Cultural Scripts to Unlock Our Power

Stacey Diane A. Litam PhD., LPCCs, NCC, CMHC

The intergenerational cultural scripts we inherit have the power to hinder or help us. Join Stacey Diane A. Litam as she shares how she leveraged her family’s intergenerational stories and cultural scripts in ways that unlocked her power. Kicking off the conference, Stacey will lead us in exploring the transformative power of leveraging intergenerational stories, unlocking personal strengths, and letting go of unhelpful cultural scripts from a decolonized perspective.

 

 

 

 

11:30 AM - 1:00 PM

Conference Break & Working Lunch Meetings

Enjoy a conference break and lunch on your own or with colleagues. 

11:30 AM - 1:00 PM

Exhibit Hall Open

1:15 PM - 2:15 PM

Breakout Sessions

2:45 PM - 3:45 PM

Breakout Sessions

3:45 PM - 4:15 PM

Coffee with Exhibitors

4:30 PM - 5:30 PM

Breakout Sessions

5:30 PM - 7:00 PM

Opening Reception & Poster Sessions

Please join our poster session presenters for networking and continued learning. Heavy appetizers will be served.

5:30 PM - 7:00 PM

Peer Education Reception & Awards Ceremony

Celebrate excellence in peer education at the Peer Education Reception & Awards Ceremony. Join us for a captivating evening featuring engaging networking and the acknowledgment of outstanding contributions to Peer Education. 

7:00 AM - 5:00 PM

Registration

7:30 AM - 8:20 AM

Coffee and Breakfast in Exhibit Hall

7:30 AM - 8:20 AM

Exhibit Hall Open

8:30 AM - 10:00 AM

Plenary Speakers/Extended Breakout Session 1

Details

Plenary Speaker

Associations Between Substance Use & Mental Health: Prevention Opportunities and the Power of Peers

Jason R. Kilmer, Ph.D.

In this plenary presentation, Jason R. Kilmer, Ph.D. will present considerations of alcohol-related risk factors for suicide, including ways in which alcohol use can impact decision making when a person is experiencing distress.   Jason R. Kilmer, Ph.D. will review the recent literature on cannabis, focusing on mental health concerns associated with the use of high-potency cannabis, as well as associations between cannabis use disorder and suicide risk.  Implications for prevention, intervention, and public health will be discussed, with a focus on the important role that peers can play as partners in prevention.

10:30 AM - 11:30 AM

Breakout Sessions

11:30 AM - 1:30 PM

Conference Break

Enjoy a conference break on your own or with colleagues. 

11:30 AM - 1:45 PM

Exhibit Hall Open

1:45 PM - 3:15 PM

Plenary Speakers/Extended Breakout Session 2

Details

Plenary Speaker

 

Making Sexual Wellness Whole

Lexx Brown-James, LMFT, CSE, CSES 

Self-Sacrifice never equals goodness. Join Lexx Brown-James as she delivers a dynamic perspective that rebukes the idea of pouring from a full cup in care for others. During this conversation, Lexx Brown-James provides key strategies to fill your cup so that you can pour from the overflow. By reframing sexuality,Lexx Brown-James educates students and professionals about sexuality being a whole person concept to help create wellness across the spectrum of sexuality. Her goal is to educate others to preserve self-care and provide care for others.

3:15 PM - 3:45 PM

Afternoon Break with Exhibitors

4:00 PM - 5:00 PM

Breakout Sessions

5:30 PM - 7:30 PM

Optional Evening Receptions

Details

Please join your colleagues Friday from 5:30-7:30pm for an opportunity to connect and socialize within topic specific receptions. If you do not see a reception listed below, and would like to host one, please email [email protected] by December 1, 2023.

