2016 NASPA Closing the Achievement Gap: Student Success in Higher Education Conference

June 09 – June 11, 2016
College Park, MD

The 2016 NASPA Closing the Achievement Gap: Student Success in Higher Education Conference will focus on how student affairs practitioners can develop effective approaches to support students who struggle to complete their degree.

About

The 2016 NASPA Closing the Achievement Gap: Student Success in Higher Education Conference will focus on how student affairs practitioners can develop effective approaches to support students who struggle to complete their degree. Further, the conference programs will elaborate on how to address factors woven into students’ experiences which may impact their success and completion, such as being a member of an underrepresented student population; being low income; first generation; DACA (Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals) status; experiencing homelessness or food insecurity; or work and family obligations.

Attend this conference to:

  • Expand knowledge of students who struggle to complete their degree, and develop meaningful connection and engagement opportunities;
  • Understand barriers preventing students from entering college and how to implement support systems;
  • Recognize the role of technology in serving these student populations;
  • Learn to further navigate economic barriers for these students and provide support; and
  • Recognize mental and emotional stressors that may impede students from degree completion.

 

Presented By


2016 NASPA Closing the Achievement Gap: Student Success in Higher Education Conference

Audience

This event is most likely to influence these groups.

  • Mid-Level
  • Senior Level
  • AVP or “Number Two”
  • Vice President for Student Affairs

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Call for Programs

The Call for Programs is now closed. Programs for the 2016 Closing the Achievement Gap conference will focus on the following themes:

Conference Themes & Suggested Topics

  • Expand knowledge of students who struggle to complete their degree, and develop meaningful connection and engagement opportunities:

    • How do student affairs professionals create programs that are culturally relevant to students?
    • How do student affairs professionals help students balance employment and campus engagement?
    • What are effective retention methods? What interventions are institutions using to retain students who are identified as at-risk for departing the institution?
    • What support models offer compelling results for acclimating students to college life (peer mentorship, etc.)?
    • How are parents or other caring adults engaged in the process?

  • Understand barriers preventing students from entering college and how to implement support systems:

    • What programs are most effective in preparing students for college?  How is success in these programs measured?
    • With research suggesting most first generation students attend institutions within 100 miles of home, what strategies can college and universities use to recruit students who select institutions based on their proximity?
    • How are colleges and universities best supporting undocumented students, including, but not limited to those of DACA status or DREAMers (Development, Relief, and Education for Alien Minors)?
    • How do colleges and universities eliminate barriers for students who wish to re-enroll after separation, or transfer students?

  • Recognize the role of technology in serving these student populations:

    • How can the development of online engagement strategies be applied to the retention and persistence of at-risk students?
    • What are “high-tech, high-touch” intervention measures that can decrease staff workloads while still increasing student achievement?

  • Learn to further navigate economic barriers for these students and provide support:

    • How do student affairs professionals, particularly those in admissions / financial aid, counsel students on cost of attendance and the financial responsibility post-graduation?
    • What strategies are institutions using to assist students with navigating personal finance? (Financial readiness centers, etc.)?
    • How are student affairs staff engaging students who balance school and employment?
    • What strategies are career counselors and academic advisors using to support students’ post-graduation success? (Efforts to support job attainment etc.) How do such efforts differ for students who are at-risk of not completing college?

  • Recognize mental and emotional stressors that may impede students from degree completion:

    • What are successful counseling structures to support students in managing competing priorities?
    • What health and wellness efforts do campuses offer to help any student with personal care (such as getting adequate sleep, managing stress levels, and healthy eating)?



Looking for tips on writing an effective NASPA proposal? See sample submissions and formatting tips in our Program Submission Guidelines.

Submission Timeline
  • January 22, 2016
    Call for Reviewers Closes
  • February 12, 2016
    Call for Programs Closes
  • March 4, 2016
    Notification Date

Writing Tips

Looking for tips on writing an effective NASPA proposal? See sample submissions and formatting tips in our Program Submission Guidelines.

