Fraternity and Sorority

Fraternity and Sorority

The Fraternity and Sorority Knowledge Community (FSKC) provides a forum for organizations and professionals working with fraternities and sororities to discuss the ideas and issues that can advance the field.

Message from the Co-Chairs

Welcome to the NASPA Fraternity and Sorority Knowledge Community (FSKC). The purpose of our KC is to understand the impact fraternal organizations have on campus and educate NASPA professionals on issues, trends and best practices that help the organizations contribute to the missions of their universities. With more than 1400 members, the FSKC has the opportunity to have a significant impact on our campuses and within NASPA. We welcome your involvement.

Leadership Team

Knowledge Community leaders are NASPA volunteers who have generously devoted their time to their Knowledge Community. Chairs are elected by the Knowledge Community members while Regional representatives are selected from within the Region. Additional roles are selected by the Knowledge Community.

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Get Involved

Interested in getting involved with the FSKC? We’re always on the lookout from contributions from our members. The FSKC is involved in a number of ongoing and planned projects, including sponsored programs and meetings at the NASPA Annual Conference.

Resources

EDUCATIONAL RESOURCES

  • Campuspeak: Professional speaking agency representing many of the outstanding college campus speakers in the country.
  • Interfraternity Institute: Many campus fraternity and sorority advising professionals are graduates of IFI, an intensive summer training institute held in Bloomington, IN, and coordinated by Student Affairs staff at Indiana University and the Fraternity Executives Association. For more information, contact Dick McKaig at mckaig@indiana.edu.
  • Living the Ritual: National resource for Ritual education for fraternities and sororities. Site contains: Ritual Resources, Products, and Contact Us
  • National Center for Higher Education Risk Management: Organization dedicated to helping colleges and universities reduce liability and create safer learning environments. In particular, the organization offers services and publications related to sexual misconduct, sexual harassment, hazing, alcohol and other drugs, and campus security.
  • Stop the Hate: Campus hate crime prevention for colleges and universities. Site contains: Resources, Partners, Related Links, Volunteer Opps, and About Us.
  • StopHazing.org: Focused on educating to eliminate hazing, this site offers information on many aspects of hazing including fraternity, sorority, athletic, high school and military hazing. Check out the latest hazing books, find anti-hazing speakers, read the latest hazing news or look up some alternatives to hazing or get another viewpoint by reading some pro-hazing email. Site includes general information, hazing types, resources, activism options, and other information.
  • TIPS: The TIPS (Training for Intervention ProcedureS) program is designed to teach servers, sellers and consumers of alcohol to prevent intoxication, drunk driving and underage drinking. Site contains: TiPS Trainers, Organizations, TiPS Server/Students, Universities, Alcohol Research, etc.
  • NIC: The NIC serves to advocate the needs of its member fraternities through enrichment of the fraternity experience; advancement and growth of the fraternity community; and enhancement of the educational mission of the host institutions.

NORTH-AMERICAN INTERFRATERNITY CONFERENCE STANDARDS

 
NIC Standards for NIC Member Fraternities

Nothing in the North-American Interfraternity Conference Standards should be interpreted in any way as implying that an NIC member organization has a duty or an ability to supervise or control collegiate students or chapters associated with it. The NIC and its member organizations recognize that, by definition, its member organizations are based upon fraternal, not parental, relationships, and that the member organizations do not have the ability to monitor or control the activities of respective chapters, or collegiate students associated with a chapter.

 1. The following data, covering the preceding academic year, will be reported to the NIC headquarters by November 1st of each year:
  • Number of pledges/new members
  • Retention of pledges
  • Number of initiates*
  • Number of initiated men (undergraduate)*
  • Retention of men for past academic years (annual retention rate for those who left fraternity prior to graduation)
  • Number of chapters opened and size at time of chartering
  • Number of closed chapters and reason for closure
  • Number of active chapters*
  • Number of members involved in campus leadership positions
  • Number of community service hours donated
  • Number of dollars raised for charitable causes

Information collected will only be made public in a three tier aggregate of all NIC members. Raw data will be destroyed after aggregate data is compiled. 

*provided through normal course of member's financial audit notes

2. Member organization policies will include:
  • Member's chapters agree to and support open expansion on their respective campuses (implemented no later than September 1, 2004)
  • Member organizations are insured with liability coverage (implemented no later than September 1,  2005)
  • Each associate/pledge/new member has a minimum high school GPA of 2.3 for first semester freshman year and (whichever is appropriate per NIC member decision)
    • Minimum college GPA of 2.25 thereafter;
    • Or has a GPA at or above each campus all-men's average thereafter (implemented no later than September 1, 2005)
  • Annual cumulative GPA of (whichever is appropriate per NIC member decision)
    • At least a 2.5 for each chapter
    • Or at or above each campus all-men's average (implemented no later than September 1, 2005)
  • The associate/pledge/new member program shall last no longer than twelve weeks and encourages a program lasting less than twelve weeks. (Implemented no later than September 1, 2005)
  • Fraternity-chapter women's auxiliary groups (i.e. "little sisters") are not allowed (implemented no later than September 1, 2004)
  • Risk management policies that address alcohol use, fire safety, hazing, and sexual assault/abuse (implemented no later than September 1, 2004)
  • Alcohol free at all rush/recruitment activities including formal, informal and summer/break recruitment activities (implemented no later than September 1, 2004)
  • Alcohol free pledge/associate/new member programs (implemented no later than September 1, 2004)
  • Language allowing for immediate chapter emergency, temporary suspension by individual fraternity (implemented no later than September 1, 2004)

3. Each member will communicate its values through its ritual at least annually or as prescribed by its policies (implemented no later than September 1, 2004)
4. Each member organization will communicate the importance of its undergraduate members participating in educational programming (whether campus, national fraternity or independently led) covering any of the following: academic achievement, alcohol consumption, career preparation, civic engagement, hazing, leadership development, sexual assault, and values & ethics. (implemented by September 1, 2004)
NIC Standards for Campuses
Campus Expectations

Not only will the Standards documents set basic expectations for NIC members, the NIC anticipates the following from NIC member host campuses:

The following data:

  • Campus, all men's Greek system and chapter GPA by semester/quarter
  • Total number of men who pledged all chapters in an academic year
  • Total number of men who initiated all chapters in an academic year
  • Percentage of fraternity men compared to total number of all men on campus
  • Total number of chapters closed/opened in an academic year
  • Total number of Greek-life full-time professionals on each campus
  • Host institution will provide a leadership class for credit for all pledges/new members (and if desired by institution, other members in other campus organizations) each term
  • Open Expansion
    • No NIC member organization is prohibited from selecting undergraduates for the purpose of establishing a chapter on the campus of the host institution. The host institution's Interfraternity Council may not deter expansion by withholding membership of NIC group from IFC.
  • Open Recruitment
  • Host institution will support open recruitment and will not prohibit any male enrolled as a full time student in good standing from participating in   rush recruitment activities and joining an NIC member fraternity. Host institution will not prohibit NIC member fraternity from recruiting/rushing male students on campus.
  • Encourage faculty through incentives to become involved as faculty advisors to chapters
  • Provide individual chapter, Greek system and campus demographic information to chapters as requested.
  • rovide impartial judicial process with right of appeal
  • Work to reestablish a five-day academic week
  • Provide financial management, property and accounts collection support.