LOCATION RECEPTION DESCRIPTION
Grand Ballroom A AVP's & Aspiring AVP's Networking Reception For AVPs and aspiring AVPs, drop in to connect and and learn about the differences across AVP portfolios as well as the different trajectories to becoming an AVP.
Continential Ballroom 5 Health & Wellbeing Professionals of Color Reception An opportunity to connect, fellowship and network, while creating community. Let's laugh, learn and grow together.
Continential Ballroom 4 LGBTQ+ Social & Networking Reception Meet other LGBTQ+ conference professionals. The focus of the meeting is to have a safe and inclusive space for colleagues and peers to meet, network, and connect in a social space.
Continential Ballroom 3 Peer Educator Advisors Reception NASPA's Peer Education Initiatives welcome Peer Education Advisors and other Professionals who work within Peer Education to make new connections and grow their network, discuss programs and practices, and learn more about the field of Peer Education.
Continential Ballroom 6 Wellness & Health Promotion Knowledge Community Reception

Members and non-members alike are welcomed to joing the Wellness and Health Promotion Knowledge Community (WHPKC) to meet the Leadership Team, network, and learn how to be engaged and involved with the knowledge community.

East Lounge Take My Show On Your Road: Program Showcase

Stop by this interactive showcase to engage with a range on institutions who are shraing their programs, collaborations, and other evidence-based interventions - ideally walking away with an idea to implement on your campus. 

7:00 AM - 2:00 PM

Registration

7:30 AM - 8:20 AM

Coffee and Breakfast in Exhibit Hall

8:30 AM - 9:30 AM

Breakout Sessions

10:00 AM - 11:00 AM

Breakout Sessions

11:30 AM - 12:30 PM

Closing Session

Details

Closing Keynote

Centering the Sacred: Collective Healing in Higher Education

Mamta Motwani Accapadi, Ph.D. 

How would our society be transformed if colleges and universities became hubs for healing? Our students come to our campuses carrying the burdens and traumas of their current life circumstances, and for the next decade they also carry the collective trauma imprint of the COVID pandemic. Our students bring to us the identity-based trauma they have experienced personally, and intergenerationally. Yes - amidst all of this heaviness- they still choose to hope for a better future by seeking out higher education. What would it look like for us to recognize the ancestral hope and cultural wisdom that brought them to our doorsteps? In this vulnerable conversation, Mamta invites you to center the sacredness of ourselves and our students while imagining a higher education experience that centers collective healing worthy of our students' hopes and dreams.

1:00 PM - 5:00 PM

Optional Post-Conference Meetings

Featured Speakers

Continuing Education

Please note: The deadline to request continuing education credits for the 2024 NASPA Strategies Conferences is February 26, 2024. Requests for continuing education credits cannot be fulfilled after this date. 

The 2024 NASPA Strategies Conferences will seek to offer continuing education credits for APA, CHES/MCHES, CSAEd, NASW, and NBCC. NASPA is approved to be a continuing education provider for CSAEd, NBCC, NCHEC, and will submit for approval from NASW. NASPA is approved to offer APA credit through a partnership with the Association of University College Counseling Center Directors. NASPA will also able to provide a general certificate of attendance to document hours for other licenses or credentials not listed above.

The total number of hours that will be available for this conference will depend upon the eligibility of individual sessions, as well as the overall conference schedule. In the past, continuing education credits have been available during every breakout session block for the entirety of the conference. The full schedule and continuing education qualifications will be available in January 2024. For more information about each continuing education credit and offerings, please read through the descriptions below. Credit may be requested by completing the appropriate online form for the type of continuing education needed (APA, CHES/MCHES, NASW, NBCC; or CSAEd).

If you have questions about Continuing Education, please contact NASPA Staff at [email protected].

Continuing Education for Psychologists (APA)

NASPA thanks the Association for University and College Counseling Center Directors for sponsoring this continuing education opportunity for psychologists. The Association for University and College Counseling Center Directors (AUCCCD) is approved by the American Psychological Association to sponsor continuing education for psychologists. AUCCCD maintains responsibility for this program and its contents. Not all sessions are available for continuing education (CE) credit. Sessions which are eligible for APA credit will be identified within the program book and conference platform. 

To receive APA credit, participants must submit a form online and are encouraged to submit an evaluation following the event. A link to the online form can be found here and a PDF certificate will be sent via email after the form has been processed and approved.

