Asian Pacific Islanders

Asian Pacific Islanders

The Asian Pacific Islander Knowledge Community seeks to educate and inform NASPA members about the current issues, trends, and research facing Asian Pacific Islanders in higher education. We actively nurture and support the professional development of students and professionals through a variety of programs and by providing leadership and involvement opportunities within the KC.

Message from the Co-Chairs

Welcome to NASPA APIKC! We support the development of students and professionals through a sense of community (‘ohana), involvement, advocacy, and scholarship. Please join us with increasing the understanding and awareness of APIDAs within higher education.

About

The APIKC is home to a group of dedicated and dynamic student affairs professionals as well as graduate and undergraduate students and we hope you take the time to get to know our growing community. The APIKC would not be what it is today without the outstanding work of our national and regional leadership team and our members. A sincere thank you to all of you for the work you do on a daily basis to ensure the vitality and visibility of our diverse community!

Mission

The Asian Pacific Islander Knowledge Community seeks to educate and inform NASPA members about the current issues, trends, and research facing Asian Pacific Islanders in higher education. We actively nurture and support the professional development of students and professionals through an offering an e-mentoring program, producing and sharing research, encouraging dialogue via online forums around issues facing our Asian Pacific Islander communities, and providing leadership and involvement opportunities within the KC. As one of the ethnicity-based knowledge communities, this KC is committed to honoring and respecting the multiple and diverse communities that exist within the greater Asian Pacific Islander category and strives to increase knowledge and understanding with the student affairs profession.

History

The API KC has a long and rich history that we'd love to share with you! Below is a recounting of our history that was compiled by Dr. Julie Wong and revised by Karlen Suga based on interviews conducted by Danielle Howard, Rouel Velasco, Kevin Gin, Hikaru Kozuma, and Karlen Suga.