Questions?

Please contact NASPA if you have any further questions about submitting a program proposal for the 2016 NASPA Closing the Achievement Gap: Student Success in Higher Education Conference.

Jace Kirschner
Assistant Director of Educational Programs
Phone: 202-265-7500 x2004
Email: [email protected]

Schedule

The schedule will continue to be updated.

A PDF copy of the program book is now available to download.

Thu, Jun 09

8:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m.
Registration Open
9:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m.
Pre-Conference Workshops
1:00 p.m. – 2:30 p.m.
Opening Keynote
2:45 p.m. – 3:45 p.m.
Concurrent Sessions
Ensuring the Success of First-Generation Students: Strategies for Increasing Direct and Campus-Wide Impact
While We Still Have a Chance: Elevating Student Affairs Practice in Community College Redesign
“Mine” the Gap: Leveraging Data and Analytics to Improve Student Success
Asset-Based Institutional Change through Collectivist Narratives: Inclusive Excellence Actively Impacting Student Success
Student Centered Approach to Closing the Black Male Graduation Gap at Maryland
Student Finances and Student Success: Overview of Research and Best Practices
Undocumented: The Divide in Access and Equity to Postsecondary Education
4:00 p.m. – 5:00 p.m.
Concurrent Sessions
DreamZone Allyship Program: Creating Safe Spaces for Undocumented Students on Campus
Engaging Students Beyond Campus: Using Deliberative Dialogue to Create Change
Generating and Utilizing Data to Inform Persistence-Related Priorities, Practices, and Programs
Reel Them In: A Framework for Bridging Underrepresented Students to STEM Majors
Resourceful Advising: Eliminating the Stress to Support Students
So Called At-Risk: How We Improved our 4-year Grad Rates by 50%
5:00 p.m. – 6:30 p.m.
Opening Reception

Fri, Jun 10

8:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m.
Registration Open
8:00 a.m. – 9:00 a.m.
Continental Breakfast
9:00 a.m. – 10:15 a.m.
Panel Discussion
10:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.
Extended Sessions
DACAmented but Not Fully Integrated
Interventions to Address Food and Housing Insecurity Among
Student Affairs: Guiding Pathways in the National Completion Agenda
Preparing to Engage Low-Income and First-Generation College Students Using Anti-Deficit Achievement Framework
Vertically Aligning Pathways for Increased Impact: Access, Transfers, Success, & Senior Completion
12:30 p.m. – 1:45 p.m.
Conference Break
1:45 p.m. – 2:45 p.m.
Concurrent Sessions
Cross Divisional Partnerships: A Pathway to Graduation
Debunking the Myth: Key Insights and Lesssons Learned on the Path to Success for First Generation Students
Leadership Development for Social Change in Students in a Community Involvement Program
Present and Successful: Strategies to Assist Non-Traditional African American Male Students
The Law School Environment as Experienced by Academically Dismissed Black and Latina/o Law Students
Twelve Touch Points in Twelve Months: Interventions that Work
3:00 p.m. – 3:50 p.m.
Roundtable Discussions
Addressing Campus Diversity: Leaders Facilitating Purposeful Paths to Inclusion
At the Intersections During Historic Social Unrest: Understanding the Current Experiences of International Students in Higher Education
Mother, Mentor, Master: It's Not in The Job Description
Flash Sessions
A Latino Programming Board: The Story, the Programs, the Results
What to do When Your Transition Course Isn't Transitioning Students
4:05 p.m. – 5:05 p.m.
Concurrent Sessions
"But You're an African American Cultural Center?" Cultural Centers as Spaces for Retaining and Graduating Students of Color
Appalachian Women: Increasing Degree Completion by Utilizing Appreciative Advising
Communities at the Margins: Inspiring Interest and Hope in Higher Education
Emergency Aid for College Students: Results of a National
How to Optimize Your Online, Interactive Workshops to Better Support Student Success and Retention Efforts
Retaining Students One By One