National Association of Social Workers (NASW)

This program is approved by the National Association of Social Workers (Approval #886679822-4747) for 19 continuing education contact hours (including pre-conference workshops)

To receive NASW credit, complete the online form linked hereIn addition, attendees must complete an online evaluation of individual sessions, which will be emailed to you shortly after the conference. A PDF certificate will be sent via email after the form has been processed and approved.

National Board for Certified Counselors (NBCC)

NASPA will apply for approval from NBCC to be an Approved Continuing Education Provider. Programs that do not qualify for NBCC credit will be clearly identified. NASPA is solely responsible for all aspects of the programs.  

To receive NBCC credit, complete the online form linked hereIn addition, attendees must complete an online evaluation of individual sessions, which will be emailed to you shortly after the conference and a PDF certificate will be sent via email after the form has been processed and approved.

National Commission for Health Education Credentialing, Inc. (NCHEC)

NASPA is a designated provider of continuing education contact hours (CECH) in health education by the National Commission for Health Education Credentialing, Inc. This program is designated for Certified Health Education Specialists (CHES) and/or Master Certified Health Education Specialists (MCHES) to receive Category 1 continuing education contact hours. Poster sessions are not approved for CHES/MCHES contact hours.

To receive CHES or MCHES credit, To receive NBCC credit, complete the online form linked hereIn addition, attendees must complete an online evaluation of individual sessions, which will be emailed to you shortly after the conference. A PDF certificate will be sent via email after the form has been processed and approved, and individual hours will be reported to NCHEC in April 2024.

Student Affairs Educator Certification (CSAEd)

NASPA has been approved by the Higher Education Consortium for Student Affairs Certification to provide CE credit for Certified Student Affairs Educators (CSAEd™). Programs that qualify for CE credit in this program are clearly identified. NASPA is solely responsible for all aspects of this program.

Venue

Copley Place
Boston Copley Place 
Boston, Massachusetts 

All conference activities will take place within the Boston Copley Place, at both the Boston Marriott Copley Place and the Westin Copley Place

 
Hotel Room Rate / Night

Boston Marriott Copley Place

110 Huntington Avenue

Boston, MA 02116

*More information to come soon.  

The Westin Copley Place

10 Huntington Avenue

Boston, MA, 02116

*More information to come soon.  

Travel

The Hilton San Francisco Union Square hotel is serviced by San Francisco International Airport (SFO) or Oakland International Airport (OAK). The hotel is approximatley 13.6 miles north of the the SFO airport or 19.5 miles west of the OAK airport. Visit the SFO Airport website or the OAK Airport website for more information.  

This hotel does not provide shuttle service. An estimated Ride Share will cost $45 - $55 USD (one way)

Bay Area Rapid Transit (BART)

The BART is a heavy-rail public transit system that can provide service to both SFO and OAK. 

From SFO, take the Yellow Line north to the Powell Street station. Estimated cost is $10 USD (one way)

From OAK, take the Beige Line north to the Coliseum station. From there, take the Blue Line south the Powel Street station. Estimated cost of $12.

To learn more about the BART and to purchase tickets, visit their website here.

Parking

Self-parking, fee: $74.10 USD per car / per night

Valet parking, fee: $85.50 USD per car / per night

Hotel Guest Parking rates are inclusive of taxes.

Weather

The average temperatures in Boston, MA are around 37 degrees F during the day and 22 degrees F in the evening. As the conference gets closer, please visit the Weather Channel for more information.

Please note, the hotel and meeting area temperatures vary. Laywering with a sweater or jacket is recommended.

Engagement Opportunities

If you're interested in hosting a gathering or meeting at the 2024 NASPA Strategies Conferences, please complete the Meeting/Reception Request Form that is within the Call For Proposals. Once starting a new submission, you'll select 'Meeting/Reception" from the drop down menu and go from there. If you have any questions, please contact [email protected]

Submit Your Request Today!  

Looking to engage with others throughout the year? Be sure to visit the Knowledge Communities associated with this event.

Conferences Planning Committees

The NASPA Strategies Conferences would not be possible without the leadership, expertise and time of our volunteers who serve on the planning committees. They bring a wealth of knowledge and experience to the table in order to craft a comprehensive and intentional experience for all atttendees. 