1988 - St. Louis
  • The first Minority Caucus Meeting is convened; Henry Gee attends and is the only non African American
  • Moved from Caucus to a Network called Network for Educational Equity & Ethnic Diversity (NEEED)
  • NEEED was primarily African American and Latino
1989 - Denver
  • Dr. Hal Gin begins a two-year term on NASPA’s Board of Directors
1989 - Philadelphia
  • Henry Gee becmes the chair of the Network for Educational Equity and Ethnic Diversity (NEEED)
1999 - New Orleans
  • Daren Mooko serves as chair of the API Collective; planned a dinner for the group that attracted 20-25 members. It was the first significant API gathering at a NASPA National Conference.
  • Dr. Anna Gonzalez and Sunny Lee appointed as new API Network Chair
  • Dr. Gwendolyn Mink, a professor at the University of California at Santa Cruz and daughter of the late Patsy Takemoto Mink, the first Asian American Congresswoman, is a featured speaker at the conference. The movement for this is initiated by Dr. Amy Agbayani, who recognized the need to have APIDAs as conference speakers.
2000 - Indianapolis
  • Dr. Anna Gonzalez and Sunny Lee serve as Co-Chairs of API Network
  • Dr. Doris Ching becomes the first Asian American President of NASPA; also recognized as a Pillar of the Profession
  • Strong showing of APA’s at NASPA – many to support Doris
  • Dr. Doris Ching attends an initiative meeting organized by Tim Chang and Sunny Lee where young professionals express a need for support and mentoring. Needs expressed at this meeting lead to more formalized programs and initiatives within the API Network aimed at supporting and mentoring young professionals.
2001 - Seattle
  • Dr. Anna Gonzalez and Sunny Lee serve as Co-Chairs of API Network
  • Helen Zia  serves as a featured conference speaker
  • API Reception is held and funded off of $300 which was donated by Dr. Doris Ching, Dr. Amy Agbayani, and Dr. Anna Gonzalez
  • Dr. Doris Ching is Awarded NASPA Pillar of the Profession Award
  • E-mentoring program implemented
  • Mike Segawa serves as Conference Program Chair; Henry Gee serves as the chair of Conference Speakers
  • Started Graduate Student & New professional Social
2002 - Boston
  • Dr. Anna Gonzalez & Sunny Lee  serve Co-Chairs of API Network
  • Shattering the Glass Ceiling Award established; Doris Ching named the inaugural recipient.
  • Anna Gonzalez and Sunny Lee attend Knowledge Community meetings. 
  • Discussions of eliminating Networks in favor of Knowledge Communities so ethnic groups would have a seat at the table.
  • Wanted to maintain ties with African American and Latino Knowledge Communities 
  • Dr. Amy Agbayani, Dr. Alan Yang, and Dr. Hal Gin are recognized as Pillars of the Profession
  • Dr. Doris Ching begins a two-year term as President of the NASPA Foundation Board
  • Dr. Julie Wong & Christine Quemuel are asked to be the new APIKC co-chairs
2003 - St. Louis
  • Christine Quemuel & Dr, Julie Wong begin serving co-chairs of the APIKC;  established and set goals of creating a sense of family within the APIKC, creating structure to the leadership team by forming national committees, and fostering connections between senior members of the KC and younger professionals
  • API Network is officially changed to API Knowledge Community; NEEED and NEEED reception are no longer in existence
  • Henry Gee receives the Shattering the Glass Ceiling Award
  • Dr. Sandra Matsui is recognized as a Pillar of the Profession
  • Creation of national committees and network socials
  • Recognition of new doctorates and promotions within the KC
2004 - Denver
  • Christine Quemuel & Dr. Julie Wong serve as Co-chairs
  • Dr. Amy Agbayani receives the Shattering the Glass Ceiling Award
  • Regional Representatives were appointed.
  • Henry Gee is recognized as Pillar of the Profession
  • Dr. Hal Gin begins a 6-year term on the NASPA Foundation Board of Directors.
  • Dr. Evette Castillo and Fabian DeRozario appointed next co-chairs
2005 - Tampa
  • Dr. Evette Castillo and Fabian DeRozario officially take over as co-chairs; established and set goals of expanding the roles of the leadership team, increase the engagement of mid- and senior-level professionals within the API KC, create and disseminate knowledge of the API community within higher education, and create closer connections with regions.
  • Mike Segawa receives the Shattering the Glass Ceiling Award
  • Henry Gee and Alvin Tagomori are recognized as Pillars of the Profession
  • A regular API KC Newsletter is created
  • VIP (Very Involved Participant) Award established; Daniel Choi and Dawn Lee are the first recipients.
  • Research and Scholarship Committee established
2006 - Washington, DC
  • Dr. Evette Castillo and Fabian DeRozario serve as co-chairs
  • Dr. Luoluo Hong receives the Shattering the Glass Ceiling Award
  • Dr. Lori Ideta and Joy Hoffman receive the VIP Awards
  • Dr. Doris Ching retires from University of Hawai’i
  • There is a noted need to get APIDA professionals involved in NASPA at national level outside of API KC.
  • Dr. Lori Ideta and Joy Hoffman appointed incoming co-chairs
2007 - Orlando
  • Dr. Lori Ideta and Joy Hoffman officially take over as co-chairs; set national goals and priorities of revising the API KC’s mentorship program, clarifying the objectives and job descriptions for national committees, increasing communication with regional representatives, creating new leadership positions within the API KC, bridging relationships between the API KC and other related organizations such as ACPA’s APAN, and revising and improving the national award recognition process.
  • Joint conference with ACPA; API KC collaborates with ACPA’s APAN to create joint marketing materials and receives recognition from NASPA national leadership for their efforts.
  • APAN and API KC collaborate on the first annual APPEX—Asians and Pacific Islanders Promoting Educational eXcellence Pre-Conference Workshop. Focus is on identity and upward mobility for APIDAs in student affairs and higher education. The APPEX planning committee is comprised of Dr. Julie Wong (Founding Chair), Michael Paul Wong, Dr. Evette Castillo Clark, Dr. Jean Kim, Daniel Choi, Christina Yao, Rebecca Nelson, and Sunny Park Suh, representing both NASPA and ACPA.
  • Dr. Julie Wong receives the Shattering the Glass Ceiling Award
  • Camaron Miyamoto and Hikaru Kozuma receive the VIP Awards
  • KCs go to an elections process to select national co-chairs.
  • Discussion initiates nationally about the inclusion of South Asians in the API KC with colleagues in APAN and APINCORE
2008 - Boston
  • Dr. Lori Ideta and Joy Hoffman serve as Co-Chairs
  • Mike Segawa wins a national election to become the second API President of NASPA.
  • Hikaru Kozuma and Karlen Suga are announced as the API KC’s first set of nationally elected co-chairs.
  • Outstanding Mentoring Award established; Henry Gee is named the inaugural recipient.
  • Dr. Hal Gin receives the Shattering the Glass Ceiling Award
  • Faith Kazmi and Karlen Suga receive the VIP Awards
  • APPEX is launched for its 2nd year
2009 - Seattle
  • Hikaru Kozuma and Karlen Suga officially take over as co-chairs. Established national priorities and goals of collaborating with organizations outside of NASPA, engaging regional reps on a consistent and regular basis, increasing NUFP involvement, South Asian inclusion, and communicating more actively with the general API KC membership.
  • Shattering the Glass Ceiling Award renamed the Doris Michiko Ching Shattering the Glass Ceiling Award; Jim Larimore is named the recipient. 
  • Outstanding Mentoring Award renamed the Henry Gee Outstanding Mentoring Award; Dr. Anna Gonzalez is named the recipient.
  • Denise Fung and Raja Bhattar receive the VIP Awards
  • APPEX is launched for its 3rd year
  • Local Arrangements Committee is created
2010 - Chicago
  • Hikaru Kozuma and Karlen Suga serve as Co-Chairs
  • Dr. Judy Sakaki receives the Doris Michiko Ching Shattering the Glass Ceiling Award
  • Dr. Connie Tingson-Gatuz receives the Henry Gee Outstanding Mentoring Award
  • Dr. Mamta Accapadi and Nicole Virtucio receive the VIP Awards
  • Dr. Howard Wang is recognized as a Pillar of the Profession
  • Dr. Doris Ching is recognized as a NASPA Legacy Member by current NASPA President Mike Segawa
  • APPEX is launched for its 4th year
  • Raja Bhattar and JoeAnn Nguyen are announced as the second set of nationally elected API KC National Co-Chairs
2011 - Philadelphia
  • Raja Bhattar and JoeAnn Nguyen start the term as Co-Chairs
  • Dr. Christine Kajikawa Wilkinson receives the Doris Michiko Ching Shattering the Glass Ceiling Award
  • Dr. Joy Hoffman receives the Henry Gee Outstanding Mentoring Award
  • Lisa Hatfield and Tedd Vanadilok receive the VIP Awards
  • Dr. Henry Gee is announced as the Region VI Vice President to begin his term in 2012
  • APPEX is launched for its 5th year
2012 - Phoenix
  • Raja Bhattar and JoeAnn Nguyen serve as Co-Chairs
  • Dr. Audrey Yamagata-Noji receives the Doris Michiko Ching Shattering the Glass Ceiling Award
  • Shane Carlin receives the Henry Gee Outstanding Mentoring Award
  • Grace Bagunu and Bindi Patel receive the VIP Awards
  • APPEX is launched for its 6th year
  • Dr. Greg Toya and Dr. Daniel Choi appointed incoming Co-Chairs
2013 - Orlando
  • Dr. Greg Toya and Dr. Daniel Choi start the term as Co-Chairs
  • Mark Mitsui receives the Doris Michiko Ching Shattering the Glass Ceiling Award
  • Dr. Lori Ideta receives the Henry Gee Outstanding Mentoring Award
  • Cleda Wang and Kenny Importante receive the VIP Awards
  • APPEX is launched for its 7th year
2014 - Baltimore
  • Dr. Greg Toya and Dr. Daniel Choi serve as Co-Chairs
  • Jane Higa receives the Doris Michiko Ching Shattering the Glass Ceiling Award
  • Dr. Mamta Accapadi receives the Henry Gee Outstanding Mentoring Award
  • Dr. Liza Talusan and Tera Nakata receive the VIP Awards
  • Dr. Sumi Pendakur receives the Outstanding Mid-Level Professional Award
  • Dr. Dina Maramba receives the Distinguished Contribution to Research & Scholarship Award
  • Kristine Din receives the Rising Star Award
  • Aaron Parayno receives the Future Leader Award
  • APPEX is launched for its 8th year
  • Kevin Gin and Nicole Virtucio Moya appointed incoming Co-Chairs
2015 - New Orleans
  • Kevin Gin and Nicole Virtucio Moya serve as Co-Chairs
  • Dr. Mamta Accapadi receives the Doris Michiko Ching Shattering the Glass Ceiling Award
  • Angela Rola receives the Henry Gee Outstanding Mentoring Award
  • Sue Ann Huang and Kristen Wong receive the Very Involved Participants Awards
  • Andi Sims receives the Outstanding Mid-Level Professional Award
  • Dr. Robert Teranishi receives the Distinguished Contribution to Research & Scholarship Award
  • Jude Paul Dizon receives the Rising Star Award
  • Trina Tran receives the Future Leader Award
  • APPEX is launched for its 9th year
2016 - Indianapolis
  • Kevin Gin and Nicole Virtucio Moya serve as Co-Chairs
  • Dr. Mamta Accapadi receives the Doris Michiko Ching Shattering the Glass Ceiling Award
  • Angela Rola receives the Henry Gee Outstanding Mentoring Award
  • Sue Ann Huang and Kristen Wong receive the Very Involved Participants Awards
  • Andi Sims receives the Outstanding Mid-Level Professional Award
  • Dr. Robert Teranishi receives the Distinguished Contribution to Research & Scholarship Award
  • Jude Paul Dizon receives the Rising Star Award
  • Trina Tran receives the Future Leader Award
  • APPEX is launched for its 9th year
2017 - San Antonio
  • Queena Hoang and Long Wu serve as Co-Chairs
  • Dr. Evette Castillo Clark receives the Dr. Doris Michiko Ching Shattering the Glass Ceiling Award
  • Dr. Linda Ahuna-Hamill receives the Henry Gee Outstanding Mentoring Award
  • Kristine Bacani & Joi Thailoan Torres receive the Very Involved Participants Awards
  • Dr. Daniel Choi receives the Outstanding Mid-Level Professional Award
  • Dr. Samuel Maseus receives the Distinguished Contribution to Research & Scholarship Award
  • Natasia Bongcas receives the Rising Star Award
  • Brenda Dao receives the Future Leader Award
  • APPEX is launched for its 10th year
2018 - Philadelphia
  • Queena Hoang & Long Wu serve as Co-Chairs
  • Dr. Ajay Nair receives the Dr. Doris Michiko Ching Shattering the Glass Ceiling Award
  • Dr. Christine Quemuel receives the Henry Gee Outstanding Mentoring Award
  • Melissa Camba-Kelsay & Susan Liu (Huynh) receive the Very Involved Participants Awards
  • Dr. Delia Cheung Hom receives the Outstanding Mid-Level Professional Award
  • Dr. Tracy Poon Tambascia receives the Distinguished Contribution to Research & Scholarship Award
  • Peter Satugarn Limthongviratn receives the Rising Star Award
  • Varaxy Yi & Joren Plunkett receives the Future Leader Award
  • APPEX is launched for its 11th year.
2019 - Los Angeles
  • To be announced