Campus-led programming designed to inhibit/prevent problem behaviors (for example, alcohol abuse or sexual assault) will not single out Greek organizations from other campus organizations for mandatory participation requirements.

CALL FOR VALUES CONGRUENCE

 
National Panhellenic Conference Standards

Believing that Greek organizations contribute in multiple ways to campus life and higher education, the leadership of the 26 inter/national women's fraternities that comprise the National Panhellenic Conference is proud of the positive contributions our groups make to their host institutions. We are committed to the continuation of our organizations at their house institutions. In an effort to reaffirm our high standards, the leadership of these 26 inter/national women's fraternities submit the following standards as minimum expectations of collegiate chapters of the National Panhellenic Conference groups.

Our chapters will enhance and promote each member's development and learning by:

1. Positively affecting intellectual development.

Each member group of the National Panhellenic Conference places high value on education, academic performance and intellectual development.

The following minimum standards for chapters are:

  • Meeting or exceeding the campus All Women's Average.
  • Providing academic programming to new members and members, co-sponsoring programming with another Greek and/or campus organization or attending campus-sponsored programming that may include but not be limited to teaching study skills, providing tutoring, and recognizing scholastic achievement.
  • Developing positive relationships with university faculty by seeking their assistance with the chapter's academic programming and scholarship goals.
2. Instilling the values of their organizations and their host institution.

Each member group of the National Panhellenic Conference:

  • Integrates their values, missions and standards throughout their collegiate chapter organizational and programming structure.
  • Educates their chapter members on policies pertaining to the issues of alcohol and substance abuse, underage drinking, and all inter/national policies pertaining to it.
  • Encourages non-alcohol-free facilities for all of their house chapters.
  • Requires a policy of alcohol-free facilities for all of their housed chapters.
  • Provides a standards board structure by which chapters hold their members accountable for their behavior.


The following minimum standards for chapters are:

  • Providing information on underage drinking and alcohol and substance abuse at least once a term.
  • Enforcing its inter/national organization's clear policies on alcohol and social planning guidelines/policies.
  • Abiding by all federal, state/province and local laws related to alcohol and substance use.
  • Providing at least one (1) values education program annually.
  • Partnering with the university to provide a healthy and safe collegiate experience for chapters that is grounded in the core values and mission of both the host institution and the inter/national organization.
3. Developing leadership skills and abilities. 

Each member group of the National Panhellenic Conference places high value on the development, support and mentoring of leaders.

  • Providing at least one (1) leadership development program annually, co-sponsoring a program with another Greek and/or campus organization or attending a campus-sponsored program.
  • Requiring at least one (1) chapter officer to attend the inter/national organization's annual Convention/Leadership Conference.
  • Encouraging chapter members to utilize their leadership skills for the benefit of other campus organizations, activities and/or projects.
  • Having at least one (1) local alumna serving as an advisor. In communities where local alumnae are not available to serve as advisors, a chapter shall rely on a faculty advisor. An advisor and chapter leaders shall periodically engage in dialogue with university officials.
4. Developing positive relationships (brotherhood/sisterhood) 

Each member group of the National Panhellenic Conference places high value on respect for others, human dignity, cultural diversity and self-worth.

The following minimum standards for chapters are:

  • Adhering to its inter/national policies regarding hazing.
  • Executing a new member program consistent with the inter/national organization's values that positively introduces new members to the Greek community.
  • Providing at least one (1) program annually on the value of human dignity, co-sponsoring a program with another Greek and/or campus organization or attending a campus-sponsored program.
  • Participating in at least one (1) campus-sponsored program annually that promotes the campus's multicultural climate.
  • Providing a minimum of one (1) health and wellness program annually, co-sponsoring a program with another Greek and/or campus organization or attending a campus-sponsored program.
5. Developing citizenship through service and outreach.

Each member group of the National Panhellenic Conference places high value on community and philanthropic service.

The following minimum standards for chapters are:

  • Engaging in a minimum of one (1) community service project of hands-on assistance each term.
  • Complying with the fire/safety inspection regulations (housed chapters) of its inter/national organization and host institution.
  • Acknowledging and promoting positive relationships with the greater university community by engaging in regular communication and dialogue that informs and solves problems when needed.
National Pan-Hellenic Council, Inc Standards
Shared Standards Draft
Statement of Purpose

The National Pan-Hellenic Council (NPHC) was established on May 10, 1930, on the campus of Howard University in Washington, D. C., with the purpose and mission of the organization being "unanimity of thought and action as far as possible in the conduct of Greek-letter collegiate fraternities and sororities, and to consider problems of mutual interest to its affiliate organizations." Early in 1937, the organization was incorporated under the laws of the State of Illinois and became known as the "National Pan-Hellenic Council, Incorporated."

In an effort to assist institutions of higher learning across the nation and abroad in understanding the beginnings and function of historically Black fraternities and sororities, and the standards governing these organizations, and in a further effort to continue to address issues of mutual concern, focusing on five essential and shared areas, to the NPHC and member organizations (Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Inc., Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, Inc., Delta Sigma Theta Sorority, Inc., Zeta Phi Beta Sorority, Inc., Iota Phi Theta Fraternity, Inc., Kappa Alpha Psi Fraternity, Inc., Sigma Gamma Rho Sorority, Inc., Phi Beta Sigma Fraternity, Inc., Omega Psi Phi Fraternity, Inc.), these standards have been drafted.

Expectations for NPHC Undergraduate Councils and Affiliate Chapters

1.  Continued promotion of academic excellence

  • Maintain grade point averages (GPAs) above the minimum GPA requirement to be an Active member of the chapter and organization as defined by the college or university, if standards are higher than said affiliate organization.
  • Maintain graduation rates equal to or which exceed the all men's or women's rates, respectively, on a given campus.Develop scholarship programs that challenge members and potential members to achieve academically, provide scholastic support, and recognize both improvement and excellence in academic performance.

2.   Demonstration of the values of NPHC, affiliate organizations, and host institutions

  • Integrate the stated values and mission of NPHC, affiliate organizations, and the institution into all aspects of the organization and membership.
  • Develop and implement a Standards Board to hold members accountable to the entire Greek-lettered community, as well as to the student code of conduct at the institution.
  • Sponsor monthly leadership programs which promote personal development and encourage implementation of best business practices.
  • Develop standards which discourage both the misuse of alcohol and the use of illegal drugs and which exact penalties.

3.  Development of leadership skills.

  • Provide members with opportunities for leadership development workshops and programs, through NPHC, affiliate organizations, and other programs sponsored by outside organizations.
  • Encourage affiliate chapter members to seek leadership roles in other campus organizations.

4.  Development of positive supportive relationships.

  • Comply with all hazing and mandated policies of the state, college/university, NPHC, and affiliate organizations.
  • Create programs that enhance the Greek-letter community and student body and thereby contribute to a positive relationship with the community at large.
  • Demonstrate a genuine concern for all mankind.
  • Seek an appropriately credentialed Graduate chapter and Faculty/Staff advisor(s) to serve as advisories to affiliate chapters and the local NPHC

5. Develop citizenship through community service and outreach.

  • Develop effective service projects and community outreach programs on an on-going basis.
  • Establish and maintain community service initiatives, while encouraging the participation of all members.
  • Participate in campus Greek-lettered and non-Greek governing councils, as well as non-Greek organizations and events.
  • Establish a positive and productive campus presence.
Expectations for Host Institutions

As the National Pan-Hellenic Council strives to collaborate with host institutions of our councils and affiliate chapters, the NPHC expects the following from those respective institutions:

1. Proper Advisement for Councils and Affiliate Chapters

  • Encourage and provide incentives for faculty and staff to become involved as faculty advisors to the NPHC council and affiliate chapters.
  • Provide a full-time staff member as the advisor to the NPHC council. If not a member of one of the NPHC affiliate organizations, that individual must be educated and credentialed on the operations and procedures of NPHC to be an effective advisor.