If you are interested in crafting a vision for the 2025 NASPA Strategies Confrences, submit your interest by clicking here. 

Alcohol, Other Drug, and Campus Violence Prevention Planning Committee
  • Elizabeth Peeler, Co-Chair, Emory University
  • Dr. Sherra' Watkins, Co-Chair, University of Utah
  • Haley Mangette, Kalamazoo College
  • Jaclyn Webber, Towson University
  • Joshua Robinson, Jacksonville State University
  • Kimberly O'Brien, Trinity College
  • Melissa Febbroriello, Columbia State Community College
  • Olivia Case, State University of New York at Buffalo
  • Rich Lucey, Drug Enforcement Administration
  • Stephanie Guarino Lynch, San Diego State University
Mental Health Planning Committee
  • Noorjean Hassam, Co-Chair, University of British Columbia
  • Teniesea Russell, Co-Chair, Boston College
  • Beth Lohman, Butler University
  • Cassidy Gallegos, Boston College
  • Connelly Clifford, Merrimack College
  • Elijah Heslop, Butler University
  • Katherine Snyder, Denison University
  • Llani Main, Metropolitan Community College-Omaha
  • Mark Gronski, Methodist University
  • Meghan Dimsa, University of Denver
  • Phil Hughes, Bowling Green State University
  • Shanice White, Jackson State University
Sexual Violence Prevention and Response Planning Committee
  • Lynne Cornelius, Co-chair, Drake University
  • Tameika McCoy, Co-chair, Virginia Commonwealth University
  • Anna McGee, Ball State University
  • Ansley Romero, UNC Charlotte
  • Chynna Lewis, University of Wisconsin - Madison
  • Em Alves, National Organization for Victim Assistance
  • Jamie Greenwolf, John Carroll University
  • Jillian Kelley, The College of the Holy Cross
  • Jules Grable, Butler University
  • Julie Millisky, University of Pennsylvania
  • Stephanie Foran, Kansas State University
Well-being and Health Promotion Leadership Planning Committee
  • Ashley Hinton, Co-chair, Centre College
  • Oliver Tacto, Co-chair, Washington University in St. Louis
  • Alexis Washington, University of Texas at Arlington
  • Andrea L. Kimura, University of Missouri
  • Emily Pagano, University of Connecticut
  • Gabriela Ortiz, Universidad Tecmilenio
  • James Raper, Emory University
  • Joanna Royce Davis, Pacific Lutheran University
  • Nikki Denise Baker, University of Tennessee Knoxville
  • Re’Nesha Weston, The Ohio State University
  • Rose Rezaei, Florida State University
Peer Education Planning Committee
  • Noah Riley, Co-chair, Carnegie Mellon University
  • Ryan Anderson, Co-chair, Indiana University Purdue University – Indianapolis
  • Anthony Ciliberto, Villanova University
  • Jacob Murphy, Oklahoma State University Institute of Technology
  • Katryna Sardis, University of Missouri-Columbia
  • Meghan Factor-Page, Kent State University
  • Molly Dunn, University of South Carolina
  • Roger Perkey, The Ohio State University
  • Santee Ezell, Mississippi State University
  • Tyisha Terry, UNC Charlotte
  • Viviane Linos, Indiana University - Indianapolis

Call for Proposals

The 2024 NASPA Strategies Conferences planning committees invite program proposals from higher education professionals who are part of the essential systems addressing college student safety, health, and well-being. These functions are irreplaceable components of an environment conducive to learning and development, and the field of student affairs prevention professionals passionately dedicated to this work need your expertise. We welcome you to submit a program for this dynamic series of conferences and join us in January to optimize your own programs and services in the company of the largest student affairs health and wellness event in the field.

The conference planning committees encourage program proposals regarding proven practices with content that algin with conference themes and learning outcomes below, engage participants in fruitful discussions and provide meaningful content to bring back to their campuses.

Please note: all presenters must register to attend the 2024 NASPA Strategies Conferences in-person. There will not be any virtual presentation opportunities.

