2013-09-26

Administrative, Assessment, IT, Fundraising, Professional Development, and related Excellence Awards

Category Abstract

This award seeks to highlight innovative initiatives that relate to the programs, policies, procedures, best practices, or services provided by Administration, Assessment, IT, Fundraising, Professional Development, or related units. It is vital that the initiative nominated is related to the category and addresses a critical need.

The successful nomination will concisely explain the issue, how it relates to institutional or Student Affairs’ mission, and population addressed. Documentation and results of assessments should include student learning or success outcomes; how the program/service relates to a critical need, and its theoretical foundation.

Excellence Awards Overview

NASPA recognizes the contributions of members who are transforming higher education through outstanding programs, innovative services, and effective administration. All NASPA members are encouraged to enter recently developed and/or longstanding programs and initiatives for consideration for the NASPA Excellence Awards.

Programs selected for recognition in each category will receive one of three designations: Gold, Silver, or Bronze. The gold recipients from each category will be further judged for the designations of Grand Gold, Grand Silver, and Grand Bronze.

Submissions will be due by October 23, 2018. There is no specific time by which your submission must be made on October 23, 2018. Gold Award recipients will be recognized at the 2019 NASPA Annual Conference in Los Angeles, CA. 

If the submission relates to a program that relies on substantive use of multimedia technology, a link to those materials should be embedded in the award submission. The materials must be accessible to committee members without the need for user identification or password.

  • Judging Criteria

    Entries within each category will be reviewed by a cross-section of experienced NASPA members. Three to five judges will independently review submissions using the following criteria:

    • Impact on student learning and success demonstrated through transition, retention, or achievement outcomes
    • Relevance to institutional mission and/or applicability to student affairs profession institutionally, regionally, or nationally
    • Success in addressing student needs or responding to critical campus concerns and issues
    • Involvement, inclusion, and collaboration with academic affairs and other campus departments in planning and implementation
    • Use of innovative and creative methods, practices, or activities including the use of social media and emerging learning technologies
    • Application of available or emerging theoretical models, practical research, and program assessment


    In addition, submissions will also be assessed for the quality of the program description, explanation of concepts, and clarity of writing. Please see this link for the rubric which will be used for assessment.

  • Recognition

    Gold Award recipients will:

    • Be placed in consideration for the NASPA Grand Gold Medal, NASPA Grand Silver Medal and NASPA Grand Bronze Medal designating the top three programs or initiatives.
    • Receive NASPA Excellence Awards Certificates of Gold.
    • Be prominently displayed at the NASPA Annual Conference.
    • Be invited to participate in a poster session recognizing all Gold Award recipients during the NASPA Annual Conference.
    • Be showcased in a collection of Gold Award recipients on the NASPA Excellence Awards web resource center.
    • Receive letters of commendation sent by NASPA to the institution's president, chief student affairs officer, and selected local media to announce the achievement.


    Silver and Bronze Award recipients will:

    • Receive NASPA Excellence Awards Certificates of Silver or Bronze.
    • Be included in a collection of selected entries on the NASPA Excellence Awards web resource center.
    • Receive letters of commendation from NASPA to the institution's president and chief student affairs officer.


    Grand Medal recipients:

    • The Gold Award recipient in each category will be further considered for the highest awards for program excellence -- the NASPA Grand Gold Medal, the NASPA Grand Silver Medal and the NASPA Grand Bronze Medal. The recipients of these three grand awards will be recognized during the NASPA Annual Awards Luncheon.

Excellence Awards


Award Information

Nominations for the 2018-2019 NASPA Excellence Awards are now closed. Winners will be announced in January.

Nominations for the 2019-2020 NASPA Excellence Awards will open in spring 2019. 