2.  Leadership Development

  • Provide a leadership class for all new members each term.
  • Provide and/or help identify and acquire funding to ensure Council attendance at NPHC national and regional conventions and conferences and other NPHC sponsored leadership training programs.

3. Council Support

  • Support and assist NPHC in establishing councils where there are two or more affiliate organizations at the institution.
  • Encourage expansion. No NPHC member organization is prohibited from selecting undergraduates for the purpose of establishing a chapter on the campus of the host institution. The host institution's NPHC Council may not deter expansion by withholding membership of NPHC organizations from the local Council.
  • Provide individual chapter, Greek system, and campus demographic information to council/chapters as requested.
  • Assist Council in meeting national and regional mandates, guidelines, and other requirements, including the payment of annual dues, submission of year-end report, attendance at national and regional meetings, and adherence to all national, regional, and local governing documents.
  • Provide an impartial judicial process with the opportunity for appeal.

4. Accountability

  • Provide the following data to NPHC Headquarters (at least once per year):
    • Campus, all men's/women's Greek system, and chapter GPAs by semester/quarter
    • Total number of men/women who began the Membership Intake Process in all chapters in an academic year
    • Total number of men/women initiated into all chapters in an academic year
    • Percentage of fraternity/sorority men/women compared to total number of all men/women on campus
    • Total number and name of chapters closed/opened in an academic yearStatus of the NPHC Council (e.g., inactive or active)
    • Total number of full-time Greek Life professionals on campus
  • Communicate with national or regional offices of the NPHC or affiliate organization upon receiving a reason of concern. When the issue or concern is a council issue, contact the NPHC Regional Office. If the issue involves (a) chapter(s) and warrants some type of action, please contact that/those respective affiliate equivalent (graduate chapter advisor, regional office, or International Headquarters).
National Association of Latino Fraternal Organizations Standards
National Association of Latino Fraternal Organizations
Shared Standards

Statement of Purpose

Established in March 1998, the National Association of Latino Fraternal Organizations, Inc. traces its roots back to several movements to empower Latino fraternities and sororities. For many years, Latino Greeks lacked basic information about their peers. As organizations expanded into different states and the Internet made information more readily available, Latino fraternity and sorority leaders worked to form a coalition. Starting in 1997, these leaders organized a series of meetings around the country to set the groundwork for what would become NALFO. At the 1998 Boston Conference NALFO took a major step forward by ratifying its constitution and bylaws. In 1999, the Board of Directors incorporated NALFO in Connecticut.

The heart of the organization is a sense of family that serves as a nationwide support system for all Latino fraternity and sorority members. NALFO allows members of all Latino fraternal organizations to come together as a family to voice issues of common concern and pool our resources for maximum benefit. In January 2001, NALFO again made history when it merged with a national Latino Greek council, Concilio Nacional de Hermandades Latinas (CNHL), to form the only national umbrella organization for historically Latino fraternities and sororities. As a result, the NALFO family currently includes 24 organizations from around the United States.

In an effort to assist institutions of higher learning across the nation and abroad in understanding the beginnings and function of historically Latino fraternities and sororities, and the standards governing these organizations, and in a further effort to continue to address issues of mutual concern, focusing on five essential and shared areas, to the NALFO and member organizations, these standards have been drafted.

Expectations for NALFO Undergraduate Councils

1. Continued promotion of academic excellence

  • Maintain grade point averages (GPAs) above the minimum GPA requirement to be an Active member of the chapter and organization as defined by the college or university, if standards are higher than said affiliate organization.
  • Maintain graduation rates equal to or which exceed the all men's or women's rates, respectively, on a given campus.
  • Develop scholarship programs that challenge members and potential members to achieve academically, provide scholastic support, and recognize both improvement and excellence in academic performance.

2. Demonstration of the values of NALFO, affiliate organizations, and host institutions.

  • Integrate the stated values and mission of NALFO, affiliate organizations, and the institution into all aspects of the organization and membership.
  • Develop and implement a local Judicial Council Committee to hold members accountable to the entire Greek-lettered community, as well as to the student code of conduct at the institution.
  • Sponsor monthly leadership programs which promote personal development and encourage implementation of best business practices.
  • Develop standards which discourage both the misuse of alcohol and the use of illegal drugs and which exact penalties.

3. Development of leadership skills.

  • Provide members with opportunities for leadership development workshops and programs, through NALFO, affiliate organizations, and  other programs sponsored by outside organizations.
  • Encourage affiliate chapter members to seek leadership roles in other campus organizations.

4. Development of positive supportive relationships.

  • Comply with all hazing and mandated policies of the state, college/university, NALFO, and affiliate organizations.
  • Create programs that enhance the Greek-letter community and student body and thereby contribute to a positive relationship with the community at large.
  • Demonstrate a genuine concern for all mankind.Seek an appropriately credentialed Graduate chapter and/or Faculty/Staff advisor(s) to serve as advisors to affiliate chapters and the local NALFO

5. Develop citizenship through community service and outreach.

  • Develop effective service projects and community outreach programs on an on-going basis.
  • Establish and maintain community service initiatives, while encouraging the participation of all members.Participate in campus Greek-lettered and non-Greek governing councils, as well as non-Greek organizations and events.
  • Establish a positive and productive campus presence.
Expectations for Host Institutions

As the National Association of Latino Fraternal Organizations strives to collaborate with host institutions of our councils and affiliate chapters, the NALFO expects the following from those respective institutions:

1. Proper Advisement for Councils and Affiliate Chapters

  • Encourage and provide incentives for faculty and staff to become involved as faculty advisors to the NALFO council and affiliate chapters.
  • Provide a full-time staff member as the advisor to the NALFO council. If not a member of one of the NALFO affiliate organizations, that individual must be educated and credentialed on the operations and procedures of NPHC to be an effective advisor.

2. Leadership Development

  • Provide a leadership class for all new members each term.
  • Provide and/or help identify and acquire funding to ensure Council attendance at NALFO national and regional conventions and conferences and other NALFO sponsored leadership training programs.

3. Council Support

  • Support and assist NALFO in establishing councils where there are two or more affiliate organizations at the institution.
  • Encourage expansion logical to the campus' population
  • Provide individual chapter, Greek system, and campus demographic information to council/chapters as requested.
  • Assist Council in meeting national and regional mandates, guidelines, and other requirements, including the payment of annual dues, submission of year-end report, attendance at national and regional meetings, and adherence to all national, regional, and local governing documents.
  • Provide an impartial judicial process with the opportunity for appeal.