 

Submission Due Dates

  • Pre-conference Workshop Submission Deadline: August 15, 2023 
  • Main Program Submission Deadline: September 19, 2023 
  • Meeting/Reception Request Deadline: October 13, 2023 

CALL FOR PROGRAMS IS NOW CLOSED!

ACCEPTED SESSIONS WILL RECEIVE A REGISTRATION DISCOUNT FOR ALL PRESENTERS.

View Your Submitted Proposals Here! 

 

Additional Information

Types of Sessions Offered:

Types of sessions available to deliver your proposal content:

Successful Proposals:

Program reviewers rely on a well-written description to enhance their understanding of the content and goals of the presentation. The conference planning committees encourage program proposals with proven practices and content that will engage participants in fruitful discussions and provide meaningful content to bring back to their campuses.

Successful proposals should include: 

  • Lengthy description about session content that you will present.
  • Relationship of the program to the conference themes outlined below in 'Conference Themes & Learning Outcomes'
  • Identification of the program format (e.g., lecture, panel, debate) including methods for participant involvement (e.g., discussion, effective practice sharing, case study analysis).
  • Discussions of replicability: to what extent can the information presented in this program be replicated at other institutions?
  • Evidence of the conceptual foundation for proposal content including ways the program content is grounded in research, relevant experience, a cogent model, or appropriate theory.
    • Program proposals should establish a clear connection to the research, framework, model, or theory included in their discussions.
    • A list of references to relevant research, models, or theory must be listed in the "References" section. 

Tips:

  • Draft and save your work in a word processing program to ensure you keep a copy for your records. When you are ready, copy and paste the your description and outline into the text box below. 
  • There are no word limits on this section. Please provide enough details so that program reviewers can understand the breadth, depth, and scope of your program. This description will not be printed in the program book, website, or otherwise.
  • Ensure correct spelling and grammar.
General Proposal Writing Tips:

For additional tips, please visit NASPA’s Program Submission Guidelines: https://www.naspa.org/events/program-submission-guidelines.  

Conferences Themes & Learning Outcomes

Alcohol, Other Drug, and Campus Violence Prevention Conference

Campus or Community Coalitions and Partnerships

  • Understand the ways in which diverse stakeholders across the campus and the larger community can work collaboratively to address substance misuse or violence prevention and best serve the needs of campus community members
  • Analyze models of collaboration, case studies from integrated systems, successful partnerships, and efforts to engage all stakeholders in prevention efforts, including individual and environmental level strategies
  • Identify and evaluate health promotion efforts
  • Utilize evaluation data to build capacity, inform strategic planning, and promote community engagement

Current Trends and Emerging Issues in an Ever-Changing Environment

  • Analyze ongoing data and research surrounding substance misuse or campus violence prevention efforts, especially those addressing use patterns and implications for college students
  • Evaluate the scope of alcohol and other drug misuse on campus as well as its relationship to academic attainment, sense of belonging and retention 
  • Explore considerations for health equity on prevention efforts
  • Amplify the voices and experiences around substance misuse and campus violence of underrepresented populations
  • Identify best practices for campus, local, state or federal  policies surrounding alcohol and other drugs in the current socio political climate
  • Explore innovative solutions and best practices from other fields to identify areas of application

Evidence-Based and Evidence Informed Practices

  • Examine how evidence-based prevention strategies can be modified to fit varying institutions, communities, populations, and resource levels
  • Identify evidence-based and evidence informed programs and strategies
  • Explore replicable and adaptable evidence-based policies, programs, and practices
  • Evaluate the efficacy and fidelity of prevention strategies led through a variety of technical modalities 
  • Articulate how to support students who choose not to use substances and those in recovery communities, using innovative strategies, based on a foundational theory, model, or adaptation