Requirements

To be considered for a NASPA Excellence Award, you must submit the following information:

  • Correspond to one Excellence Award category
  • Program title
  • Executive summary (500 words or less)
  • Information around Student Learning and/or Success, Mission and/or Advancement of Student Affairs, Student and/or campus needs, Collaboration and Sustainability, Originality and creativity, and Application of Research, Theory, and Assessment
  • Letters of support (maximum of three)

Current Excellence Award Recipients

  • Grand Silver Winner
    Gold Winner
    Making the Most of 30,000 Conversations: The FSRC Model

    Bowling Green State University

    How do you make the most meaning out of 30,000 conversations? How do you hold staff accountable to have 30,000 intentional conversations? How do you identify concerns and trends based on those conversations? What impact have the 30,000 conversations had on student success and learning? These were problems faced by the Office of Residence Life at Bowling Green State University upon implementation of the Falcon Success and Retention Curriculum (FSRC). Through a collaborative partnership with colleagues in Academic Affairs, we found the solution. Ten years ago the Office of Residence Life observed a decline in attendance at traditional residential programming. Responding to this trend, our office initiated a community development model mixing traditional social programming and individual conversations. The model was booklet-driven with prompts for staff. Staff facilitated conversations, and documented responses in the booklet. In 2014, the model was completely revised. Social programming became the responsibility of the Hall Director. The primary focus of the Resident Advisor (RA) was to have intentional conversations with residents. This model was renamed the Falcon Success and Retention Curriculum. The model was grounded in student development theory. It was specifically built upon Astin’s Input-Environment-Output (IEO) theory (1991), and Tinto’s Interactionist Model (1975). Conversations and interventions revolve around learning outcomes built on Residence Life’s five priorities of Academic Success, Safety, Engagement, Inclusivity, and Personal Growth. Initially RAs documented conversations in Microsoft Excel. They noted student challenges and successes as identified with colleagues in Academic Affairs. The data was compiled manually at the hall and campus level. As the model developed so did the method for data collection. Two questions arose regarding the data. What do we do with it, and what could we do with it? Since fall of 2015 the Office of Residence Life has partnered with Academic Affairs to find a solution. We developed a data collection and analysis system using readily available software including Microsoft SharePoint, Access, Excel. We gave RAs the ability to enter data on mobile devices using PowerApps. Hall Directors and Central Office Staff in the Residence Life have real-time dashboards utilizing Access and Excel Pivot Tables to identify trends, patterns, and concerns. Follow-up notes regarding students at risk to leave the university are now uploaded and shared automatically with Academic Advisors through Student Success Collaborative Campus platform (SSC). The number of interactions a student has with their RA has also been identified as a key factor in the university’s predictive model of persistence and retention. In five semesters utilizing these technology solutions, we documented 146,226 interactions. This averages 29,245 interactions per semester, 172.61 interactions per RA, and 4.89 interactions per resident. In the ten years since the “Intentional Interaction” model was developed, we have leveraged readily available technology to assist with data collection and analysis, to manage staff accountability, and to identify trends and patterns with students. We formed strong partnerships with colleagues in Academic Affairs to increase student success and retention. In the same period, retention rates of first-year, residential students rose from 69% to 78%.


    View All Current Recipients
    Links
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  • Silver Winner
    HackNYU

    New York University

    In Fall 2013, New York University's Student Senators Council observed that an increasing number of students were uninspired by technology on campus and decided to be part of the solution. A defunct student Information Technology (IT) Advisory Committee was relaunched as the Student Technology and Research Committee (STARC) with an expanded and more robust mission: to promote the development of technology that is useful to students and to advise the University on student needs while exploring innovative ways to tackle University challenges with technological solutions. As STARC set out on its mission, they faced several administrative hurdles, leading them to seek input and guidance from the Division of Student Affairs. Through this partnership, a formal relationship was established between student government and NYU's IT division, prompting the launch of a University-wide student hackathon to imagine new technologies that could improve the student experience at NYU. The inaugural "Create A Better NYU" hackathon in Fall 2013 was an instant success, bringing together nearly 100 students and alumni who formed teams to improve student life on campus and beyond. The first hackathon demonstrated a critical campus need for students to work within existing University systems in order to build a better NYU. Consequently, an IT, STARC, and Student Affairs collaboration was born that encourages offices across the University to build and to grant access to their APIs and non-private data. For example, course information was provided by the Registrar so that students could conceive of new ways to schedule classes. HackNYU is an innovative engine for the University, bringing not only students' ideas but also their talents to the table to create new technologies that improve the student experience. Students know their day in and day out challenges better than administrators, so including them in the conversation—and allowing them the opportunity to create the solution—provides a phenomenal opportunity for students to learn about the complexities of organizational problems and dynamics, as well as a great testing ground for their ideas. By offering students a space to explore how they might solve University problems, HackNYU also provides a unique opportunity to foster a deeper sense of connection to their alma mater in the process of building their skills. Over five years, this collaboration has rapidly grown. The nascent hackathon that was first hosted in a student cafeteria has ballooned into HackNYU—one of the world's largest global hackathons. In Spring 2018, over 700 participants checked in for the opening night; of those, roughly 500 participated throughout the weekend. In all, there were 80 teams who submitted projects for judging.