4. Accountability

  • Provide the following data to NALFO Headquarters (at least once per year):
    • Campus, all men's/women's Greek system, and chapter GPAs by semester/quarter
    • Total number of men/women who began the Membership Intake Process in all chapters in an academic year
    • Total number of men/women initiated into all chapters in an academic year
    • Percentage of fraternity/sorority men/women compared to total number of all men/women on campus
    • Total number and name of chapters closed/opened in an academic year
    • Status of the NALFO Council (e.g., inactive or active)
    • Total number of full-time Greek Life professionals on campus
    • Graduation rates of undergraduates on campus
  • Communicate with national and regional offices of the NALFO or affiliate organization upon receiving a reason of concern. When the issue or concern is a council issue, contact the NALFO Regional Vice-Chair. If the issue involves (a) chapter(s) and warrants some type of action, please contact that/those respective affiliate equivalent (graduate chapter advisor, regional office, or Inter/national Headquarters).

NATIONAL FRATERNITY & SORORITY ORGANIZATION LINKS

 
North American Interfraternity Conference
  • Acacia
  • Alpha Chi Rho
  • Alpha Delta Gamma
  • Alpha Delta Phi
  • Alpha Epsilon Pi
  • Alpha Gamma Rho
  • Alpha Gamma Sigma
  • Alpha Kappa Lambda
  • Alpha Phi Delta
  • Alpha Sigma Phi
  • Alpha Tau Omega
  • Beta Sigma Psi
  • Beta Theta Pi
  • Chi Psi
  • Delta Chi
  • Delta Phi
  • Delta Psi
  • Delta Sigma Phi
  • Delta Tau Delta
  • Delta Upsilon
  • FarmHouse
  • Iota Phi Theta
  • Kappa Alpha Order
  • Kappa Alpha Psi
  • Kappa Alpha Society
  • Kappa Delta Phi, Inc.
  • Kappa Delta Rho
  • Kappa Sigma 
  • Lambda Chi Alpha
  • Lambda Phi Epsilon
  • Lambda Sigma Upsilon
  • Lamdba Theta Phi
  • Phi Delta Theta
  • Phi Eta Psi
  • Phi Gamma Delta
  • Phi Iota Alpha
  • Phi Kappa Psi
  • Phi Kappa Sigma
  • Phi Kappa Tau
  • Phi Kappa Theta
  • Phi Lambda Chi
  • Phi Mu Delta
  • Phi Sigma Kappa
  • Phi Sigma Phi
  • Pi Kappa Alpha
  • Pi Kappa Phi
  • Pi Lambda Phi
  • Psi Upsilon
  • Sigma Alpha Epsilon
  • Sigma Alpha Mu
  • Sigma Chi
  • Sigma Lambda Beta
  • Sigma Nu
  • Sigma Phi Epsilon
  • Sigma Phi Society
  • Sigma Pi
  • Sigma Tau Gamma
  • Tau Delta Phi
  • Tau Epsilon Phi
  • Tau Kappa Epsilon
  • Theta Chi
  • Theta Delta Chi
  • Theta Xi
  • Triangle
  • Zeta Beta Tau
  • Zeta Psi
Related National Organizations
Association of Fraternity Advisors (AFA)

The Association of Fraternity Advisors exists to support and stimulate persons who advise fraternities and sororities in higher education and to enhance the positive influence of the fraternity and sorority experience in student development by providing definition and recognition for the profession, encouraging research, establishing networks among related interests and creating forums for interaction and learning. Site contains: Leadership Directory, Regions, Getting Involved, Member Services, AFA List Serve, Job Placement, Resources, Annual Meeting, Documents, AFA Foundation, etc.

Bacchus and Gamma Peer Education Network

An international association of college and university based peer education programs focusing on alcohol abuse prevention and other student health and safety issues. Site contains: Tour B & G, Network Directory, Research & Statistics, Event Calendar, The Peer Educator, and Materials Catalog

Center for the Study of the College Fraternity

The Center for the Study of the College Fraternity was formed in 1979 to encourage and support research of the highest quality and educational significance on the role of the fraternity and sorority in higher education. The Center fulfills this mission in part through research grants, publication of monographs and the Update newsletter, and the indexing and collection of completed research projects. Site contains: About CSCF, Governance, Membership, Publications, Evaluation, Grants, Awards, Research, Journal, Links, and FAQ's

College Fraternity Editors Association

CFEA is focused on providing fraternal editors with professional training, an abundance of resources, and a network of contacts for the betterment of all fraternal communications. Site contains: About Us, Membership, Directories, Awards, and Resources

FIPG, Inc.

The leading resource of risk management education, programming, and information. Site contains: What is FIPG, News, Resources, Links, and Directories

Fraternity Executives Association (FEA)

The corporation is organized and shall at all times be operated exclusively to further the common interests of the Members of the Corporation by promoting, supporting, and encouraging the free discussion and exchange of ideas relating to college fraternal organizations. Site contains: Directors, Information, News and Notes, Summer Meeting, Membership, Calendar, and Update

Gamma Sigma Alpha

National Greek Academic Honor Society. Site contains: Starting a Chapter, Current Chapters, Suggested Activities, Requirements, Membership Benefits, Board Members, Supply Order Form, New Member Letter, Faculty Advisors, Research Initiative, and Helpful Links

Higher Education Center for Alcohol and Other Drug Prevention (HEC)

To help college and community leaders develop, implement, and evaluate programs and policies to reduce student problems related to alcohol and use and interpersonal violence. Site contains: Publications, Information and Assistance, Training, Evaluation, Alcohol & Other Drug News, The National Meeting, Safe and Drug-Free Schools Program, EDC’s Social Norms Marketing Research Project

Inter-Association Task Force on Alcohol and Other Substance Abuse Issues (IATF)

A higher education partnership promoting education, prevention and networking initiatives for the elimination of alcohol and other substance abuse. Site contains: Info Center, Overview, Mission, Activities, Members, and Key Links

Lambda 10 Project

Clearinghouse for educational resources and information pertaining to gay, lesbian, bisexual members of the college fraternity. Site contains: Features, News, and Resources

National Association of Latino Fraternal Organizations, Inc. (NALFO)

A national non-regulatory body, which promotes collaboration, unification and empowerment of all Latino fraternities and sororities. Site contains: Events, News, Newsletter, History, Board, Members, Guest Book, and Documentation

National Panhellenic Conference (NPC)

An organization for Greek women consisting of 26 sororities. Site contains: About NPC, Organizations, News & Events, Policies, CPH, APH, and Annual Report

National Pan-Hellenic Council (NPHC)

The NPHC promotes the well-being of its affiliate fraternities and sororities, facilitates the establishment and development of local councils of the NPHC and provides leadership training for its constituents. Site contains: Affiliates, Conferences, Directory, Forms & Files, Marketplace, News, Policy, Programs, Resolution, and Resources

North American Interfraternal Foundation

Promotes and supports leadership, educational, and research initiatives that advance the North American college fraternal experience by giving scholarships, grants, and recognition. Site contains: About Us, Scholarships, Grants, and Publications

North American Interfraternity Conference (NIC)

The NIC provides a variety of services to support and enhance the fraternity movement throughout the United States and Canada, including educational conferences, videotapes on contemporary fraternity issues, workbooks and manuals, and campus consultations. Site contains: About the NIC, Alcohol Summit, Congressional Reception, Councils/Alumni IFCs, Doing Business with Fraternities, Greeks in Sports, Heroes, Joining a Fraternity, News, NIC Foundation, NIC Resolution, Resources and Services Guide, Services and Programs, Scholarship, and Service to Others

Order of Omega

National Greek Honorary Fraternity. Site contains: History, Chapter Roster, National Officers, Chapter Directors, Constitution, Scholarships, Fellowships, Reference Manual, Calendar, Reference Guide, Charter a Chapter, Program Ideas, Position Statements, Past Minutes, Forms, Chapter Awards, and Related Links