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Signature Initiatives

THE APIKC LEGACY PROJECT

"Celebrating the Legacy, Nurturing the Movement"

In keeping with the 2010 NASPA National Conference theme of “Live the Legacy Be the Movement,” the Asian Pacific Islander Knowledge Community (APIKC), on the suggestion of founding member Henry Gee, took on the task of documenting the history and evolution of the KC as it stands today. To complete this task, interviews of founding members, active members, and former co-chairs were conducted. The end result of these interviews is represented in two ways. One is a timeline that highlights significant events in the APIKC’s history. The other is the following narrative centered around the themes of the responses from the interviews conducted. Special thanks to Kevin Gin, Danielle Howard, Rouel Velasco, Hikaru Kozuma, and Karlen Suga for conducting the interviews and to Dr. Doris Ching, Dr. Evette Castillo-Clark, Shane Carlin, Henry Gee, Dr. Hal Gin, Dr. Anna Gonzalez, Joy Hoffman, Dr. Lori Ideta, Sunny Lee, Christine Quemuel, Dr. Julie Wong, and the National Student Affairs Archives at Bowling Green for their contributions to this project. Another heartfelt thank you goes to all of those who have had a hand in and who continue to shape the API KC into the vibrant and special community it is today. Your dedication to the Student Affairs Profession and the Asian Pacific Islander and Desi American (APIDA) Community in higher education serves as an inspiration to all.

Growth

A major theme of all of the interviews conducted was growth. Founding members such as Dr. Doris Ching, Dr. Hal Gin, and Henry Gee were all involved in NASPA before “minority groups” such as African Americans and Latinos formally began getting together and were eventually organized into Network for Educational Equity & Ethnic Diversity (NEEED) in 1988. Henry himself attended the first NEEED meeting and was the only non African American or Latino professional present. He later served as the national Chair of NEEED. As time passed, NEEED evolved into separate networks and finally into Knowledge Communities, which now encompasses a variety of functional areas and identity-based groups. Sunny Lee, who served as the co-chair of what was then the API Collective and eventually the API Network from 2000-2003, and Shane Carlin, one of the APIKC’s first members, recalled times where gatherings for the community attracted 15-20 members. By contrast, a networking lunch at the 2009 NASPA National Conference in Seattle attracted upwards of 50 members.

While the APIKC has grown in critical mass and numbers, another aspect of growth has been seen in individual KC members. Christine Quemuel, who served as a national co-chair of the APIKC from 2003-2005, noted how exciting it has been to see up and coming members of the KC receive promotions, earn graduate degrees, and move on to leadership positions within NASPA and other organizations. One of the most recent examples of an APIKC leader who has moved on to a national role is former National co-chair Dr. Evette Castillo-Clark, who is now serving NASPA as National Director-Elect of all Knowledge Communities.

Connections

Many of the former chairs and founding members identified “making connections” as being a central part of the APIKC’s development over the years. Dr. Anna Gonzalez, one of the API KC’s first co-chairs recalled in her interview that she and her co-chair, Sunny Lee, made it a special point to invite folks to join the API KC who were involved in NASPA before the formal API group was formed. Social events planned by the APIKC at national and regional levels are highly anticipated and play an important role in facilitating those connections.

In addition, facilitating connections was a common theme of the goals set by national c-chairs. Joy Hoffman and Dr. Lori Ideta served as national co-chairs from 2007-2009 and sought to establish strong connections with similar APIDA related organizations such as the Asian Pacific American Network in the Association of College Personnel Administrators (ACPA). Dr. Evette Casillo-Clark and Fabian DeRozario (2005-2007) worked to create closer connections with the Regions in NASPA through regional representatives and were successful in maintaining a full slate of them throughout their term.

Engagement

A common goal set by all of the former National Co-Chairs of the APIKC was that of engagement. For some co-chairs, it came in the way of establishing committees and appointing leaders for them who came from varying levels of experience in the profession. That particular strategy was employed by Christine Quemuel and Dr. Julie Wong, who served as National Co-Chairs from 2003-2005.

A hallmark of the APIKC experience as identified by founding member Henry Gee and others who were interviewed is the active and continued involvement and engagement of Senior Student Affairs Officers (SSAO) in the community. The connections made through the interactions between SSAOs and new professionals, graduate, and undergraduate students have often resulted in mentoring relationships that transcend functional areas and regions.

