2014-09-16

Violence Prevention

The Violence Prevention focus area brings together a variety of NASPA programs that provide resources for members to build comprehensive and intentional violence prevention and response programs on their campuses, including providing primary, secondary, and tertiary prevention that address both the occurrence of violence and its root causes. Through involvement in NASPA’s many constituent groups, including the Campus Safety and Violence Prevention KC, Men and Masculinities KC, the Campus Sexual and Relationship Violence Prevention and Response KC, and Women in Student Affairs, you can engage with and learn from other professionals who are responsible for addressing a wide range of violence prevention and response concerns, including student conduct professionals, prevention educators, advocates, and Title IX coordinators, among others. Additionally, NASPA hosts professional development events such as the Sexual Violence Prevention and Response Conference: A NASPA Strategies conference among others, where you can learn how to educate yourself and others about violence and the culture that supports it, to become an advocate for victims, and to create more inclusive campus climates. NASPA is also proud to be the home of Culture of Respect, an initiative dedicated to working with college stakeholders to improve institutional efforts to address sexual violence on campus.

Violence Prevention
Constituent Groups

Violence Prevention
Publications

Violence Prevention
Initiatives & Awards

Ongoing NASPA initiatives that focus on or include violence prevention topics.

Culture of Respect
Culture of Respect logo
Culture of Respect builds the capacity of educational institutions to end sexual violence through ongoing, expansive organizational change.
#SApledge: “It’s On Us” to Stop Gender-Based Violence
#SApledge: “It’s On Us” to Stop Gender-Based Violence logo
"It's On Us" is a White House initiative aimed at preventing gender-based violence on campus. NASPA is doing its part with the "#SApledge."

Related Posts

  • NASPA’s Initial Analysis of the Proposed Rule on Title IX, Part 1

    Just before the Thanksgiving holiday, the Department of Education released the text of their Notice of Proposed Rulemaking (NPRM) on Title IX. This ended an over-year-long wait that started in September 2017 when Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos rescinded guidance set by the Obama administration in 2011 and 2014 and released interim guidance.This is the first in a series of posts by NASPA staff from the Research and Policy Institute (RPI) and Culture of Respect to be released over the first half of December with our initial analysis of the proposed rule. Our hope is to provide information in an easily consumable format and length as soon as possible. Additional analysis on many of these topics is already available from a wide range of associations and organizations and NASPA’s RPI will be making more in-depth analysis on several of the issues below available in early January to assist student affairs professionals in responding to the call for comment with appropriate research and data.

    Posted on December 6, 2018 at 07:23 AM by RPI Blog
  • Perspectives on the Proposed Title IX Regulations from the Practitioners

    The Sexual and Relationship Violence Prevention, Education and Response Knowledge Community leadership team provides its perspective on the Title IX regulations that have been proposed by the Department of Education.

    Posted on November 29, 2018 at 08:17 AM by Sexual and Relationship Violence Prevention, Education, and Response
  • SA Weekly: November 19

    SA Weekly - your destination for higher ed news, NASPA research and policy, constituent blogs, and more. Catch up on everything that has happened in the last week including: Sharp Divide Over Trump Administration's Title IX Overhaul; College Closures Due to Poor Air Quality; Three Ways Advising Has Evolved; and Why I Give: Lori White.

    Posted on November 19, 2018 at 06:34 PM by NASPA Blog
  • Distinguishing Between Belief and Culture: A Critical Perspective on Religious Identity

    As religious tension has risen (and continues to rise) both domestically and abroad, so too have campus-based initiatives aimed at reducing this tension by promoting respect for religious diversity and social justice for religious minorities. The current body of scholarship related to this phenomenon typically relies on an interpretation of religion and religious identity that emphasizes belief as a central (if not the only) component defining this aspect of students’ identities. This widely accepted and unchallenged perspective downplays (or overlooks entirely) the socio-cultural nature of religion, contradicting literature in both religious studies and critical identity studies that explains how persons’ religious cultures are largely unrelated to their personal beliefs.

    Posted on November 9, 2018 at 04:20 PM by NASPA Blog

Get in Touch with NASPA

×