Professional Fraternity Association

Supports professional fraternities and sororities to preserve high standards on campus and in professional practice. Site contains: History, Members & Associates, Directors, Benefits, Contact, and General

Related Regional Organizations
Mid-American Greek Council Association (MGCA)

The purpose of MGCA is to stimulate the growth and development of college Greek Councils by promoting leadership and educational experiences for student leaders at colleges and universities within a 16-state region. Site contains: Annual Conference, Resources, Greek Links, Area Conferences, Awards, Membership, Registration, Association Staff, About MGCA, Publications, Constitution, and Officers

Northeast Greek Leadership Association (NGLA) 

The Northeast Greek Leadership Association exists to promote the founding principles and positive traditions of all Greek letter organizations through opportunities that encourage learning and leadership for the Northeast region. Site contains: About NGLA, Member Services, Contact Info, Links, and Annual Conference

Southeastern Interfraternity Conference (SEIFC)

The Southeastern Interfraternity Conference (SEIFC) is a voluntary association of fraternity governing councils in the southeastern United States. SEIFC is one of the six regional associations throughout North America designed to bring together institutions and individuals with a commitment to fraternity life on college and university campuses. Site contains: Membership Information, Leadership Academy, Awards, Publications, Officers, Associate Members, and Links

Western Regional Greek Conference (WRGC)

The mission of the Western Regional Greek Conference is to provide members of fraternities and sororities an ongoing interactive educational and social learning environment, which enhances the collegiate experience. Site contains: History, Membership Information, Board of Directors and Executive Team of WRGC, Publications WRGC Constitution, WRGC Resolutions, WRGC 2002 Conference Information, Fall 2001 Newsletter, WRGC 2002 Award Applications and Information, Letter to Associate Members, and Resources & Links

PUBLICATION BIBLIOGRAPHIES

Gallup-Purdue Index Report 
Lambda 10 Publications

Out on Fraternity Row: Personal Accounts of Being Gay in a College Fraternity. (1998) Alyson Publications, Inc.

AFA Publications
  • Advising Fraternities & Sororities Manual
    • The Advising Fraternities & Sororities manual provides an overview of the many facets involved in working with fraternities and sororities. The resource is for both new and experienced fraternity and sorority advisors and is intended to be a collection of information for immediate reference. Chapters reflect the personality and expertise of their author(s) and cover the following topics.

    • The American Fraternity, Addendum to "The American Fraternity", The National Panhellenic Conference, The North-American Interfraternity Conference, The National Pan-Hellenic Council, Inc., The National Association of Latino Fraternal Organizations, Inc., The Association of Fraternity Advisors, Inc., The Role of the Fraternity and Sorority Professional, Organizing and Operating the Office of Fraternity and Sorority Affairs, The Relationship Between the Inter/National Organization and the Fraternity/Sorority Advisor, Advising Councils and Chapters, Risk Management, Programming, Public Relations, Publicity, and Publications

  • Ideas for Practice Manual
    • This 150 page resource is a compilation of the best ideas for practice within the fraternity/sorority community. Created so colleagues can share their best ideas, this resource will grow and change over time. Insert this first compilation into your programming binder, share it with your councils, chapters and volunteers and adapt the ideas to your campus or chapter environment. Ideas are included in the following topics:

    • All Fraternity/Sorority Events, Alumni/ae and Advisors, Campus Outreach, Communications/Public Relations, Community Outreach, Diversity, Housing, Leadership Development, Recruitment, Risk Management, Scholarship, Standards and Recognition Programs

  • Center for the Study of the College Fraternity Publications
    • Abrahamson, Judith P. (1987). The influences of student involvement by sorority membership. Bloomington, IN: Center for the Study of the College Fraternity, 48 pp. A study conducted at Indiana University to determine the level of women students' involvement in the University by their being a member of a sorority or living in a residence hall. The findings supported the supposition that women involved in Greek life were more involved in the University than their non-member peers. It was also found that the personal backgrounds of the women surveyed were not significant in the level of their involvement.


RELEVANT RESEARCH

Alcohol Use
  • A Comparison of Drinking Behaviors of Students in Greek Organizations and Students active in a Campus Volunteer Organization

    • (From the study's abstract) The drinking habits of students who are members of Greek organizations and a student volunteer organization were compared using the Core Survey, a survey developed by the Higher Education Center for Alcohol and Other Drug Prevention (1999) and administered widely to students in higher education. Three hundred and twenty-one students from a midwestern university participated in the study. Results indicated that Greeks drink more than volunteering students. However, there were no significant differences between Greeks and volunteers on certain specific negative side effects of drinking.

  • College factors that influence drinking

    • (Adapted from the study's abstract) The purpose of this article is to examine the aspects of collegiate environments, rather than student characteristics, that influence drinking. Unfortunately, the existing literature is scant on this topic. Several factors have been shown to relate to drinking: (1) organizational property variables of campuses, including affiliations (historically black institutions, women's institutions), presence of a Greek system, athletics and 2- or 4-year designation; (2) physical and behavioral property variables of campuses, including type of residence, institution size, location and quantity of heavy episodic drinking; and (3) campus community property variables, including pricing and availability and outlet density.

  • Fraternity and sorority members and alcohol and other drug

    • Students in U.S. college fraternities and sororities have generally been thought to be heavy drinkers. Studies are now examining this perception and confirming that fraternity and sorority members do drink greater amounts of alcohol, and more frequently, than anyone else on campus. Students affiliated with campus Greek societies, whether full members or pledges, should be considered a high-risk population for alcohol abuse and its consequences, including poor academic performance, unprotected sexual activity, fighting, serious injury, and rape.

  • Secondhand effects of student alcohol use reported by neighbors of colleges: the role of alcohol outlets

    • (Adapted from the study's abstract) This study, conducted by Harvard's School of Public Health, examines the secondary effects of student alcohol use experienced by residents of neighborhoods near college campuses. Neighbors living near college campuses were more likely to report a lowered quality of neighborhood life through such secondhand effects of heavy alcohol use as noise and disturbances, vandalism, drunkeness, vomiting, and urination.

  • Trends in college binge drinking during a period of increased prevention efforts (Harvard College Alcohol Study Surveys 1993-2001)

    • (Adapted from the study's abstract) Responses in the four survey years (1993, 1997, 1999, 2001) were compared to determine trends in heavy alcohol use, alcohol-related problems, and encounters with college and community prevention efforts. Very little change in overall binge drining occurred at the individual college level.

Book Review  
  • New Challenges for Greek Letter Organizations: Transforming Fraternities and Sororities into Learning Communities 

    • The newest book in the New Directions for Student Services series from Jossey-Bass, "New Challenges for Greek Letter Organizations: Transforming Fraternities and Sororities into Learning Communities," examines issues surrounding Greek letter organizations and their educational value.

Eating Disorders
  • Risk for disordered eating relates to both gender and ethnicity for college students

    • (Adapted from the study's abstract) To estimate the frequency of disordered eating behaviors among college students and associations by gender, ethnicity, participation in social organizations and college athletics and to determine whether responses to eight health behavior and attitude questions and body weight predicted a high score on the Eating Attitudes Test (EAT)-26, a screening instrument used to identify risks of developing an eating disorder. The study indicates that sorority woman have higher rates of eating disorder behaviors than any other student sub group.