    View All Current Recipients
    Links
    Learn More

Past Excellence Award Recipients

  • 2018
    Gold Winner
    Beyond The Classroom Matters® at the University of South Carolina


    University of South Carolina

    Learn More
  • 2018
    Silver Winner
    Assessment 101


    James Madison University

    Learn More
  • 2018
    Bronze Winner
    Student Professional IT Experience (SPRITE)


    Texas A&M University

    Learn More
  • 2012
    Gold Winner
    Reframing the Retention Conversation: Promoting Action and Success through a Cross-Divisional Symposium

    Jason Simon, Ph.D.
    University of North Texas

    Read Materials
  • 2012
    Silver Winner
    Assessment in Action: The Student Satisfaction Survey at Washington & Jefferson College

    Byron McCrae
    Washington & Jefferson College

    Read Materials
  • 2012
    Bronze Winner
    Student Organization System: An Online Student Organization Management System

    Allison Toney
    University of South Carolina

    Read Materials
  • 2010-11
    Gold Winner
    University of South Carolina's University 101 Program Instructor Development Process

    Mary Stuart Hunter
    University of South Carolina

    Read Materials
  • 2010-11
    Silver Winner
    The Week of Reflection at Stephen F. Austin State University

    Adam Peck
    Stephen F. Austin State University

    Read Materials
  • 2010-11
    Bronze Winner
    Reshaus Information System

    Fernando Sierra
    Tecnológico de Monterrey

    Read Materials
  • 2009
    Gold Winner
    The Early Alert Intervention Team

    Elizabeth Price
    Sinclair Community College

    Read Materials
  • 2009
    Silver Winner
    Administrators Cultural Training Institute (A.C.T. Institute)

    Erin Callihan
    New York University

    Read Materials
  • 2009
    Bronze Winner
    An Online Approach to Managing Student Demand: Implementing Queuing Theory in an Undergraduate Student Services Office

    Randall Brumfield
    University of Central Florida

    Read Materials
  • 2008
    Gold Winner
    Integral Formation: From our personnel to our students

    Humberto Muniz
    TECNOLOGICO DE MONTERREY

    Read Materials
  • 2008
    Silver Winner
    Student Leader Learning Outcomes Project

    Darby Roberts
    Texas A&M University

    Read Materials
  • 2008
    Bronze Winner
    Benchmarking and Quantitative Analysis: Report for the Student Affairs Committee of the Board of Trustees

    Sean Adams
    Mount Saint Mary's University

    Read Materials
  • 2007
    Gold Winner
    UNCG Cares: Creating a Culture of Care to Aid Students in Distress

    Jen Day Shaw
    University of North Carolina-Greensboro

    Learn More
  • 2007
    Silver Winner
    Women in the Know program

    Juliette Landphair
    Westhampton College

    Learn More
  • 2007
    Bronze Winner
    The University of Georgia Learning and Development Objectives Initiative

    Jan Barham
    University of Georgia

    Learn More
  • 2006
    Gold Winner
    UNT Student Money Management Center: A Center of Excellence

    Danielle Champagne
    University of North Texas

    Learn More
  • 2005
    Gold Winner
    Student Organization Assessment Center

    Darby Roberts
    Texas A&M University

    Learn More
  • 2005
    Silver Winner
    Curriculum Mapping: Alignment and Assessment in Student Affairs

    Nicole Boulais
    Rochester Institute of Technology

    Learn More
  • 2005
    Bronze Winner
    University of South Carolina Division of Student Affairs' Professional Development Program

    Dennis A. Pruitt
    University of South Carolina

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