Over the years, both new and seasoned administrators have gotten involved in the KC and engaged on the multitude of issues concerning APIDA students and adminstrators. Through work on the leadership team as committee members or regional representatives, or participation on planning committees for pre-conference sessions, or sponsorship of workshops and sessions centered on APIDA issues at the National Conferences, the APIKC and its members has increased the level of thoughtful engagement around these topics.

Collaborations

In many ways, the APIKC in its present day began as a result of collaboration. NEEED, which led to the formation of Networks and eventually Knowledge Communities, was a collaboration between minority ethnic groups within NASPA. In addition, the former APIKC co-chairs who were interviewed spoke of collaborating with groups within and outside of NASPA as being a part of their terms. Most recently, the APIKC collaborated with ACPA’s APAN and the National Conference on Race and Ethnicity’s API group APINCORE to address the issue of South Asian Inclusion within higher education and in their respective organizations.>

Communication

Former national co-chairs who were interviewed cited communication as both an important goal and challenge. Dr. Evette Castillo-Clark noted that the lack of communication between regions and the National Knowledge Communities became such a huge area of concern, that regional knowledge community chairs were established. Joy Hoffman and Dr. Lori Ideta continued to work toward establishing communication lines between the national APIKC and regional chairs during their term.

Ways the APIKC has increased overall communication with its members over the years include the development of a regular newsletter, an increased web presence, and now the incorporation of social media to assist in helping members feel connected outside of the annual conference.

Generation of Knowledge

One vehicle of increasing the visibility of the APIDA community within higher education is the generation and creation of knowledge. As such, leaders of the APIKC have worked to increase the number of keynote speakers who identify as APIDA at national and regional conferences. In addition, a major push is made every year to increase and recognize the number of educational sessions presented at national and regional conferences. During Dr. Evette Castillo-Clark and Fabian DeRozario’s term, the Research and Scholarship Committee was established to provide coordination and structure to those efforts. A regular column called Knowledge Nuggets was created in the newsletter with the goal of encouraging members to think about current issues related to the APIDA community in higher education and still exists today.

Mentoring

The concept of mentoring is key in the APIDA community’s cultural contexts and in the greater Student Affairs professional community, and it is also an area highly celebrated by the APIKC. Founding members and former co-chairs of the APIKC spoke warmly in their interviews about the mentors who assisted them in pursuing the Student Affairs profession and note their strong desire to “pay it forward.” Mentoring is such an integral and recognized part of the APIKC, that an annual award recognizing efforts in this area was established in 2008 and later named after founding member and celebrated mentor, Henry Gee. Of special note is Dr. Anna Gonzalez, former APIKC Chair and Co-Chair, who leads one of the most celebrated mentoring activities in NASPA, the NASPA Undergraduate Fellows Program.

Sense of ‘ohana (Family) and Community

One of the functions of NASPA’s Knowledge Communities is to assist members in feeling connected to the bigger NASPA organization through smaller, more specific communities. The value of community is one that is also highly celebrated within the APIKC. From its beginnings, the APIKC has sought provide a welcoming environment for its members. Christine Quemuel cited the term sense of ‘ohana, which in Hawaiian means family, as a goal she and her co-chair Dr. Julie Wong sought to achieve during their terms. She spoke about having an APIKC option for each meal at the conference so folks had many options to establish connections with one another and build a sense of community. This was a continuation of the efforts of Dr. Anna Gonzalez and Sunny Lee, who recognized the importance of inter-generational connections and worked to help facilitate them during their terms.

Now, many members view the APIKC as an ‘ohana—one they look forward to connecting with each year at the NASPA National Conference and through other forms of communication.

Visibility and Advocacy

By all accounts, the impetus for the creation of NEEED, Knowledge Communities, and the APIKC itself stemmed from the need for advocacy and visibility. Dr. Doris Ching recalled being approached by a group of young API professionals in the late 1990s who felt isolated and discriminated against on their campus and expressed a need for support and mentoring.

A key way the APIKC has increased the visibility of APIDA professionals in higher education is through encouraging the selection of APIDA speakers for national and regional conferences. This movement was started by Dr. Amy Agbayani of the University of Hawai’i at Mānoa in the late 1990s. Her desire to see more APIDA conference speakers resulted in icons such as Helen Zia and Dr. Gwendolyn Mink, daughter of the late Congresswoman Patsy Mink, being invited to serve as featured speakers at NASPA National Conferences.

While the APIKC continues its advocacy within higher education, efforts have not been limited to the APIDA community. During Joy Hoffman and Dr. Lori Ideta’s term, a labor dispute occurred in the hotel that was slated to host the 2007 Western Regional Conference in San Francisco. Upon hearing of the dispute, the APIKC and Latino/a Knowledge Community worked advocate that policies be created to ensure disputes like these were taken into account when considering future conference venues.

Just the Beginning

The APIKC has had a rich history--one that truly represents the dedication and passion of its diverse membership. While it is important to celebrate history, it is equally important for future leaders to continue the movement that has become the APIKC’s legacy.


APPEX

APPEX is an interactive summit designed to address the professional/leadership development of Asian American/Pacific Islander (API) student affairs professionals in a multi-culturally competent and holistic context. Through in-depth interactions among the participants and facilitators, the seventh annual pre-conference will focus on facilitating a career pipeline for Asian American/Pacific Islander graduate students, new and mid-level professionals by providing tools to guide their pathways and transitions. The program will also address current API issues related to leadership development, intersections of identities, and career growth.

APPEX is held each year at the NASPA Annual Conference as a full day pre-conference workshop. For more information about the program, please contact the API KC National Co-Chairs.


E-MENTORING PROGRAM

The NASPA APIKC E-Mentoring Program connects Asian/Asian American and Pacific Islander student affairs professionals with mentors and mentees who can build one-on-one relationships across the boundaries of geography.

As API professionals, we need to support and expand the pipeline of graduate students and new professionals, nurture the development of mid-level professionals, and support our trailblazers in upper-level administration. Through the E-Mentoring Program, our goal is to strengthen the API student affairs community by fostering personal relationships amongst colleagues.

Long-Term Mentoring

This three-tiered mentoring program will pair mid-level professionals to mentor graduate students and new professionals, pair senior-level professionals to mentor mid-level professionals, and pair senior-level administrators with other senior-level administrators to provide collegial mentoring.

Once a mentor and mentee has been identified, the pair is encouraged to meet-up within a month, and introduce themselves in person or via online video conferencing (i.e. Skype). It is encouraged that the mentor and mentee communicate more frequently at the beginning (perhaps once a month). The two of you will determine how you chose to develop and utilize your mentoring relationship. The E-Mentoring Program will periodically send updates, discussion topics and activities to encourage dialogue and interactions between mentor and mentee.