Hazing
  • National Research on the Prevalance of Hazing

Risk Management
  • School, college, and university dormitory, fraternity, and sorority house fires

    • Facts & Figures* In 1998, there were an estimated 1,380 structure fires in school, college and university dormitories and fraternity and sorority housing. These fires resulted in no deaths**, 87 injuries, and $5.9 million in direct property damage. The leading cause of fire in these types of occupancies was incendiary or suspicious. The second and third leading causes of these on and off campus housing fires were cooking and smoking, respectively. An annual average of 141 structure fires occurred in fraternity and sorority houses per year between 1994 and 1998, resulting in no deaths**, 17 injuries, and $2.8 million in direct property damage. Smoke or fire alarms were present in 93% of all dormitory fires in 1998, and sprinklers were present in 35% of these fires. On average, direct property damage per fire is 41% lower in dormitory fires where sprinklers are present, compared to those where sprinklers are not present. (*From NFPA's Structure Fires in Dormitory Properties, April 2002)

  • Social host liability: Risks for fraternities and student hosts

    • (From the study's abstract) The author examines social host liability doctrines as interpreted by the courts and discusses them in relation to the college and university. Based on a study of campus fraternity chapters, their attitudes and knowledge about social host liability, and their methods of addressing this possible problem, the author suggests ways that university administrators can assist in preventing these cases.

Sexual Assault
  • A qualitative assessment of “The Men’s Program:” The impact of a rape prevention program on fraternity men 

    • (From the study's abstract) This qualitative study examined the impact of an all-male rape prevention program on fraternity men. Seven months after participating in “The Men’s Program,” fraternity men were asked whether during the previous year the program impacted their attitude or behavior and if so what about the program led to that change. Results point to the importance of establishing empathy with rape survivors to increase men’s awareness and sensitivity to rape.

Student Academics
  • Academic procrastinators: Their rationalizations and web-course performance

Events

One of the best resources available to you is the wide range of professional development opportunities. This list contains both our “Hosted Events,” workshops and webinars that we plan and manage, and some “Related Events,” hosted by the NASPA Central Office or other NASPA Constituent Groups. To see a full listing of NASPA events, please see the Events page.

 

Signature Initiatives

NATIONAL HAZING STUDY

NASPA has joined with a number of national organizations to support the "National Research Initiative to Examine the Nature and Prevalence of Hazing in Colleges and Universities." The study is being developed by Dr. Elizabeth Allan, Assistant Professor of Higher Educational Leadership at the University of Maine.

According to Dr. Allan, "The study will investigate the nature and prevalence of hazing practices across a range of student groups within colleges and universities in the U.S. By addressing the lack of empirical data, the study will provide foundational data from which to assess campus climates and to inform best practices for hazing prevention and intervention.

The research aims to generate breadth of knowledge and promote more in-depth understanding about hazing in postsecondary educational institutions with possible applications to other populations as well.

More specifically, the goals of the study are to investigate the prevalence and nature of hazing behaviors among students in U.S. colleges and universities, and offer research-based strategies for responding to and preventing the problem of hazing among college students with transferability to middle and secondary schools.”

DAY OF DIALOGUE

Concept

The "Day of Dialogue" is, at its heart, a simple concept. To engage in a "Day of Dialogue" means simply to take the time to get the right group of people into the right set of circumstances to allow meaningful discussion about a topic of common concern.

  • In this case the "right group of people" is some combination of those who share a commitment to your particular campus and to the ideals of fraternity and sorority life - chapter members and leaders, national staff, national and local alumni volunteers, faculty and staff, and other.
  • The "right circumstances" are those that provide a clear goal, an appropriate meeting space, a meaningful agenda, a date and time that meets participants needs, and sufficient structure to allow the discussion to progress.
  • A "meaningful discussion" is one where all participants have access to critical information, where an atmosphere of trust and openness leads to honest sharing of ideas and concerns, where the purpose is to accomplish a common goal, and where one of the outcomes is a commitment to a next step or a plan.
  • The "topic of common concern" is the prevalence of high-risk drinking on college campuses and, particularly, among fraternity and sorority members.
Background
Rationale
  • Collaboration between the various parties is critical to the success of any campus-based change effort.
  • The experiences of campuses that have already had such discussions can be shared and used by institutions that have yet to take the step.
  • The designation of a national “Day of Dialogue” can serve to spur the initiation of discussions that might otherwise not begin.
Initiation and Sponsorship

This project was initiated by the Greek Summit, an annual gathering sponsored by NASPA's Fraternity/Sorority Affairs Knowledge Community. The Greek Summit brings together representatives of higher education and inter/national organizations to effect the change needed to help students' behavior better reflect the founding principles of their organizations and the missions of their educational institutions. The idea for a national "Day of Dialogue" on the issues surrounding alcohol use within the Greek community emerged from the 1999 meeting of the Summit and was adopted by NASPA's Fraternity/Sorority Knowledge Community at its March, 2000 meeting.

The Inter-Association Task Force on Alcohol and Other Substance Abuse Issues is a coalition of vital organizations who collaborate on issues relating to substance abuse prevention efforts within the higher education community. The Task Force sponsors National Collegiate Alcohol Awareness Week (NCAAW)and has listed the “Day of Dialogue” in its resource guide for NCAAW campus planning. Though initially developed for application in the fraternity and sorority community, the principles and tools of the “Day of Dialogue” can be applied practically in a campus-wide effort.

Please send all evaluative materials to the project coordinator. Contact information is located at the bottom of the front page of the Day of Dialogue website.

Co-Sponsoring Organizations

"Day of Dialogue" is presented in part through the generous financial support of the North American Interfraternal Foundation (NIF).

Each of the following national organizations has endorsed the "Day of Dialogue" program:

  • The Inter-Association Task Force on Alcohol and Other Substance Abuse Issues
  • National Panhellenic Conference (NPC)
  • National Pan-Hellenic Council (NPHC)
  • North-American Interfraternity Council (NIC)
  • National Association of Latino Fraternal Organizations (NALFO)
  • Association of Fraternity Advisors (AFA)
  • The Alcohol-Free Housing Alliance
  • The Higher Education Center for Alcohol and Other Drug Prevention (HEC)
  • Fraternity Executives Association
Sample Press Release

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE CONTACT:

-Your Name-
-Your Phone Number-
-Your E-mail Address-
-NAME OF UNIVERSITY- TAKES ON ALCOHOL ABUSE IN “DAY OF DIALOGUE”
-City, state of release-, -date- -Recognizing the significant damage high risk drinking is causing students, the University/College, and the community, -name of university- is calling for a “Day of Dialogue.”

The goal of the “Day of Dialogue” is to confront the difficult issues caused by alcohol, other drug and violence and to develop programs of action to reduce the problems. During the program, students, faculty, staff, alumni, and community members will engage in extensive, planned discussions of alcohol-related problems and possible solutions. The discussions will serve as the basis for collaborative, campus-based action planning.

The “Day of Dialogue” program at -name of university- will be held on -date- at -location and time-. The event will feature -details: key speakers, members of discussion panel, etc.-

“Changing a campus culture as it relates to high-risk drinking is a serious undertaking," says Dr. Penny Rue, Chair, National Association of Student Personnel Administrators’ (NASPA) Fraternity and Sorority Affairs Knowledge Community and Dean of Students at University of Virginia. "We’re suggesting that an intensive dialogue involving all of the key stakeholders is critical to beginning or advancing the change process.”