Sat, Jun 11

7:30 a.m. – 11:00 a.m.
Registration Open
7:30 a.m. – 8:30 a.m.
Continental Breakfast
8:30 a.m. – 9:15 a.m.
Morning Keynote
9:30 a.m. – 10:30 a.m.
Concurrent Sessions
Academics Anonymous: Using Technology for Academic Recovery
An Examination of Psychosociocultural Factors Associated with Academic Achievement and Persistence among Latina Undergraduate Students
Building Purposeful Relationships: Meaningful Engagement of First-Year, First-Generation, Low-Income Students
Plugging Leaks in the College Pipeline: Overcoming the Remediation Challenge
Supporting Student Success Through Peer Networks: Mentoring Throughout the Undergraduate Career
Strategic Planning with Oscar Felix
10:45 a.m. – 11:45 a.m.
Concurrent Sessions
Behind-the-Scenes: The Data Systems Behind Retention & Persistence
Beyond the BA: Paving the Way to Graduate Academic Success
Creating Change from the Middle: A Case Study for Increasing Campus Support for First-Generation Students
Developing a Productive Peer Academic Success Coaching Model through Effective Campus Collaborations
Supporting student persistence through coordinated benefits: The Single Stop Model

Pre-Conference Programs & Events

Ensuring the Success of First-Generation Students: Strategies for Increasing Direct and Campus-wide Impact

Thursday, June 9th • 09.00 AM – 12.00 PM

The mission of the Suder Foundation is to dramatically improve the graduation rate of first-generation college students via a four-year holistic student success program - First Scholars®. We also facilitate collaboration among our network of affiliated universities. One effort supported teams of higher ed professionals in developing and piloting scalable strategies to effect the success of greater numbers of first-generation students. This workshop highlights four initiatives and shares best practices for implementation and delivery.

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To improve the graduation rate of first-generation college students, The Suder Foundation operates our signature student support program, First Scholars, in partnership with six affiliated four-year public universities across the country. However, there are many more first-generation students than First Scholars can serve. In an effort to scale supports to these students, we collaborated with student affairs professionals, faculty, and administrators at our university affiliates to develop and pilot four strategic initiatives. Three of these strategies are student focused (Workshops, Strengths Programming, First-Gen Living Learning Communities). The fourth offers Professional Development to various populations of campus personnel, educating them on  the issues and potential of  first-generation college students, outlining best practices for better serving this student population, and suggesting methods for catalyzing greater campus awareness and support. 


It is reported that first-generation college students often lack the cultural capital about higher education when compared with their peers, whose parents have a college degree. Their learning curve may be steeper related to things such as study time or financial management, availability of student services on campus, and how best to approach a faculty member, etc. With this in mind, the student-focused strategic initiatives emphasize learning practical skills such as time management or study skills, learning about and appreciating one’s  strengths and using them accordingly, and creating opportunities  for social engagement with other first-generation peers. The Professional Development initiative targets college personnel serving first-generation college students. A working group created a Toolkit containing workshops and exercises directed at specific populations: graduate teaching assistants/fellows, faculty, staff, and administrators. The information to be shared highlights methods for bridging the gaps in social and cultural capital that first-generation students face and suggests ways for campus personnel to effectively raise awareness and increase institutional support for first-generation students. 


This preconference workshop is interactive. Initially, it will provide an overview of each strategic initiative and then address one or two aspects of each in-depth. Practitioners from our affiliate campuses will share best practices and lessons learned from their respective campus engagement with first-generation students and with their campus peers.  Participants will walk away with an understanding of three strategies for directly impacting the success of first-generation students and how those methods can be implemented at their home institution.  In addition, participants will learn about successful practices for increasing awareness and institutionalizing support for first-generation students.   


LEARNING OUTCOMES:


  1. This workshop will inform participants about the cultural capital gaps and strengths that first-generation college students present with.
  2. Participants will learn best practices for the engagement, retention, and graduation of first-generation college students. 
  3. Participants will gain an understanding of how faculty/staff can benefit from on-going professional development regarding the needs of first-gen students and how to leverage this information to change institutional culture.