If you would like more information or would like to sign up to be a mentor or mentee, please contact the E-Mentoring Program Coordinator.

Drop-In Mentoring

This option provides individuals with the opportunity to ask a quick question or to seek advice from a seasoned professional or expert. A list of mentors and their profiles are available for individuals to review and find the appropriate person to contact. Drop-in mentoring can be seen as a non-committal one-time mentoring session or an opportunity to develop a long-term mentoring relationship. It has a different sign-up process:

  1. Look at the list of available mentors and their profiles. Find someone that may have the expertise or experience to answer your question(s).
  2. Send an email to the individual with your specific question(s). Make sure you introduce yourself and identify yourself as part of APIKC, and that you got their contact through the E-Mentoring Program.
  3. The mentor will respond within 72 hours with a answer to your question or to set-up a meeting to have more dialogue.

If you would like more information or would like to sign up to be a mentor, please contact the E-Mentoring Program Coordinator.

Awards

Resources

Career Development Tips from the API Community

We thought it would be most useful to share the stories of colleagues, lessons learned, and valuable insight.

"Communicating Your Uniqueness" from Dr. Doris Ching

I believe a job interview, at times, is like a media interview in the sense that one is putting his or her best image forward. In that light, the following suggestion by a marketing consultant may be helpful: Identify 2 or 3 of your "must airs;" that is, the 2 or 3 things you feel are very important for the interviewer to know about you, and find ways to incorporate them into your responses to the interviewer's questions. Needless to say, they should be incorporated in as natural and relevant a manner as possible to the question. Many interviewers, near the end of the interview, ask if the candidate wishes to add anything or ask any question. However, some don't, so it's safer not to assume that such an opportunity will be presented at the end, and find ways to include those "must airs" in your responses to the interviewers' questions.

"Career Tips" from Dr. Tae-Sun Kim

I obsessed over the cover letter more so than the CV because I knew it was in the cover letter that the readers would sense my passion, personality, and potential. I highlighted key words, phrases, mission statements, goals and key indicators of the type of person or outcomes these posts were looking for and I integrated them into the letter. I checked out the larger division and campus website to get clues about the direction or values of the department I would be working for and again, talked about those items in my letter. The cover letter writing process also helped me decide whether or not this particular institution or city/town was a place I wanted to live and work.

Consider packing for your on-campus interview using a carry-on bag. The last thing you want is for the airline to lose your luggage not have appropriate interview attire.

When asked the dreaded, “What are your weaknesses?” question, I reframed it to, “One of the things that I am challenged with, but am working to correct is...” I wanted the group to know that I am a learner and I evolve; I am not threatened by change or the need to develop new competencies.

"Interview Tips" from Dr. Lori Ideta

Never go to the interview empty handed. Go with something in your hands: a briefcase, a portfolio, a pen, a tablet, something! You should have a copy of your application and resume, the job ad, print outs of the institution's mission statement, etc. This demonstrates your preparedness and interest in the job.

At the end of any interview, the interviewers will give you an opportunity to ask questions. Always ask something! In our cultural contexts, we are trained to not ask questions lest we appear too confident. Well, in an interview setting in higher education, if you do not ask any questions, it appears that you are not really interested in the position. Here are some sample questions you can use at the end of any interview:

  • What qualities are you seeking in an ideal candidate?
  • What is a typical day like for the position?
  • Tell me why you love working at this institution/office/department.
  • What are the next steps in this search process?”

Write down your questions ahead of time, so when it is your turn to ask them, you can easily refer to them

"An Interview Story" from Karlen Suga

The biggest thing that stands out in my mind about interviewing and job searching with regard to culture is the subject of humility. During an open forum interview for a job here, I was asked the question, "Why do you think you are the best person for this job?" For my entire life, I was taught by my parents and grandparents to always remain humble… My response to that question mirrored this value of humility, and I basically said, “Truthfully, I don't know that I am the best person for the job” because in my head, I had no idea what other qualifications other candidates brought to the table and I didn't want to make the assumption that I was the best. I knew I had a lot to offer the position and office, but didn't want it to seem as if I was bragging because of my need to demonstrate humility. Unfortunately, my answer was taken and interpreted that I was not confident in my own abilities. I did not get the job. Based on that experience, by biggest piece of advice to APA folks that may be interviewing is to be aware that this question may come up. If you value humility the way I do, find a way to answer the question in a way that still communicates that you are confident about yourself and your abilities. My advisor suggested that the next time I encounter that question, I say something to the effect of, "Well culturally, this is a difficult question for me because I have been taught to remain humble. However, I do believe that I bring (insert qualities) to the position and that is why I would make a great fit."

"Lessons Learned from APPEX" from Henry Gee, Rebecca Nelson, and Dr. LuoLuo Hong (as noted by Dr. Evette Castillo Clark)
  • Vertical mobility is not necessarily the way to ‘lead’; we lead best by being comfortable in our current roles and finding that place where we have voice.
  • “Don’t mistake activity for accomplishment.”
  • “Don’t spend time with people who don’t care about you.”
  • “See the invisible; Hear the unspoken.”
  • “Know what is value-critical for you, like a division knows what is mission-critical.”
  • “Work smarter, not harder.”
  • “There are bridges that can be burned that are irrevocable.”
  • “Your lateral relationships are safe spaces.”
  • “Find the context where you’re comfortable to be political.”
  • “You must accept politics to be a political actor.”
  • “You will find that successfully navigating the political landscape is less about what you do, it’s more about your relationships with others and how you treat people.”
  • “…that it is just as important, if not more, to take time to sit and reflect about the people, structures, systems, styles, cultures, values, relationships, and mission that make up your campus community as it is to produce results and do the work that you were hired to do.”
Research on APIs in Higher Education

The following list of resources is a perpetual work in progress. If you know of additional resources (e.g., journal articles, monographs, books, videos, websites) relevant to API college student development or API professionals in higher education, please email Research & Scholarship Committee Co-Chairs.