The “Day of Dialogue” program was initiated in 1999 by the Greek Summit, an annual gathering of representatives of higher education and inter/national organizations sponsored by NASPA’s Fraternity/Sorority Affairs Knowledge Community. For more information on the national program, please contact Day of Dialogue Coordinator Geof Brown, Vice President of Alcohol Education, North-American Interfraternity Conference, at 317 872-1134 x 211 or email at geof@nicindy.org

Steering Committee

The Steering Committee that developed "Day of Dialogue:"

  • Lissa Bradford, NPC/NIC Alcohol-Free Housing Task Force (Co-chair)
  • Terry Hogan, Dean of Students, Ohio University (Co-chair)
  • Cari Cook, Executive Director, Delta Delta Delta
  • Sue Kraft Fussell, Executive Director, Association of Fraternity Advisors
  • Chris Heasley, Consultant, Phi Gamma Delta
  • Jaime Hockensmith, Panhellenic VP for Risk Management, Indiana University
  • Michael Johnson, Director of Alcohol Education, Phi Gamma Delta
  • Erika London, President, Pennsylvania State University Panhellenic Council
  • Bob Maust, University of Colorado
  • Monica Miranda, Vice Chair, National Association of Latino Fraternal Organizations
  • Jon Williamson, Executive Vice President, North-American Interfraternity Conference
  • Ann Wilson, Program Advisor, Ohio University
Participating Campuses

Staff at these campuses have indicated that they have produced an a "Day of Dialogue" activity on their campus:

  • Ball State University
  • Bowling Green State University
  • Eastern Michigan University
  • Lenoir-Rhyne College
  • Ohio University
  • Oklahoma State University
  • Otterbein College
  • Southern Methodist University
  • Southwest Texas State University
  • Syracuse University
  • Texas A & M University
  • Tulane University
  • University of Missouri-Columbia
  • University of Dayton
  • University of Delaware
  • University of Florida
  • University of Idaho
  • University of New Hampshire
  • University of South Alabama
  • Vanderbilt University
  • West Texas A&M University
  • West Virginia University
  • Wittenberg University
Sample Activities
Bowling Green State University
  • Program: Panel followed by Dialogue
  • Highlight: Used topic of community relations to lead into discussions of alcohol; used multiple media (faculty/staff newsletter, two local newspapers, University Web site) to preview and report on “Day of Dialogue”
Eastern Michigan University
  • Program: Three events over the course of the day, A variety of sessions in which participants could individually choose topics of interest, Mocktail social hour, Presentation by the Campus Close-Up Theatre Troupe
  • Highlight: Used a variety of approaches and included students, staff, and members of the community to engage in meaningful dialogue
Oklahoma State University
  • Program: Three events over the course of a day, welcome and discussion with chief student affairs officer, Peer-facilitated student-only discussion, Panel with University and community representatives
  • Highlight: Rich dialogue led to identification of important “local” issues and solutions
Southern Methodist University
  • Program: Four events over the course of a day, Three debates on alcohol topics by the Debate Team, DW Eyes – game of altered perception using “goggles”, Surveyed and reported on student drinking behaviors to correct misperceptions, Town Hall Meeting
  • Highlight: Used daytime fun promotional activities to encourage participation in Town Hall Meeting
University of Delaware
  • Program: Three events over the course of a day, Brown bag lunch and panel with outside members, Discussion on risk management with chapter leaders, Keynote speaker on risk management issues
  • Highlight: Used the event to successfully advance the adoption of a third party vendor resolution by the Panhellenic Association
University of Missouri-Columbia
  • Program: Two events, Brown bag lunch with discussion facilitated by the chief student affairs officer regarding the new campus alcohol policy, Legal issues panel; panelists included members of city and campus police, the liquor control board, and a local judge
  • Highlight: Partnered with the Wellness Resource Center to add “Day of Dialogue” to the events of Alcohol Responsibility Month and students were given participation points for attending
University of Nebraska-Lincoln
  • Program: Eight hour-long series of six events, Welcome by institutional leader, Panel including report on survey results, Breakout discussions facilitated by alumni, Dinner with speaker, Second breakout sessions for action planning, Inspirational keynote for closing
  • Highlight: Mixed multiple approaches and gained broad stakeholder involvement
Texas A&M University
  • Program: Three-part event during one evening, Opening speaker, Panel presentation with Q&A, Small group discussion
  • Highlight: Developed and distributed a newsletter to participants to continue information sharing
Vanderbilt University
  • Program: Four events over the course of the day, Alcohol trivia and prizes activity, “True Story” testimonial presented by a peer from another institution, Panel on alcohol policy, Interactive activity/discussion on relationships and alcohol
  • Highlight: Used topic of personal male/female relationships to lead discussions on alcohol
West Texas A&M University
  • Program: Panel of students with varied backgrounds moderated by an on-campus professor. The professor used the topic of racial identity to get at issues of alcohol.
  • Highlight: Excellent conversations about the divisions perceived to exist on campus
Program Evaluation

In order to continue to build this project, we need your evaluation of the event you developed for your campus. The information you share will be provided to future participants so they can benefit from your experience. Use and attach additional pages if necessary. Thank you for your participation.

Please provide the following information:

  1. Name of school:
  2. Date(s) of your event:
  3. Number of participants who were expected to attend:
  4. Number of participants who actually attended:
  5. Please describe the format of your event (or attach an agenda):
  6. Please describe the strength and weaknesses of your event from the perspective of event planners (including yourself):
  7. Please describe the strength and weaknesses of your event from the perspective of participants (if available):
  8. Please attach any promotional materials, news clippings, summary reports, agendas, or other materials related to the event.

Please send all evaluative materials to the project coordinator. Contact information is located at the bottom of the front page of the Day of Dialogue website.

A CALL FOR VALUES CONGRUENCE

The leadership of the Fraternity and Sorority Affairs KC has been working with representatives of the Association of Fraternity Advisors (AFA), American Association of State Colleges and Universities (AASCU), the National Association of Independent Colleges and Universities (NAICU), the National Association of State Universities and Land Grant Colleges (NASULGC), National Panhellenic Conference (NPC), North-American Interfraternity Conference (NIC) and the Inter-Association Task Force on Alcohol (IATF) to help bring to life the "Call for Values Congruence" document developed at Franklin Square.

In addition to considering this document at Greek Summit VII in Indianapolis, a meeting was held at the AFA Conference in San Antonio in December 2003 and a National Greek Summit was held in Washington, DC in February 2004. Further discussion took place at the NASPA National Conference in Denver in March 2004.

Much progress has been made and the presidents' organizations are working to produce a document summarizing the outcomes of this effort. Don Mills, past national chair of the KC, is coordinating NASPA's ongoing involvement in this process.

  • View the original "Call for Values Congruence" document.

 

Standards

Several national Greek organizations have adopted various standards and expectations to support the "Call for Values Congruence" documents. Links to these documents include:

  • National Pan-Hellenic Council, Inc. (NPHC)
  • National Association of Latino Fraternal Organizations (NALFO)
  • North-American Interfraternity Conference (NIC)
  • National Panhellenic Conference (NPC)

FRATERNAL FUTURES

"Fraternal Futures" is a project developed by Dennis Roberts of Miami University. Seeds for the project were planted through dialogue at a number of the early Greek Summitts hosted by the NASPA Fraternity and Sorority Affairs KC.