While We Still Have a Chance: Elevating Student Affairs Practice in Community College Redesign

Thursday, June 9th • 09.00 AM – 12.00 PM

In this pre-conference workshop, Dr. Michael A. Baston, Vice President for Student Affairs and Associate Provost at LaGuardia Community college will share the current national community college redesign effort, “guided pathways”, which has as the focus the need for clearer, more educationally coherent programs of study that simplify students’ choices without limiting their options and that enable them to complete credentials and advance to further education and the labor market more quickly and at less cost.

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In Redesigning America’s Community Colleges authors Thomas Bailey, Shanna Jaggars and Davis Jenkins note that community colleges were originally designed to expand college enrollments at low cost, not to maximize completion of high-quality programs of study. They suggest that the resulting “cafeteria-style” model in which students pick courses from a bewildering array of choices, with little guidance has emerged and is prevalent. Many community colleges are organized to support students based on operational assumptions that favor drawing distinct lines between the role of Academic Affairs and Student Affairs in contributing to a students’ success. Fragmented structures assume, upon entry, community college students have the know-how to direct their own progress, possess well developed plans, are highly motivated, capable of making informed choices, of knowing their abilities and preferences, of understanding the full range of college and career alternatives, of weighing the costs and benefits associated with different college programs, and of possessing the social skills and job-search skills to get appropriate jobs. These assumptions have not been substantiated by national retention and/or completion data.

Divisions of Student Affairs are essential to the viability of the national completion agenda. We recognize the importance of developing a holistic approach to student supports that includes adequate and reliable access to nutrition, housing, transportation, childcare, and health care, in addition to traditional academic supports. We know that words like “access” and “affordability” often suggest opportunities that don’t fully address the real cost of higher education for low income students — costs which greatly exceed tuition. While traditional financial aid sources, such as Pell grants, student loans, state financial aid programs and scholarships are important, we recognize that a holistic student support infrastructure is critical for the persistence and completion of this growing segment attending America’s colleges and universities. We are on the front lines of responding to changing student demographics. Our efforts prepare students for a changing world as they search for their own sense of meaning and purpose. We create the high-value out of the classroom experiences that contextualize and amplify in classroom learning. Yet, with all of our knowledge and expertise the primary discussion of our support in the national community college redesign effort centers around the intake process, academic advising, student success courses and learning communities which may or may not be in the student affairs portfolio depending on the campus structure.   

In this pre-conference workshop, Dr. Michael A. Baston, Vice President for Student Affairs and Associate Provost at LaGuardia Community college will share the current national community college redesign effort, “guided pathways”, which has as the focus the need for clearer, more educationally coherent programs of study that simplify students’ choices without limiting their options and that enable them to complete credentials and advance to further education and the labor market more quickly and at less cost. The guided pathways effort emerged from distilling a wealth of data amassed from the Community College Research Center (CCRC) and has become a catalyst for coordinated change through the American Association of Community College’s Pathways project. Using CCRC’s nonacademic support mechanisms categories, the workshop will give participants the opportunity to do a current practice diagnostic for their campus and work on prioritizing areas of focus to frame the work of Student Affairs in the effort to close the achievement gap using holistic student support strategies. 

This pre-conference workshop is free and open only to registered conference attendees who work at or attend community colleges.

Registration

Registration is currently open for the 2016 Closing the Achievement Gap conference.

Registration Fees

Early-Bird
10/26/2015 to 04/08/2016
Regular
04/09/2016 to 05/27/2016
Late
after 05/28/2016
NASPA Member
$425
$475
$550
Non-Member
$625
$675
$750
NASPA Student Member
$130
$185
$235
Pre-Conference Workshop
$65
$85
$90

Questions?