The Strategic Prevention Framework 

  • Use local data to assess drug misuse and related problems; risk and protective factors, and capacity for prevention
  • Build capacity (i.e., resources and readiness) to take action to address prevention priorities
  • Plan how to best address identified prevention needs and associated factors, ensuring it is designed to meet the specific needs of the campus and/or surrounding
  • Implement evidence-based and evidence-informed programs and strategies according to a strategically developed prevention plan
  • Evaluate the processes and outcomes of the prevention interventions to reduce uncertainty, improve effectiveness, and make decisions
  • Address issues around cultural competency and cultural humility and their importance in prevention efforts
  • Build sustainability into all efforts in the spectrum of prevention and health promotion to maintain desired long-term results

 

Mental Health Conference

Creating Capacity

  • Explore new and innovative service models to address growing client waiting lists, increased demand, and limited or reduced provider capacity.
  • Identify  challenges, successes, and lessons learned in addressing administrative, financial, and other  barriers to student access to mental health services.
  • Explore effective strategies to promote help-seeking and referral to mental health services.
  • Explore innovative strategies to promote equitable access and inclusion in mental health service delivery across the prevention and intervention spectrum.
  • Identify new and innovative strategies to promote increased awareness of and access to mental health services for students.
  • Identify the unique challenges to recruiting and retaining mental health staff on college campuses.
  • Develop strategies to enhance retention and recruitment of mental health staff on college campuses.

Cross-Campus Collaboration and Coordination

  • Highlight successful interdisciplinary and interdepartmental collaboration models.
  • Explore models of successful collaborations with local, state, and national organizations aimed to promote mental health on campus.
  • Identify keys to successful cross-campus collaboration in the delivery of mental health services.
  • Explore how mental health intersects with violence prevention and response,  substance use, and collegiate recovery efforts on campus.
  • Identify and explore the intersections among the multiple and very complex roles assumed by mental health professionals, including clinical, advocacy, administrative, and other roles.

Diversity, Equity, Inclusion, and Belonging

  • Identify barriers to mental health and well-being among traditionally underserved and historically marginalized populations and strategies to address social justice and identity-related stress.
  • Highlight models supporting the provision of inclusive services, as well as the recruitment, hiring, and retention of diverse staff members to respond to current and emerging student needs.
  • Discuss the strategic, ethical, and practical aspects of diversity, equity, and inclusion on the delivery of mental health services and the promotion of a healthy environment for all members of the campus community.
  • Explore the mental health needs of students representing individual and cultural diversity and best practices to respond to these needs within the contextual framework of power and privilege.

Current Trends and Emerging Issues

  • Highlight innovative and effective programming across the public health spectrum focused on supporting and enhancing student mental health.
  • Examine current national trends and socio-political  issues and their relationship to the provision of mental health services on campus (e.g., abortion support access, transgender healthcare).
  • Identify effective treatment strategies to address depression, anxiety, post-traumatic stress, substance misuse, risk for suicide, and other mental health concerns experienced by college students.
  • Explore professional and ethical considerations in the delivery of mental health services.
  • Explore new and innovative strategies to support the engagement of students, faculty, staff members, and administrators on campus.
  • Examine institutional and other potential barriers and solutions to providing increased mental health services on campus.
  • Identify strategies to effectively communicate the need for increased resources to the institution.
  • Discuss strategies to address and overcome institutional barriers.
  • Explore strategies to address basic needs scarcity with college students (i.e., housing, food, transportation).
  • Analyze the complex interplay between social, environmental, and individual factors that contribute to the mental health consequences of gun violence.

Successful and Innovative Solutions

  • Explore innovative and effective strategies that are relevant and responsive to a range of target populations, including first-year students, student-athletes, veterans, international students, first-year students, students with families, students from equity deserving groups, and other groups.
  • Highlight  innovative and effective programming across the public health spectrum focused on supporting and enhancing student mental health.
  • Explore new and innovative strategies, programs, and policies to promote student resilience, connection, and belonging.
  • Identify strategies and practices that reimagine the intersection of resilience among mental health professionals during an endemic (e.g.., COVID, social justice, opioid, mental health).
  • Explore strategies for campus stakeholder collaboration aimed at developing unified and actionable mental health and wellbeing goals and messaging.
Peer Education Conference

Individual Skill Building and Leadership Development

  • Develop individual hard and/or soft skills that will enhance an individual's capacity in their role as a peer educator and/or advisor.
  • Learn specific topical content knowledge and current data that can inform programming and contribute to individual expertise. 
  • Reflect on different leadership styles and how that supports and enhances individual and group development.
  • Develop leadership, supervision and mentorship skills centering diversity, equity, and inclusion for peer educators and/or advisors.