The API Community Experience
  • National Commission on Asian American and Pacific Islander Research in Education (2008). Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders: Facts, not fiction: Setting the record straight. New York: The College Board.
  • Park, C., & Mei-Ying, M. (1999). Asian American education: Prospects and challenges. Connecticut: Greenwood Publishing Group.
  • Perea, J. (2000).The Black/White binary paradigm of race. In R. Delgado & J. Stefancic (Eds.), Critical race theory: The cutting edge (pp. 344-353). Philadelphia: Temple University Press.
  • Sau-Fong, S. (1996). Questions and answers: What research says about the education of Chinese American children. Baltimore.
  • Teranishi, R. (2003). Asian American Pacific Islanders and critical race theory: An examination of school racial climate. Equity and Excellence in Education, 35(2), 144–154.
  • Teranishi, R. (2007). Race, ethnicity, and higher education policy: The use of critical quantitative research. New Directions for Institutional Research, 133, 37-49.
  • Trueba, H.T. (1993). Myth or Reality: Adaptive Strategies of Asian Americans in California. Pennsylvania: Falmer Press, Taylor and Francis Inc.
THE ETHNIC COMMUNITY EXPERIENCE
  • Chhuon, V., & Hudley, C. (2008). Factors supporting Cambodian American students’ successful adjustment into the university. Journal of College Student Development, 49, 15-30.
  • Chhuon, V., Hudley, C., & Macia, R. (2006). Cambodian-American college students: Cultural values and multiple worlds. Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the American Educational Research Association (AERA).
  • Lee, S. J. (1997). The road to college: Hmong American women’s pursuit of higher education. Harvard Educational Review, 67, 803-827.
  • Museus, S. D., & Maramba, D. C. (2011). The impact of culture on Filipino American students’ sense of belonging. The Review of Higher Education, 34(2), 231-258.
  • Nguyen-Hong-Nhiem, L. & Halpern, J. M. (Eds.) (1989). The Far East comes near: Autobiographical accounts of Southeast Asian students in America. Amherst, MA: The University of Massachusetts Press.
  • Su, J., Lee, R. M., & Vang, S. (2005). Intergenerational family conflict and coping among Hmong American college students. Journal of Counseling Psychology, 4, 482–489.
  • Um, K. (2003). A dream denied: Educational experiences of Southeast Asian American youth, Issues and recommendations. Washington, D.C.: Southeast Asia Resource Action Center (SEARAC).
Diversity/Demographics/Campus Climate
  • Guiffrida, D. A., Kiyama, J. M., Waterman, S., & Museus, S. D. (2012). Moving from individual to collective cultures to serve students of color. In S. D. Museus & U. M. Jayakumar (Eds.). Creating campus cultures: Fostering success among racially diverse student populations. New York: Routledge.
  • Hune, S. (2002). Demographics and diversity of Asian American college students. In M. K. McEwen, C. M. Kodama, A. N. Alvarez, S. Lee & C. T. H. Liang (Eds.), Working with Asian American college students (pp. 11-20). New Directions for Student Services, no. 97. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.
  • Hurtado, S., Milem, J., Clayton-Pederson, A., & Allen, W. (1999). Enacting diverse learning environments: Improving the climate for racial/ethnic diversity in higher education. ASHE-ERIC Higher Education Report, Volume 26, No. 8. Washington D.C.: The George Washington University, Graduate School of Education and Human Development.
  • Loo, C. M. & Rolison, G. (1986). Alienation of ethnic minority students at a predominatly White university. Journal of Higher Education, 57(1), 58-77.
  • Museus, S. D., Lam, S., Huang, C., Kem, P., & Tan, K. (2012). Cultural integration in campus subcultures: Where the cultural, academic, and social spheres of college life collide. In S. D. Museus & U. M. Jayakumar (Eds.). Creating campus cultures: Fostering success among racially diverse student populations. New York: Routledge.
  • National Commission on Asian American and Pacific Islander Research in Education & The College Board. (2008). Asian American and Pacific Islanders: Fact, Not Fiction: Setting the Record Straight. New York: Authors.
API Student Development
  • Kodama, C. M., McEwen, M. K., Liang, C. T. H., & Lee, S. (2002). An Asian American perspective on psychosocial student development theory. In M. K. McEwen, C. M. Kodama, A. N. Alvarez, S. Lee & C. T. H. Liang (Eds.), Working with Asian American college students (pp. 45-59). New Directions for Student Services, no. 97. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.
  • Kotori, C. , Malaney, G. D. (2002). Asian American students’ perceptions of racism, reporting behaviors, and awareness of legal rights and procedures. NASPA Journal, 40(3), 56-76.
  • Liang, C. T. H., & Sedlacek, W. (2002). Attitudes of White student services practitioners toward Asian Americans. NASPA Journal, 40(3), 30-42.
  • Liang, C. T. H. & Sedlacek, W. E. (2003). Utilizing factor analysis to understand the needs of Asian American students. Journal of College Student Development, 44, 260-266.
  • McEwen, M. K., Kodama, C. M., Alvarez, A. N., Lee, S., & Liang, C. T. H. (Eds.). (2002). Working with Asian American college students (New Directions for Student Services, no. 97). San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.
  • Museus, S. D. (2011). Asian American Millennials college in context: Living at the Intersection of diversification, digitization, and globalization. In F. Bonner & V. Lechuga (Eds.), Diverse millennial students in college: Implications for faculty and student affairs (pp. 69-88). Sterling, VA: Stylus.
  • Ngo, B. (2006). Learning from the margins: The education of Southeast and South Asian Americans in context. Race, Ethnicity, and Education, 9(1), 51-65.
Racial/Ethnic Identity Development
  • Alvarez, A. N. (2002). Racial identity and Asian Americans: Supports and challenges. In M. K. McEwen, C. M. Kodama, A. N. Alvarez, S. Lee & C. T. H. Liang (Eds.), Working with Asian American college students (pp. 33-43). New Directions for Students Services, no. 97. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.
  • Alvarez, A. N., & Helms, J. E. (2001). Racial identity and reflected appraisals as influences on Asian Americans' racial adjustment. Cultural Diversity and Ethnic Minority Psychology, 7, 217-231.
  • Chen, G. A. (2005). The complexity of "Asian American identity": The intersection of multiple social identities. Unpublished doctoral dissertation, The University of Texas, Austin, TX.
  • Doshi, S. (1996). Divided consciousness amidst a new orientalism: South Asian American identity formation on campus. From S. Maira & R. Srikanth (Eds.), Contours of the heart: South Asians map North America (pp. 201-213). New York: Asian American Writers’ Workshop.
  • Espiritu, Y. (1992). Asian American panethnicity: Bridging institutions and identities. Philadelphia: Temple University Press.
  • Gim Chung, R. H. (2001). Gender, ethnicity, and acculturation in intergenerational conflict of Asian American college students. Cultural Diversity and Ethnic Minority Psychology, 7, 376-386.