Jace Kirschner
Assistant Director, Educational Programs
Email: [email protected]
Phone: 202-903-0644

Policies

View Registration Policies

Cancellation:  The cancellation deadline to receive a refund is April 8, 2016, less a $50.00 administrative fee.  No refunds will be given after the deadline for any reason.  All requests for cancellation and refunds must be in writing and sent to [email protected]. This program may be cancelled or postponed due to unforeseen circumstances. In this case, fees will be refunded; however, NASPA will not be responsible for additional costs, charges, or expenses, including cancellation/change charges assessed by airlines, hotels, and/or travel agencies. NASPA is not responsible for weather or travel related problems and will not reimburse registration fees for these issues. 

Group Registration Discount: NASPA offers a discount for members registering in groups of two or more individuals from a single institution. To apply for this discount send a request in writing to [email protected] prior to applying payment to registration orders. Please include all registrants’ full names, the institution name, and the title of the event. The membership department will follow up for any additional information required and provide a personalized discount code each member of your group can use when processing payment.

Purchase Orders: NASPA does NOT accept purchase orders as a form of payment. For registrants requiring an invoice to have a check payment processed, please use the Bill Me payment method to complete your registration. The resulting invoice can be found and downloaded under the My NASPA section of the website (must be logged-in), by selecting theView Invoices link from the dropdown menu. Alternatively, email a request to Membership to have a PDF of your invoice sent to you. Bill Me registrations are considered complete and will hold your place in an event, however the balance due must be settled prior to attending.

Click here to view NASPA’s complete Payment Policies and Procedures.

Additional Questions? Please contact the NASPA office at 202-265-7500 or via e-mail to [email protected].

Speakers


Sponsors

If you would like to exhibit at or sponsor the 2016 NASPA Closing the Achievement Gap: Student Success in Higher Education Conference please fill out the exhibitor application form and e-fax back all 3 pages to 202-204-8443 or scan and e-mail to [email protected] by May 13, 2016. Questions? Contact Szymon Kesek by phone at 202-903-0657 or via email at [email protected].

Venue

College Park Marriott Hotel & Conference Center


College Park Marriott Hotel & Conference Center
Hyattsville, MD

All conference activities will take place at the College Park Marriott Hotel & Conference Center, located on the University of Maryland - College Park campus.

At this time, the College Park Marriott Hotel has sold out of guest rooms.

An overflow conference room block has been made at the Holiday Inn Greenbelt for Closing the Achievement Gap attendees. The special conference rate at the Holiday Inn Greenbelt is $139 a night plus applicable state and local taxes (currently 13%).  A dedicated shuttle will be available to conference attendees transportating to and from the College Park Marriott over the conference dates. 

To make a reservation at the Holiday Inn Greenbelt, please click here or call Holiday Inn Reservations at (301) 982-7000 on or before Wednesday, May 25, 2016. Please identify yourself as part of the NASPA Closing the Achievement Gap Conference. 

Shuttle Service:

Shuttle service will be provided from the Holiday Inn Greenbelt to the Conference Center on the following schedule (first come, first serve, shuttle will leave promptly at designated time):

Thursday, June 9, 2016:
7:30 am leaving from Greenbelt Holiday Inn to College Park Marriott
11:30 am leaving from Greenbelt Holiday Inn to College Park Marriott 
6:45 pm leaving from College Park Marriott to Greenbelt Holiday Inn

Friday, June 10, 2016:
7:15 am leaving from Greenbelt Holiday Inn to College Park Marriott
5:15 pm leaving from College Park Marriott to Greenbelt Holiday Inn

Saturday, June 11, 2016:
7:00 am leaving from Greenbelt Holiday Inn to College Park Marriott 
12:00 pm leaving from College Park Marriott to Greenbelt Holiday Inn 

  • Travel

    College Park is serviced by Ronald Reagan International Airport (DCA). The hotel is approximately 15 miles from the airport. Washington Dulles International Airport - IAD is 50 miles and Baltimore/Washington International Thurgood Marshall Airport - BWI is 30 miles from the hotel.

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