Adaptable Solutions and Creative Approaches to Student Programming

  • Identify innovative and promising approaches for prevention, harm-reduction, and risk-reduction programming.
  • Articulate how to support students through engagement using innovative strategies.
  • Examine how successful programs or initiatives can be adapted to a variety of campus contexts.
  • Illustrate through case studies how peer education groups can build collaborative campus relationships to support students engaging in high-risk behaviors.
  • Utilize evaluation data to build capacity, inform programming and promote campus engagement.

Current Trends and Emerging Issues in an Ever-Changing Environment

  • Identify current and emerging issues impacting peer educators, groups, and/or advisors.
  • Discuss campus, community, and digital wellness trends that peer educators and/or advisors need to be aware of.
  • Highlight best practices that serve to amplify the voices and experiences of historically marginalized populations engaging in peer education work.
  • Identify changes and explore solutions in peer education group development, recruitment, retention due to societal, cultural, and political climate.

 for more information about the peer education confrence themes, click here

Sexual Violence Prevention and Response Conference

Personal, Professional, and Community Sustainability and Development

  • Consider the implications of secondary trauma and explore opportunities to increase professional well-being and implement interventions to help prevent employee burnout.
  • Explore strategies to establish personal and professional boundaries.
  • Build institutional capacity through navigating external funding and/or internal institutional priorities.
  • Develop cross-campus, local, state, and national relationships to build a network of creative and supportive professionals (advocates, prevention educators, etc.).
  • Identify models of collaborative partnerships with diversity, equity, and inclusion efforts to increase effectiveness of prevention, response, policy, and advocacy efforts.

Evidence-informed Policy and Practice

  • Identify evidence-informed approaches to power-based violence prevention and response.
  • Explore strategic use of assessment and data to inform and influence policies, programs, organization, infrastructure, and other higher order change that helps build a culture in which power-based violence is eliminated.
  • Discuss best practices in: implementing sustainable, evidence-informed prevention programs; improving campus response to violence and those who have survived acts of violence; and evaluating the impact of these efforts.
  • Review strategies for developing or revising comprehensive campus sexual misconduct policies, including how they are impacted by the latest federal and state legislative policy changes.
  • Identify gaps that exist within evidence-informed policy and practice and discuss ways to address them.

Innovative Approaches to Prevention and Response

  • Identify strategies, programs, and policies which are innovative and whose grounding in foundational theories, models, or frameworks make them promising in their efficacy.
  • Describe project implementation and program evaluation associated with the initiatives listed above.
  • Discuss innovative approaches to the prevention of and response to power-based violence in higher education, including discussions of lessons learned, assessment and evaluation, and replicability.
  • Explore restorative and transformative justice and community based accountability practices.
  • Identify strategies for introducing innovative approaches to prevention education.

Transforming Social Narratives

  • Examine and interrupt the problematic dominant narratives of power-based violence (e.g., racism, sexism, heteronormativity, gender identity, ableism, U.S.-centrism), including narratives around those who experience violence and those who perpetrate violence.
  • Describe the ways in which professionals who prevent and respond to violence participate in or shift dominant narratives (e.g., racism, sexism, heteronormativity, gender identity, ableism, U.S.-centrism) .
  • Propose new perspectives, approaches, and strategies to honor all identities in power-based violence work.
  • Identify practices that foster inclusive and equitable efforts to address power-based violence.
  • Examine how society develops sexual scripts around power-based violence and the impact of those scripts on youth. In the context of media, explore ways to increase media literacy and how this relates to the perpetuation of power-based violence.