  • Gupta, A. (1998). At the crossroads: College activism and its impact on Asian American identity formation. From L. D. Shankar & R. Srikanth (Eds.), A part, yet apart: South Asians in Asian America (pp. 127-145). Philadelphia: Temple University Press.
  • Ibrahim, F., Ohnishi, H., Sandhu, D. S. (1997). Asian American identity development: A culture specific model for South Asian Americans. Journal of Multicultural Counseling and Development, 25, 34-50.
  • Kawaguchi, S. (2002). Ethnic identity development and collegiate experience of Asian Pacific American students: Implications for practice. NASPA Journal, 40(3), 13-29.
  • Kerwin, C. & Ponterotto , J.G. (1995). Biracial identity development: Theory and research. In J.G. Ponterotto, J.M. Casas, L.A. Suzuki, & C.M. Alexander (Eds.), Handbook for multicultural counseling (2nd ed., pp. 199-217). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications.
  • Kibria, N. (1999). College and notions of "Asian American": Second-generation Chinese and Korean Americans negotiate race and identity. Amerasia Journal, 25, 29-51.
  • Kich, G.K. (1992). The developmental process of asserting a biracial, bicultural identity. In M.P.P. Root (Ed.), Racially mixed people in America (pp. 304-317). Newbury Park, CA: Sage Publications.
  • Kim, J. (2001). Asian American identity development theory. In C. L. Wijeyesinghe & B. W. Jackson III (Eds.), New perspectives on racial identity development: A theoretical and practical anthology (pp. 67-90). New York: New York University Press.
  • Maira, S. (2004).Youth culture, citizenship, and globalization: South Asian Muslim youth in the United States after September 11th. Comparative Studies of South Asia, Africa, and the Middle East, 24, 219-231.
  • Nishimura, N.J. (1998). Assessing the issues of multiracial students on college campuses. Journal of College Counseling, 1, 45-53.
  • Poston, W. S. C. (1990). The biracial identity development model: A needed addition. Journal of Counseling and Development, 69, 152-155.
  • Renn, K.A. (2000). Patterns of situational identity among biracial and multiracial college students. The Review of Higher Education, 23, 399-420.
  • Renn, K.A. (2003). Understanding the identities of mixed-race college students through a developmental ecology lens. Journal of College Student Development, 44, 383-403.
  • Rhoads, R. A., Lee, J. J., Yamada, M. (2002). Panethnicity and collective action among Asian American students: A qualitative case study. Journal of College Student Development, 43, 876-891.
  • Root, M.P.P. (1996). The multiracial experience: Racial borders as a significant frontier in race relations. In M.P.P. Root (Ed.), The multiracial experience: Racial borders as the new frontier (xiii – xxviii). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications.
  • Standen, B. C. S. (1996). Without a template: The biracial Korean/White experience. In M. P. P. Root (Ed.), The multiracial experience: Racial borders as the new frontier (pp. 245-259). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications.
  • Wijeyesinghe, C. L. (2001). Racial identity in multiracial people: An alternative paradigm. In C. L. Wijeyesinghe & B. W. Jackson III (Eds.), New perspectives on racial identity development: A theoretical and practical anthology (pp. 129-152). New York: New York University Press.
Gender and Sexuality Among APIs
  • Chan, J. W. (1998). Contemporary Asian American men's issues. In L. R. Hirabayashi (Ed.), Teaching Asian America: Diversity and the problem of community (pp. 93-102). Lanham, MD: Rowman & Littlefield.
  • Espiritu, Y. L. (1997). Asian American Pacific Islander women and men: Labor, laws, and love. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications.
  • Hune, S. (1998). Asian Pacific American women in higher education: Claiming visibility and voice. Washington, D.C.: Association of American Colleges and Universities.
  • Hune, S. (1997). Higher education as gendered space: Asian American women and everyday inequities. In C. R. Ronai, B. A. Zsembik, & J. R. Feagin (Eds.), Everyday sexism in the third millennium. (pp.181-196). New York: Routledge.
  • Kumashiro, K. K. (1999). Supplementing normalcy and otherness: Queer Asian American men reflect on stereotypes, identity, and oppression. Qualitative Studies in Education, 12, 491-508.
  • Liu, W. M. (2002). Exploring the lives of Asian American men: Racial identity, male role norms, gender role conflict, and prejudicial attitudes. Psychology of Men and Masculinity, 3, 107-118.
  • Liu, W. M. & Iwamoto, D. K. (2006). Asian American men’s gender role conflict: The role of Asian values, self-esteem, and psychological distress. Psychology of Men & Masculinity, 7(3), 153-164.
API Student Involvement
  • Accapadi, M. M. (2005). Affirmations of identity: The story of a South Asian American sorority. Unpublished doctoral dissertation, The University of Texas, Austin, TX.
  • Inkelas, K. K. (2004). Does participation in ethnic cocurricular activities facilitate a sense of ethnic awareness and understanding? A study of Asian Pacific American undergraduates. Journal of College Student Development, 45, 285-302.
  • Kimbrough, W. (2002, January 22). Guess who's coming to campus: The growth of Black, Latin, and Asian fraternal organizations. NetResults.
  • Museus, S. D. (2008). The role of ethnic student organizations in fostering African American and Asian American students' cultural adjustment and membership at predominantly White institutions. Journal of College Student Development, 49, 568-586.
  • Park, J. (2008). Race and the Greek system in the 21st century: Centering the voices of Asian American women. NASPA Journal, 45(1), 103-132.
API Leadership
  • Balón, D. G. (2003). Asian Pacific American leadership development. Leadership Insights and Applications Series #14. College Park, MD: National Clearinghouse for Leadership Programs.
  • Balón, D. G. (2004). Racial, ethnic, and gender differences among entering college student attitudes toward leadership, culture, and leader self-identification: A focus on Asian Pacific Americans. Unpublished doctoral dissertation, University of Maryland, College Park, MD.
  • Balón, D. G. (2005, April 26). Asian Pacific American college students on leadership: Culturally marginalized from the leader role? National Association of Student Personnel Administrators (NASPA) NetResults.
  • Liang (Eds.), Working with Asian American college students. (New Directions for Student Services, No. 97, pp. 81-89). San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.
  • Liang, C. T. H., Lee, S., Ting, M. P. (2002). Developing Asian American leaders. In M. K. McEwen, C. M. Kodama, A. N. Alvarez, S. Lee, & C. T. H.
  • Lin, M. H. (2007). Asian American leadership development: Examining the impact of collegiate environments and personal goals. Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Association for the Study of Higher Education, Louisville, KY.
  • Liu, W. M., & Sedlacek, W. E. (1999). Differences in leadership and cocurricular perception among entering male and female Asian Pacific American college students. Journal of Freshman Year Experience, 11(2), 93-114.\