According to Laura Hayhoe, who has collaborated with Dr. Roberts on the project, "The Fraternal Futures deliberation model . . . asks fraternity and sorority members to tackle difficult questions, explore possible futures and choose a collective direction for their campus community. The deliberations challenge students to consider what their Greek system should look like in order for it to survive and thrive in the future."

An article written by Dr. Roberts and Laura Hayhoe follows. It was written for the Kettering Foundation which has provided financial support to the project. It is used here with permission. For additional information regarding the project, contact Dennis Roberts.

Fraternal Futures: Empowering Undergraduate Fraternity and Sorority Members to Take Hold of Their Future
  • By Laura Hayhoe and Dennis C. Roberts, Ph.D.

    With the founding of the first social fraternity in 1825, college students were offered a home away from home, a social outlet, high academic and behavioral expectations, and a way to get involved in the community. Since that time, millions of men and women have entered into these organizations that are represented by ritual, secrecy and a sense of brother or sisterhood. Greek organizations pride themselves on attracting the best of the best of college populations, and fraternity and sorority members often have higher GPAs then non-affiliated students, higher graduation averages and perform considerable community and philanthropic service. In recent years, however, the number of students interested in joining these organizations has significantly declined. While the exact cause of this decline is not clear, it is obvious that fraternity and sorority members need to be actively involved in protecting their future if the survival of Greek organizations is to be certain in the years to come. (Roberts and Rogers, 2003)

    There are both significant advantages and disadvantages to affiliation with fraternal (sometimes referred to as “Greek”) organizations. The disadvantages are often so detrimental to members, organizations, and host institutions that the international headquarter personnel and campus administrators who oversee them take them over in exasperation. However, without student involvement, lasting and deep change is unlikely to take place.

    Fundamental change is the only way to resolve the persistent problems that have plagued fraternal organizations. Members have to be drawn from passivity to action and they have to engage in critical and informed analyses in order to secure a promising future.

    Recognizing the problems of traditional methods of change, Miami University requested the assistance of the Kettering Foundation two years ago to approach fraternal change from the grassroots level. Since that time, undergraduate students have helped to develop “Fraternal Futures” based on the National Issues Forum model. Speaking to students, both affiliated and non-affiliated, parents, faculty, community members, headquarter staff, and campus administrators, students at Miami researched the presumed advantages and disadvantages of fraternity life. From this research, students discovered that there were three possible directions for fraternal organizations. Following the first approach, undergraduate members would make their organizations more accessible. Opening themselves up to a more diverse membership, new recruitment techniques, and positive public relations, would ensure that fraternal organizations would survive and thrive in the future. The second approach asks undergraduate students to examine fraternal organization founding values and accountability practices to which they hold their members responsible. By examining standards that members should uphold, and enforcing these expectations, fraternity and sorority members can ensure the survival of fraternal organizations. The final approach asks affiliated students to examine fraternities and sororities as the campus health and safety hazards they often have become. By making fraternal organizations safer, and educating the entire campus community on health and safety issues, these organizations would become invaluable to campus communities, and therefore ensure survival.

    Since finalizing the Fraternal Futures model a year ago, approximately four hundred undergraduate students have participated in forums to deliberate on the future of fraternal organizations. Undergraduate members of these organizations were trained by the Foundation and have led deliberations at Miami University of Oxford, Ohio, Jacksonville State University of Jacksonville, Alabama, Westminster College of Fulton, Missouri, and Kutztown University of Kutztown, Pennsylvania. Each campus has been remarkably different, some with high percentages of students affiliated with these groups, some with populations of less than 1%, highly traditional campuses, large campuses, a campus with less than 1000 students, and commuter campuses. Depending on the situation of the campus, and the particular problems of the fraternal system there, the preferred approach of undergraduate students has been different. Despite the differences in “Fraternal Futures” conversations, each deliberation has demonstrated that students value hearing from others about concerns that affect a system that has become such an integral part of their college experience.

    To measure the impact of the “Fraternal Futures” deliberation, we have utilized a pre and post forum survey to determine differences in response. Using a model based on Berkowitz’s model for change, it is necessary that people realize there is a problem, feel they have a role in fixing the problem, believe they have the skills to change the problem, and are committed enough to take action for real change to occur (Berkowitz, 1997 & 1998). Therefore, before and after the deliberation, we ask students to rate themselves in each of the above four areas. Additionally, we ask students to indicate what approach(es) they value, and what tradeoffs they would be willing to accept in realizing positive change for their organizations. Finally, students comment on how their perspectives on fraternal life and citizen participation have changed. On all four campuses, students have indicated higher ratings on all four components of Berkowitz’s model after deliberating. Additionally, most students are willing to accept tradeoffs detailing longer hours spent with their chapter, but do not want to see the tight brother or sisterhood bonds they have developed decreased. As we continue our work at Miami University with the project, we will be reporting results to students, campus staff, and headquarters so that the student voice may be represented in change initiatives on all levels. Additionally, we are now embarking on a project that uses the “Fraternal Futures” deliberations as a starting point for increased civic engagement on our campus. Through using the concept of deliberation and active citizen involvement, we believe that the Miami community can engage in respectful and important dialogue, preparing students to be more actively involved in the larger community throughout life.

    The support provided by the Kettering Foundation in establishing the “Fraternal Futures” initiative provides a way to foster shared leadership for the kind of changes that will allow these organizations to exist in the coming years. If there is enough merit to preserve fraternal organizations as a way to actively involve students in campus life, to enhance learning about community living and democratic life, then the support and encouragement of headquarters, campuses, alumni, and foundations such as Kettering will be needed. Fraternal organizations in North America are on nearly one thousand campuses and freedom of association rights portend that they are not likely to go away as organizations with which students affiliate, either as on-campus or off-campus unaffiliated groups. It is to all our benefit to take fraternities and sororities seriously and to establish mutually beneficial models for their enhancement. Empowering members to take responsibility for themselves and requiring that brothers and sisters share the responsibility for improving them represents one of the only rays of hope on the horizon and the Kettering Foundation has supported deliberation as a starting place in doing this.

    References

    Berkowitz, A.D. (September/October 1998). “The proactive prevention model: Helping students translate healthy beliefs into healthy actions.” About Campus. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass, pp. 26-28.

    Berkowitz, A.D. (1997). “From reactive to proactive prevention: Promoting an ecology of health on campus.” In Rivers, P.C. and Shore, E.R. Substance abuse on campus: a handbook for college and university personnel. Westport, CT: Greenwood Publishing Group, pp. 119-139.

    Roberts, D.C. and Rogers, J. (2003). Transforming Fraternal Leadership. In Gregory, D. (ed.), The administration of fraternal social organizations on American campuses: A pattern for the new millennium. Asheville, NC: College Administration Publications, Inc., pp. 327-343.

  •  

ALCOHOL FREE HOUSING

Purpose

The Alcohol-Free Housing Task Force is co-sponsored by the NASPA Fraternity and Sorority Affairs Knowledge Community and works to raise standards regarding the use of alcohol in fraternity housing across North America. The Task Force seeks to change the alcohol-centered norms in fraternity life thru education and modeling and, thus, improve the health and safety of collegiate fraternity members.

Resources

Complete information about the efforts of the Task Force including a listing of campuses and fraternities that have adopted alcohol-free policies, definitions, research findings, and current news is available from the coordinator.

Awards