Developing or Expanding Campus and Community Partnerships

  • Discuss the ways in which a diversity of stakeholders from within and across the campus and the larger community can work collaboratively to address power-based violence and best serve the needs of campus community members.
  • Describe models of collaboration, case studies from integrated systems, successful partnerships, and efforts to engage all stakeholders in power-based violence prevention and response.
  • Describe collaboration and identify strategies for working with local, state, and national organizations to prevent and respond to campus power-based violence.
  • Identify identity-specific resources within communities that specialize in serving marginalized communities.
Well-being and Health Promotion Leadership Conference

Engagement, Collaboration & Cross-functional Partnerships

  • Understand the importance of fostering engagement and collaboration for effective health promotion and well-being initiatives.
  • Develop skills and strategies to establish, develop, lead, and maintain cross-functional partnerships for collaborative impact in promoting health and well-being.
  • Learn effective communication and advocacy techniques to engage and mobilize stakeholders across different departments and disciplines.
  • Gain insights into leadership approaches that support and enhance engagement, collaboration, and cross-functional partnerships for long-term success in advancing health promotion and well-being.
  • Describe various models of partnership and collaboration advancing flourishing campuses
  • Leadership, capacity building, grow mid level professionals 

Health Disparities, Biases, and Systemic Inequities of Well-being

  • Develop a comprehensive understanding of the ways in which health disparities, biases, and systemic inequities manifest in underrepresented and marginalized populations and communities.
  • Analyze the impact of social determinants of health disparities and inequities in higher education settings, and explore strategies to address them through health promotion initiatives.
  • Discuss the ways in which power differentials operate, are experienced, and are reinforced in the health promotion process at individual, group, community, institutional, and global levels.
  • Explore innovative approaches and best practices for promoting health equity and well-being while reducing systemic inequities in diverse settings and communities.
  • Discuss how social, political, and historical movements have shaped health promotion strategies to intentionally address systems of power, privilege, and oppression in higher education settings.
  • Develop leadership strategies and advocacy skills to support a campus culture driven by diversity, equity, inclusion, and social justice.

Current Trends, Promising Practices, and Emerging Issues

  • Identify promising practices that are theoretically grounded, evidence-informed and/or interdisciplinary to improve campus well-being.
  • Compare and contrast mentorship, coaching, and organizational leadership models across institutions and their impact on well-being.
  • Promote innovative practices addressing the social determinants of health, including health equity and environmental justice.
  • Identify and share best practices that campuses have utilized, integrating new guidance, to create healthy and well communities.
  • Describe future trends in systemic well-being on university campuses.
  • Examine innovative programming in the field of health promotion.

Data, Policies, Laws, and Research to Advance Well-being

  • Discover how data is gathered, disaggregated, contextualized, shared and utilized by campus community members for health promotion.
  • Using data and research to tell stories of our campus communities to build champions, influence decisions, and develop resources.
  • Describe the complexity of data and its use in building a salutogenic narrative.
  • Identify institutional, local and national policy changes that are showing promise in their proposal or implementation stage.

Foundations and Essential Ecosystems for Health Promotion - Centering Well-being in Person, Place and Planet

  • Learn effective strategies for developing leadership qualities and promoting professional growth.
  • Apply foundational frameworks and principles for health promotion strategies in higher education.
  • Describe the progression of health promotion in higher education leading for a clear understanding of current industry standards.
  • Develop marketing and communication strategies to model effective health and well-being initiatives.
  • Discover ways to synergize sustainability, equity and health using a settings and systems approach.
  • Foster a viable infrastructure to impact system change and create a culture of well-being.
  • Explore how planetary health serves as a primary driver of well-being.

Sponsors

The 2024 NASPA Strategies Conferences are your opportunity to take a cross-functional approach to student success when it has never been more important.

The priority deadline was December 1, 2023. Applications are no longer being accepted, as the Exhibit Hall has reached capacity. Click here to view the 2024 offerings and pricing.

Please reach out to Fred Comparato, Senior Director of Corporate Development, at 614-204-5994 or [email protected] with any questions regarding exhibiting and sponsorship opportunities.

Thank You to our 2024 Sponsors!

Platinum Sponsors

Gold Sponsors

Silver Sponsors

Bronze Sponsors