Academics and Model Minority Myth
  • Chang, Mitchell J., Julie J. Park, Monica H. Lin, Oiyan A. Poon, and Don T. Nakanishi. Beyond Myths: The Growth and Diversity of Asian American College Freshmen: 1971-2005. UCLA: Higher Education Research Institute, 2007.
  • Chou, R. S. & Feagin, J. R. (2008). The myth of the model minority: Asian Americans facing racism. Boulder, CO.: Paradigm Publishers.
  • Inkelas, K. K. (2003). Caught in the middle: Understanding Asian Pacific American perspectives on affirmative action through Blumeris group position theory. Journal of College Student Development, 44, 625-643.
  • Inkelas, K. K. (2003). Diversity’s missing minority: Asian Pacific American undergraduates' attitudes toward affirmative action. The Journal of Higher Education, 74, 601-639.
  • Inkelas, K. K. (2006). Racial attitudes and Asian Pacific Americans: Demystifying the model minority. New York: Routledge.
  • Kodama, A. N. Alvarez, S. Lee & C. T. H. Liang (Eds.), Working with Asian American college students (pp. 21-32). New Directions for Student Services, no. 97. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.
  • Lee, S. J. (1996). Unraveling the “model minority” stereotype: Listening to Asian American youth. New York: Teachers College Press.
  • Lee, S. S. (2006). Over-represented and de-minoritized: The racialization of Asian Americans in higher education. InterActions: UCLA Journal of Education and Information Studies, 2(2), Article 4. Retrieved from http://repositories.cdlib.org/gseis/interactions/vol2/iss2/art4
  • Lew, Jonathan, June Chang, and Winnie Wang. (2005). "The Overlooked Minority. Asian Pacific American Students at Community Colleges." Community College Review 33, 64-84.
  • Museus, S. D. (2008). The model minority and the inferior minority myths: Understanding stereotypes and their implications for student involvement. About Campus, 13(3), 2-8.
  • Museus, S. D. (Ed.) (2009). Conducting research on Asian Americans in higher education: New Directions for Institutional Research (no. 142). San Francisco: Jossey-Bass. https://www.stanford.edu/group/cubberley/node/6899
  • Nakanishi, D. T. & Nishida, T. Y. (Eds.) (1994). The Asian American Pacific Islander educational experience: A source book for teachers and students. New York: Routledge.
  • Sue, S., & Okazaki, S. (1990). Asian-American educational achievements: A phenomenon in search of an explanation. American Psychologist, 45, 913-920.
  • Suzuki, B. H. (2002). Revisiting the model minority stereotype: Implications for student affairs practice and higher education. In M. K. McEwen, C. M.
  • Takagi, D.Y. (1992). The retreat from race: Asian-American admissions and racial politics. New Brunswick, New Jersey: Rutgers University Press.
  • Tan, D. (1994). Uniqueness of the Asian American experience in higher education. College Student Journal, 28, 412-421.
  • Ting, R. S. (2000). Predicting Asian Americans’ academic performance in the first year of college: An approach combining SAT scores and noncognitive variables. Journal of College Student Development, 41, 442-449.
  • To, D. L. (2008). Methodological issues in model minority research: Where do we go from here? In G. Li & L. Wang (Eds.), Model minority myth revisited (pp. 299-314). Charlotte, N.C.: Information Age Publishing, Inc.
API Student Persistence and Retention
  • Bennett, C. & Okinaka, A. M. (1990). Factors related to persistence among Asian, Black, Hispanic, and White undergraduates at a predominantly White university: Comparison between first and fourth year cohorts. The Urban Review, 22(1), 33-60.
  • Chan, S. & Wang. L. (1991). Racism and the model minority: Asian Americans in higher education. In Altbach, P. G. & Lomotey , K. (Eds.) The racial crisis in American higher education, (pp. 43-68). Albany, NY: State University of New York Press.
  • Gloria, A. M. & Ho, T. A. (2003). Environmental, social, and psychological experiences of Asian American undergraduates: Examining issues of academic persistence. Journal of Counseling & Development, 81, 93-105.
  • Kiang, P. (2005). A thematic analysis of persistence and long-term educational engagement with Southeast Asian American college students. Washington D.C.: Southeast Asian American Student Action and Visibility in Education (SAVE) Project.
  • Kiang, P. N. (1996). Persistence stories and survival strategies of Cambodian Americans in college. Journal of Narrative and Life History, 6(1), 39-64.
  • Museus, S. D. (2011). Mixing quantitative national survey data and qualitative interview data to understand college access and equity: An examination of first-generation Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders. In K. A. Griffin & S. D. Museus (Eds.). Using mixed-methods approaches to study intersectionality in higher education: New Directions for Institutional Research (no. 151, pp. 63-75). San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.
  • Nishimoto, J. K., & Hagedorn, L. S. (2003). Retention, persistence, and course taking patterns of Asian Pacific Americans attending urban community colleges. Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the American Educational Research Association.
  • Strage, A. (2000). Predictors of college adjustment and success: Similarities and difference among Southeast-Asian-American, Hispanic and White students. Education, 120, 731-740.
  • Yeh, T. L. (2002). Asian American college students who are educationally at risk. In M. K. McEwen, C. M. Kodama, A. N. Alvarez, S. Lee & C. T. H. Liang (Eds.), Working with Asian American college students (pp. 61-71). New Directions for Student Services, no. 97. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.
  • Yeh, T. L. (2005). Issues of college persistence Asian and Asian Pacific American students. Journal of College Student Retention, 6(1), 81-96.
API Student Mental Health
  • Cohen, E. (2007, May 16). Push to achieve tied to suicide in Asian-American women.

AAPI Faculty

Amy Li Ph.D.

Assistant Professor at University of Northern Colorado

Bach Mai Dolly Nguyen Ph.D.

Assistant Professor at Lewis and Clark College

Corinne Kodama Ph.D.

Research Specialist at University of Illinois, Chicago

Dina Maramba Ph.D.

Associate Professor at Claremont Graduate University

Erica Yamamura Ph.D.

Associate Professor at Seattle University

Erin Wright Ph.D.

Assistant Professor at University of Hawaii at Manoa

Julia J. Park Ph.D.

Associate Professor at University of Maryland, College Park

Liza Talusan Ph.D.

Associate Lecturer Professor at University of Massachusetts, Boston

Mitchell Chang Ph.D.

Professor at University of California, Los Angeles

OiYan Poon Ph.D.

Associate Professor at Colorado State University

Rob Teranishi Ph.D.

Professor at University of California, Los Angeles

Rosemary (Rosie) J. Perez Ph.D.

Assistant Professor at Iowa State University

Samuel Museus Ph.D.

Assistant Professor at Indiana University Bloomington

Thai- Huy Nguyen Ph.D.

Assistant Professor at Seattle University

Varaxy Yi Borromeo Ph.D.
Assistant Professor at California State University, Fresno 

Events

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